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The War Lover

The War Lover(1962)

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The War Lover A WWII bomber pilot succeeds... MORE > $11.95 Regularly $14.99 Buy Now

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  • I should have been the technical adisor

    • denscul
    • 9/3/17

    As a four engine pilot during the Viet Nam war, I recently purchased this DVD and sadly gave it one star. This "war film", like so many other films about flying makes those of us sick at the obvious mistakes made about the men and machines they fly. The film begins in 1943 during WWII. The Flying Fortress is the wrong model. It could not carry 8,000 pounds of bombs. By the time a crew flew on one combat mission, survival became the main concern. The bravado of joining and the boasting at the training camps was replaced by the knowledge that living to go home after 25 missions was mathematically behind every waking moment.Good aircraft commanders were loved by their crews. Those were the ones who could safely fly the aircraft off and on the ground. Fly in bad weather, and most important, not expose them to unnecessary danger. In the first mission, Mc Queens character ignores his commanders abort decision. Imagine anyone willing to fly with him after that. An abort over enemy territory counted as one of the 25, and in the unwritten code of men who fly in combat, nobody could fault anyone who cheats on doing their part. In real life, the film would have ended when Mc Queen reported to the commander. Any military pilot would recognize Mc Queen as a "War Lover". To be brave and techically well qualified is ok, but someone who loves war is mentally unfit to lead men or be counted as trustworthy to take orders. Taking orders, is the foundation of all armies and the duty of all soldiers. McQueens insanity should have ended his flying, and Wagner and between Shirley Ann Field taken over the plot. There were many love stories about English women falling in love with Airmen who never came back. For those who did, it was exceptional, and exceptional and realistic films are so much better than this trash.One final comment, the cover this DVD came in, states his film is 211 minutes long. The producers could not get that right.

  • Meh...

    • RedRain
    • 8/9/13

    I found the screenplay very disjointed and, despite Steve McQueen, the film isn't that good. Hersey's book barely resembles this film. There have been men who loved war since time began. This wasn't news. Patton even said "God help me. I love it so!"

  • McQueen's Best Film?

    • denscul
    • 8/9/13

    McQueen's role in the Blob, a low production film staring pie filling, his first staring role, was better than his performance in this film. Hersey, the writer, is more of a syrupy journalist with political views than a true sreen writer. This film begins a series of films that denigrate war, by denigrating individuals who in real life, would never pass tests that screen out unbalanced men, especially pilots who carry many times the weapons of death, and operate by themselves, or with relatively few other men.Hersey's treatmen of the Hiroshima bombing is an example of his poltcal thought. He always seem to concentrate on the actions of the US and its allies as astrocities, while ignoring the countries that started the war, including the Stalin, whose pact with Hitler, gave him a free hand to invade Western Europe.As for the critic who claims this was McQueen's best role, I think he was lucky this didn't end a career that became a legend.

  • Mcqueen shines in Hersey's War Lover

    • Buzz Rickson
    • 5/29/12

    Steve McQueen's character, Buzz Rickson is the name of a Japanese retro clothing company. Although the rest of this little British gem could have been better. This is McQueen's best performance.

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