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Singin' in the Rain

Singin' in the Rain(1952)

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teaser Singin' in the Rain (1952)

SYNOPSIS

Don Lockwood is a famous silent screen star that stars in swashbuckling adventures. His latest venture is The Dueling Cavalier in which he stars opposite Lina Lamont, one of the most glamorous actresses in movies. For publicity purposes they pretend to be romantically involved in their personal lives but, in reality, Don has his eye on Kathy Selden, a chorus girl he met at a film premiere party. When Don's studio boss, R. F. Simpson, decides to turn The Dueling Cavalier into a talking picture, they experience some major problems, particularly with Ms. Lamont whose voice is laughable. Luckily, Don and his buddy, Cosmo Brown, come up with the perfect solution for their temperamental leading lady. They hire Kathy Selden to talk and sing for Ms. Lamont who only has to lip-synch to the words. It's a great plan but it doesn't proceed very smoothly due to Don and Kathy's budding romance which drives Lina to jealous extremes.

Producer: Arthur Freed
Director: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly
Screenplay: Betty Comden, Adolph Green
Art Direction: Randall Duell, Cedric Gibbons
Cinematography: Harold Rosson
Costume Design: Walter Plunkett
Editing: Adrienne Fazan
Original Music: Nacio Herb Brown, Lennie Hayton
Lyrics: Arthur Freed
Choreography: Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen (uncredited)
Cast: Gene Kelly (Don Lockwood), Donald O'Connor (Cosmo Brown), Debbie Reynolds (Kathy Selden), Jean Hagen (Lina Lamont), Millard Mitchell (R.F. Simpson), Cyd Charisse (Dancer), Douglas Fowley (Roscoe Dexter), Rita Moreno (Zelda Zanders).
C-103m. Closed captioning. Descriptive Video.

Why Singin' in the Rain is Essential

For many critics and fans,Singin' in the Rain is simply the finest musical ever made. And they may be right. Everyone was at the top of their game on this film from the choreographers to the co-directors to the actors to the songwriters. Singin' in the Rain epitomizes everything that made the musical genre such an exciting form of entertainment during the heyday of the studio era. It's also a great cure for the blues. Take a look at Singin' in the Rain and the clouds will disappear, every time.

While the film is chock full of musical highlights, Gene Kelly's "Singin' in the Rain" number is the genuine showstopper. Regarding his immortal solo number, Kelly later commented, quite graciously and modestly, on what made the scene work so well: "The concept was so simple I shied away from explaining it to the brass at the studio in case I couldn't make it sound worth doing. The real work for this one was done by the technicians who had to pipe two city blocks on the backlot with overhead sprays, and the poor cameraman who had to shoot through all that water. All I had to do was dance." The technicians' efforts are all the more remarkable since there was a severe water shortage in Culver City, California, the day the sequence was shot.Singin' in the Rain (1952) rang up a final price tag of $2,540,800, $157,000 of which went to Walter Plunkett's costumes alone. Although the final price overshot MGM's budget by $665,000, the studio quickly realized the wisdom of their investment when the film returned a $7.7 million return upon its initial release.

Gene Kelly was at his peak in Singin' in the Rain and not only poked fun at himself as a swashbuckling matinee idol but also served as co-director and choreographer with Stanley Donen during production. Kelly first made a name for himself in the film industry with Cover Girl (1944) in which he revolutionized the Hollywood musical with his innovative and free-flowing dance routines. He topped that success with an Oscar nomination for Best Actor in Anchors Aweigh (1945) but he really hit his stride with On the Town (1949), the first of three successful collaborations with director Stanley Donen. While there are many other high points in Kelly's later career - An American in Paris (1951), It's Always Fair Weather (1955), and Invitation to the Dance (1956), Singin' in the Rain will probably remain his signature film. Danny Peary, in his book Cult Movies, wrote "I believe that the secret to the picture's greatness is that Kelly, the star, the co-director, willingly shared his picture with his costars. It is not by mere chance that Reynolds, O'Connor, and Hagen have never been better. True, Kelly takes many moments in the limelight, dancing up a storm and turning in a fine, self-parodying (hammy, conceited, smiling) comedic performance. Yet he allows Jean Hagen ample opportunity to walk away with the acting actors."

The role of the ditzy movie diva Lina Lamont was written with Judy Holliday in mind. Holliday was a close personal friend of Betty Comden and Adolph Green and the married couple even modeled the character on routines they had worked up with Holliday back when they were part of a satirical group called The Revuers in New York. But timing was everything and the idea of casting Holliday was vetoed after she hit it big in Born Yesterday (1950). Everyone figured she'd be uninterested in the supporting part but, as it turned out, the lovely Jean Hagen, Holliday's understudy on Broadway for Born Yesterday, got the part.

Debbie Reynolds was only 19 when she was cast as Kathy Selden in Singin' in the Rain. Her relative inexperience in musicals concerned the MGM brass, but Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen convinced the executives that the pert young starlet could hold her ground. Reynolds always stated that Kelly and Donen really didn't want her either because she was not a good enough dancer. But Donen maintains that the co-directors wanted her from the very beginning, even though Judy Garland and June Allyson were once considered as possibilities. Reynolds later remarked that she was "being thrown to the lions." But since she was planning to be a gymnastics instructor, Reynolds was already a natural athlete, and a hard worker. She abandoned the physical fitness field though after being discovered by a talent agent at a beauty contest in Burbank, California.

The character of Cosmo Brown, played by Donald O'Connor, was penned with songwriter and pianist Oscar Levant in mind. But once Gene Kelly became involved in the project, effectively turning the film from a strictly song-centered film to one that emphasized dancing, it was agreed that Donald O'Connor was a better choice for the part. O'Connor's background in the circus (his father was an acrobat for Ringling Brothers and his mother was a tightrope walker) enabled him to bring an immeasurable athleticism to his part. But while O'Connor matched Gene Kelly step for step, he also suffered physically for his art, just like co-star Debbie Reynolds. For the "Make 'em Laugh" number, Kelly asked O'Connor to revive a trick he had done as a young dancer, running up a wall and completing a somersault. The number was so physically taxing that O'Connor, who was smoking four packs of cigarettes a day at the time, went to bed for a week after its completion, suffering from exhaustion and painful carpet burns. Unfortunately, an accident ruined all of the initial footage so after a brief rest, O'Connor, ever the professional, agreed to do the difficult number all over again.

Cyd Charisse, who plays Gene Kelly's dancing partner in the "Broadway Ballet" number, had studied ballet in Los Angeles with Adolph Bolm and Bronislawa Nijinska, and then danced with Ballets Russes under the name of Siderova. After World War II, she was given a dancing role in Gregory Ratoff's Something to Shout About (1943). This role brought her to the attention of choreographer Robert Alton and she was soon hired by Arthur Freed to be the resident ballet dancer at MGM.

by Scott McGee

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teaser Singin' in the Rain (1952)

Pop Culture 101 - SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

Singin' in the Rain drew as much from past popular culture as it did from contemporary references and attitudes. Most of the songs were drawn from past musicals: "You Were Meant For Me" and "The Wedding of the Painted Doll," were warbled in The Broadway Melody (1929), while "Good Morning" was crooned in Babes in Arms (1939). The title song first appeared in The Hollywood Revue of 1929, with MGM's stable of stars decked out in raincoats, singing in unison to the tune. "All I Do Is Dream of You" was featured in Sadie McKee (1934); "Should I?" showed up in Lord Byron of Broadway (1930); "Beautiful Girl" was banged out by Bing Crosby in Going Hollywood (1933); "You Are My Lucky Star," "Broadway Rhythm," and "I've Got a Feelin' You're Foolin'" were all part of Broadway Melody of 1936 (1935); and "Would You" is from San Francisco (1936). "Make 'em Laugh" shamelessly draws upon Cole Porter's "Be a Clown," which was featured in The Pirate (1948), also starring Gene Kelly. One of the popular favorites in Singin' in the Rain is "Moses Supposes," which was an original composition written by Betty Comden and Adolph Green.

Just as Kelly and co-director Stanley Donen reused a huge repertoire of popular songs from earlier musicals, the duo also looted the MGM warehouses for props and vehicles. The car Debbie Reynolds drives at the beginning of the film was actually Andy Hardy's old jalopy. The mansion in which Gene Kelly lives was decorated with tables, chairs, carpets and other items that were used for John Gilbert and Greta Garbo's passionate romantic drama, Flesh and the Devil (1926).Even the costumes were based on old Hollywood styles. Costume designer Walter Plunkett devised Lina Lamont's wardrobe by duplicating his own gown designs for silent screen star Lilyan Tashman, who was, according to Plunkett, "the epitome of chic at that time." In addition, Kelly and Donen grilled MGM employees on their memories of the silent era. Some veterans on the set still remembered the problems of early sound recording, and the art directors actually unearthed filmmaking equipment from the past, including an "icebox" to house the sound camera from old specifications and designs. A neglected soundstage used during the silent era was also located and brought back into active service for the production.

The song "Singin' in the Rain" has been featured in many films, but it was Stanley Kubrick who made ironic use of the song in his bleak vision of a dystopian future, A Clockwork Orange (1971). Kubrick mulled for days over a way to shoot the scene where Alex (Malcolm McDowell) brutalizes a woman. Out of the blue, he turned to McDowell and asked, "Can you sing?" McDowell replied, "I only know one song," and he started to do "Singin' in the Rain." Kubrick then left the room and called Warner Bros. in Hollywood to ask if he could obtain the rights to "Singin' in the Rain." He came back to the set an hour later and wryly told Adrienne Corri (cast as the rape/murder victim), "You're playing the Debbie Reynolds part, Corri." Coincidentally, Stanley Donen was in London at the time and not far from the location site for A Clockwork Orange. When Kubrick asked Donen for his opinion of this new use of the song, Donen surprisingly raised no objections.

The "Broadway Ballet" sequence was partially based on an idea that was used for Du Barry Was a Lady (1943), starring Red Skelton as a nightclub worker who dreams that he's King Louis XVI.

by Scott McGee

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teaser Singin' in the Rain (1952)

SINGIN' IN THE RAIN - Trivia and Other Fun Stuff

Mae Clarke can be glimpsed as a hairdresser in Singin' in the Rain. She was immortalized as the gun moll who gets a grapefruit in the kisser from James Cagney in The Public Enemy (1931).

Like the character of Cosmo Brown in Singin' in the Rain, producer Arthur Freed was once employed as a mood-music pianist who played on movie sets during the silent film era.

Among his many musicals, Gene Kelly did not rank Singin' in the Rain as his personal favorite. He always considered On the Town (1949) his best work.

The comical bit that Donald O'Connor does in the "Make 'em Laugh" sequence, where he pushes and pulls on his face to make absurd faces, is known as "gurning."

Gene Kelly reportedly had a 103 degrees temperature when he filmed the famous title number and his drenched clothing certainly didn't improve his condition. The rain, consisting of water and a touch of milk, also caused Kelly's wool suit to shrink.

Ironically, Debbie Reynolds' voice was dubbed by Betty Royce for the scenes where Reynolds' character dubs Lina Lamont's singing and speaking voice. And in one scene were Kathy Selden (Debbie Reynolds) is dubbing Lina Lamont (Jean Hagen), Hagen is actually dubbing Reynolds dubbing Hagen on screen for just one line. Is that confusing enough?

At R.F. Simpson's house party where a demonstration of the new 'talking' picture is first shown, you'll notice a mysterious movie star couple slinking around the sidelines, dressed to the nines. That couple is a caricature of two silent film superstars, the actor being an amalgamation of John Gilbert and Rudolph Valentino, while the exotic vamp may be a spoof of Gloria Swanson, Greta Garbo, and Pola Negri.

Other references to old Hollywood in Singin' in the Rain include Cyd Charisse's hair style, which resembles Louise Brooks' famous bob, and Charisse's gangster boyfriend, who flips a coin like George Raft did in Scarface, Shame of a Nation (1932). Don Lockwood's (Gene Kelly) laughable dialogue in the disastrous preview of the all-talking "The Dueling Cavalier" is based on fact. The sad decline of silent screen idol John Gilbert was hastened by a similar situation in one of his early sound films - Redemption (1930) which features equally lame dialogue. John Gilbert is referred to again in Singin' in the Rain, when Don Lockwood disparages Kathy's "acting" at the Hollywood party by asking if she's going to do the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet. It was in MGM's early talkie, The Hollywood Revue of 1929, that Gilbert performed that very scene with Norma Shearer.

Director Stanley Donen has always felt that the title, Singin' in the Rain, was something of a misnomer since the story has nothing to do with the weather, and everything to do with Tinsletown. He thinks it should have been called Hollywood.

In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Gene Kelly's father had once worked as a phonograph record salesman but lost his job due to the declining record market, which had been adversely affected by the rising popularity of radio and talking pictures.

While Singin' in the Rain was being filmed on MGM's Culver City lot, there was another movie in production which focused on the film industry - The Bad and the Beautiful (1952). The Vincente Minnelli melodrama was being filmed simultaneously on a nearby soundstage.

Famous Quotes from SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

Lina: Oh Donny! You couldn't kiss me like that and not mean it just a teensy bit!
Don: Meet the greatest actor in the world! I'd rather kiss a tarantula.
Lina: You don't mean that.
Don: I don't--- Hey Joe, get me a tarantula.

Lina: Gee, this wig weighs a ton! What dope'd wear a thing like this?
Roscoe: Everybody used to wear them, Lina.
Lina: Well, then everybody was a dope.

Cosmo: Talking pictures, that means I'm out of a job. At last I can start suffering and write that symphony.
Simpson: You're not out of a job, we're putting you in as head of our new music department.
Cosmo: Oh, thanks, R.F.! At last I can stop suffering and write that symphony.

Lina: Why, I make more money than - than - than Calvin Coolidge, put together!

Lina: "People"? I ain't "people." I am a - "a shimmering, glowing star in the cinema firmament."

Lina: If we bring a little joy into your humdrum lives, it makes us feel as if our hard work ain't been in vain for nothing.

[A dancer watching Lina Lamont in "The Royal Rascal"] Flapper: She's so refined. I think I'll kill myself.

Lockwood: What's the matter with that girl? Can't she take a gentle hint?
Cosmo: Well haven't ya heard? She's irresistible. She told me so herself.

Compiled by Scott McGee

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teaser Singin' in the Rain (1952)

The Big Idea Behind SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

MGM producer Arthur Freed decided to make a "catalogue" picture, a musical sub-genre often based on a catalogue of music from a single songwriting source. In the case of Singin' in the Rain (1952), the source was Nacio Herb Brown and Freed himself (the producer had been a songwriter before producing films). Betty Comden and Adolph Green were commissioned to write a musical that would build upon Freed and Brown's extensive oeuvre of musical tunes. After being hired, Comden and Green decided that Hollywood during the 'Roaring Twenties' - the era of flappers, pinstripes, and early jalopies - would be the perfect setting for the film. They first thought about remaking Bombshell (1933), a satire about tinsel town starring Jean Harlow, with Howard Keel, one of the leading baritones on the screen, as the star. In fact, they toyed with the idea of having Keel play a two-bit western actor who becomes a singing cowboy. But this idea was abandoned after Gene Kelly expressed an interest in the project.

The idea of having the main character, Don Lockwood (played by Kelly), break into the motion picture business by performing stunts on movies has a kernel of truth to it. Most of the early stuntmen came from professions other than the movies, such as the rodeo circuit or the nascent aviation industry. Admittedly, not many of the stuntmen came from a musical background like Gene Kelly's character does in Singin' in the Rain. However, many established movie stars, such as Douglas Fairbanks Sr. and Buster Keaton, were known for their ability to perform daring stunts that even the most experienced professional stuntman would hesitate to perform.

The original idea for a spectacular, pull-out-the-stops climax was not the "Broadway Ballet" sequence which is a highlight of Singin' in the Rain but an extravagant musical number set in the Wild West with Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, and Donald O'Connor traveling across the plains in a covered wagon. The trio of piano playing pioneers would be attacked by Indians, somehow managing to save their own scalps by diverting their captors with the universal language of music and dance....at least, until the cavalry arrived to save the day. Fortunately, this idea was scrapped in favor of the superior "Broadway Ballet" sequence.

By Scott McGee

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teaser Singin' in the Rain (1952)

Behind the Camera on SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

For the dream segment within the "Broadway Ballet" sequence, Gene Kelly choreographed a scarf dance, using an enormous fifty-foot veil of white China silk attached to Cyd Charisse's costume. A strong wind was created using airplane motors but Cyd Charisse could hardly stay on her feet because of the pressure of the wind. The "Broadway Ballet" sequence took a month to rehearse, two weeks to shoot, and cost $600,000, almost a fifth of the overall budget.

One crucial ingredient needed to guarantee the success of Singin' in the Rain was the right cinematographer. John Alton, who had won an Oscar for his color photography on An American in Paris (1951), had been assigned to the picture, but Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen soon had him replaced with Harold Rosson, who had worked with Kelly and Donen in On the Town (1949). Rosson's lighting and mobile camera are very evident in the "Singin' in the Rain" number. The title song was shot out of doors on one of the permanent streets built on the studio backlot - the East Side Street. The area was blacked out with tarpaulins (rather than shooting "day-for-night") and had to be lit from behind so that the rain was visible to the camera but without the carbon arc lights reflecting in the shop windows. Milk was added to the water to make it more visible to the camera. A similar method was used by Akira Kurosawa for the opening and closing sequences in Rashomon (1950).

The "Make 'em Laugh" sequence was created because Gene Kelly felt that Donald O'Connor needed a solo number. As O'Connor noted in an interview, "Gene didn't have a clue as to the kind of number it was meant to be." The two of them brainstormed ideas in the rehearsal room, and came up with a compendium of gags and "shtick" that O'Connor had done for years, some of which he had performed in vaudeville. O'Connor recalled, "Every time I got a new idea or remembered something that had worked well for me in the past, Gene wrote it down and, bit by bit, the entire number was constructed." The real highpoint - the scene where O'Connor runs up a wall and completes a somersault - was one that O'Connor had performed years before in vaudeville. To give himself confidence for the sequence, O'Connor invited his brother over to help him rehearse the stunt with a rope.

Debbie Reynolds had to train rigorously for her role so she could keep up with Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor. This meant mastering the art of tap dancing and other complicated steps. After they finished the "Good Morning" number, Reynolds had to be carried to her dressing room because she had burst some blood vessels in her feet. Reynolds later stated that she "learned a lot from (Kelly). He is a perfectionist and a disciplinarian - the most exciting director I've ever worked for. And he has a good temper. Every so often he would yell at me and make me cry. But it took a lot of patience for him to work with someone who had never danced before. It's amazing that I could keep up with him and Donald O'Connor." Kelly later commented on her work, "Fortunately, Debbie was strong as an ox...also she was a great copyist, and she could pick up the most complicated routine without too much difficulty...at the university of hard work and pain." But despite her hard work on the "Good Morning" number, Kelly decided that someone should dub her tap sounds, so he went into a dubbing room to dub the sound of her feet as well as his own.

By Scott McGee

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teaser Singin' in the Rain (1952)

The Critics' Corner on SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

"Singin' in the Rain" has been voted one of the greatest films of all time in international critics' polls, and is routinely called the greatest of all the Hollywood musicals. I don't think there's any doubt about that. There are other contenders--"Top Hat," "Swing Time," "An American in Paris," "The Bandwagon," "Oklahoma," "West Side Story"--but "Singin' in the Rain" comes first because it is not only from Hollywood, it is about Hollywood. It is set at the moment in the late 1920s when the movies first started to talk, and many of its best gags involve technical details." - Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.

"Escapism raised to the level of art, Singin' In The Rain inventively satirizes the illusions of the filmmaking process while celebrating their life-affirming joy. Half parody, half homage, the movie became the apex of the splashy MGM musical, while showcasing the collaborative possibilities of the studio system. At the time of its release in 1952, Singin' was overshadowed a bit by An American In Paris, which won the Oscar for best picture and was at the time viewed by many as Kelly's magnum opus. Yet 50 years later, the fizzy pop exuberance of Singin' resonates more strongly than Paris' tasteful ambition." - Nathan Rabin, The Onion A.V. Club.

"As fresh as it was thirty years and as many viewings ago, Singin' in the Rain is truly one of the great joys of the cinema, the most uplifting of films...this is also the best, most perceptive, most informative picture ever made about the movie industry." - Danny Peary, Cult Movies.

Awards & Honors

Most people find it hard to believe but Singin' in the Rain earned only two Academy Award nominations; one for Jean Hagen as Best Supporting Actress and one for Lennie Hayton's musical score. Unfortunately, the film won no Academy Awards on Oscar night. While it certainly was an egregious mistake on the Academy's part to ignore such a bona fide American classic, Singin' in the Rain was not as universally lauded in 1952 as it is today. In fact, it was another Gene Kelly musical that was still fresh in everyone's mind - An American in Paris (1951) which won the Oscar for Best Picture in 1951. Singin' in the Rain was considered a lesser effort compared to the popular Vincente Minnelli extravaganza. In fact, the publicity for the April 1952 premiere of Singin' in the Rain was overshadowed by the re-release of An American in Paris (1951) during Oscar month where it swept the awards. It wasn't until 20 years later that Singin' in the Rain started to become an Essential, having been introduced to a new generation of movie lovers via television showings and a prominent place in MGM's feature release, That's Entertainment! (1974).Since its release, Singin' in the Rain has garnered a shelf full of awards and citations, with the exception of the Academy Awards. When the National Film Registry selected their first 25 films in 1989 that were considered culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant, only one musical made the list, and that was Singin' in the Rain. Furthermore, the movie was ranked in the top ten greatest films of all time according to the American Film Institute.Singin' in the Rain reached the number four slot in Sight and Sound's 1982 fiftieth anniversary poll of world film critics' "ten best lists," ranking behind Citizen Kane (1941), The Rules of the Game (1939), and The Seven Samurai (1954).

Compiled by Scott McGee

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teaser Singin' in the Rain (1952)

If TCM host Robert Osborne had his way, the winner of the Oscar® as Best Supporting Actress of 1952 would have been Jean Hagen for MGM's Singin' in the Rain (1952), not Gloria Grahame for the same studio's The Bad and the Beautiful. In the classic musical about the early sound days in Hollywood, Hagen plays Lina Lamont, the glamorous "Queen of the Silent Screen" whose voice unfortunately sounds like chalk on a blackboard. Hagen's hilarious performance owes something to Judy Holliday, who developed a similar character in routines worked up with Singin' in the Rain screenwriters Betty Comden and Adolph Green when all three were part of a New York satirical troupe called "The Revuers." Holliday had since become a movie star, thanks to her Oscar®-winning performance as Billie Dawn, another squeaky-voiced character, in Born Yesterday (1950). Because a supporting role no longer was appropriate for Holliday, the Singin' in the Rain producers went after Hagen, her understudy in the stage version of Born Yesterday.

That Oscar® might have proven the shot in the arm Hagen appeared to need in her film career. A versatile actress who could switch with ease from musical comedy to drama (The Asphalt Jungle, 1950), she never again got the great opportunity afforded her in Singin' in the Rain. After several minor film roles and a three-year stint on TV's The Danny Thomas Show, she made her final movie appearance in Dead Ringer (1964) and died at age 54 in 1977.

Two other female performers were luckier in building on their success in Singin' in the Rain. The movie elevated Debbie Reynolds to full-fledged MGM stardom after small roles in such musicals as Three Little Words (1950) and Two Weeks With Love (1950). An inexperienced dancer when she began making Singin' in the Rain, Reynolds had to drive herself mercilessly to keep up with hard-driving costars Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor. She recalled later that after one strenuous number, she had to be carried to her dressing room because she had burst blood vessels in her feet. Cyd Charisse lucked into her small but star-making role in the film when O'Connor was not available for the climactic "Broadway Melody Ballet," providing an opening for a female dance partner for Kelly. Charisse had been hovering on the edge of stardom at MGM for some years. The unforgettable moment, when one of those long legs shot up with Kelly's hat balanced on her foot, turned the trick. Within a year Charisse was starring in her first musical lead in The Band Wagon (1953), opposite ideal partner Fred Astaire.

Ironically, in view of the fact that many feel Singin' in the Rain is the greatest of all screen muscials, it won only one other Oscar nomination - for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture. It lost to Alfred Newman's score for With a Song in My Heart.

Producer: Arthur Freed
Director: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly
Screenplay: Betty Comden, Adolph Green
Art Direction: Randall Duell, Cedric Gibbons
Cinematography: Harold Rosson
Costume Design: Walter Plunkett
Editing: Adrienne Fazan
Original Music: Nacio Herb Brown, Lennie Hayton
Lyrics: Arthur Freed
Choreography: Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen (uncredited)
Cast: Gene Kelly (Don Lockwood), Donald O'Connor (Cosmo Brown), Debbie Reynolds (Kathy Selden), Jean Hagen (Lina Lamont), Millard Mitchell (R.F. Simpson), Cyd Charisse (Dancer), Douglas Fowley (Roscoe Dexter), Rita Moreno (Zelda Zanders).
C-103m. Closed captioning. Descriptive Video.

by Roger Fristoe

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