skip navigation
Vigil in the Night

Vigil in the Night(1940)

  • Sunday, August 10 @ 01:15 AM (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
Up
Down

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

DVDs from TCM Shop

Vigil in the Night A good nurse ruins her career... MORE > $19.99 Regularly $19.99 Buy Now

USER REVIEWS

user reviews

See Detailed Ratings
    Acting of Lead Performers
    Acting of Supporting Cast
    Director
    Music Score
    Title Sequence
  • No Ratings Available Add Yours Now
    Screenplay
    Cinematography
    Historical Importance
    Would You Recommend?
  • 0 Member Ratings

Add your ratings! Each of the detailed ratings you select will result in a cumulative score for this film.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

    Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
    Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
    Rate the Director
    Rating of the Music Score
    Rating of the Title Sequence
    Screenplay
    Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
    Importance in Cinema history
    Would you recommend for fans of this genre
Submit Ratings Cancel Write a Review Read Reviews

*By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use. TCM will use your personal information consistent with our Privacy Policy

NO REVIEWS AVAILABLE

The title has not been reviewed. Be the first to write a review by clicking here to start.

  • counting the "sponges"

    • alice
    • 10/18/13

    In reply to:'Someone in nursing, tell me..what is the significance in the operating room when they are counting the "sponges" or whatever it was, and Nurse Lee was apparently correct. Why was that such a big deal? The way everyone reacted, it obviously was very important to get the count right.'I am not in nursing, but my sister was. I'll venture to reply since no one has.The sponges were used in the operation, and must be removed before the patient is sewn up (i.e. the incision closed, ending the operation). You don't want any sponges left inside the patient, therefore the number of sponges removed must equal the number of sponges used (which had been counted before).

  • Should always be such a dedicated nurse

    • Nurse Dee
    • 8/31/11

    All nurses prove themselves as dedicated as Anne,not sidetracked like Lucy.I wish I knew some that sacrificed like Lucy at the end,particularly one flighty enough to run out on a hemorrhaging patient,"What do I do,what do I do?"after stuffing her face while he was clearly in shock from bloodloss,just as she ignored an immediate need for promptly calling a doctor when sepsis set in shortly after.I've worked with very few honest enough to own up to their mistakes,but many who point fingers at others for someone else's goofs because that person wasn't part of the clique.Cost Medicare and Taxpayers a pile of money.

  • Good A J Cronin Dramatized

    • Nurse Lizzie
    • 8/31/11

    Still don't see how the sister Lucy could be such a dip,but there are some like that working in nursing today that aren't as well-meaning.We need more idealists that put up with much backbiting like Carole Lombard's character Anne does.Who decides what a good nurse is,but their intentions and actions.Anyone can slip momentarily.It's when catastrophy happens when we find out what we're made of.Hold all caregivers responsible for their individual actions,and administrators for cutting costs and corners.No one should suffer for the negligent,except the negligent themselves.

  • Well-done Drama starring The Great Carole Lombard

    • AJ Cronin fan
    • 8/31/11

    Amazing the idealist can hold on to their principles until others get onto those who do what they want.A great work based on another AJ Cronin hero.Great acting by all,sleazy administrator,I'm sure their are many more adm as scummy,just not so obvious as that character.Lets remember why we went into nursing,and unite for the good of the patient,and those out for a good paycheck,be honest about it.

  • Hubba Hubba Peter Cushing,Brian Aherne

    • Nurse Annie
    • 8/31/11

    Besides having these gorgeous male actors,it is a great movie.Carole Lombard was truly deserving of all praise she earned,and more.Thanks for including this movie for her salute in Summer Under The Stars.The sister seemed to have a "Licence to kill in Nursing",something I can't understand if someone is adequately trained.But I worked with one totally careless nurse,who could charm the birds out of the trees,so she got away with severe negligence because of a convenient scapegoat that always got kicked because she wasn't part of the clique.

  • Vigil in the Night (1940)

    • James Higgins
    • 3/23/10

    Very sentimental and melodramatic, but Carole Lombard somehow makes it work. It's not a typical role for her, but she's quite good and gives a very sincere and stoic performance. Brian Aherne is charming as always. Good score that fits with the story.

  • Great Entertainment

    • muriel
    • 1/5/10

    This is a great melodrama with a stellar cast. Highly recommended.To answer Liz's question: they count the sponges and instruments because they have to end the operation with the same inventory of object. If a sponge or other object is missing, it could be because they left it inside the patient. Not only is it extremely painful, in the days before antibiotics it could be fatal if it became septic. Even today, it can be very dangerous. The body doesn't like unfamiliar objects inside. Google "foreign object retained after surgery". You've heard the cliche about the surgeon who left his porsche keys inside a patient.

  • Classic movies

    • birgit
    • 9/16/09

    This is just so great when a wonderful book is made into a great movie. I have grown up on old black and white movie, particular love English movies...nothing better!! Let's raise the bar and promote wonderful old movies such as this. Please produce a DVD of this.

  • I love this movie!

    • Liz
    • 1/21/09

    Someone in nursing, tell me..what is the significance in the operating room when they are counting the "sponges" or whatever it was, and Nurse Lee was apparently correct. Why was that such a big deal? The way everyone reacted, it obviously was very important to get the count right.

  • Heartrendering!

    • Dimmie
    • 10/29/08

    Great movie...why can't we have move movies like these on DVD. There are those of us who'd like to share these types of decent films with our children.Loved it...it's one you watch time and time again, it's almost as good as curling up with a good book...They truly don't make them like this any more.

  • An excellent movie for all nurses to watch.

    • Arleen
    • 10/8/07

    I couldn't stop watching this old movie. Anyone who is a nurse today should watch this movie.. just to see what nurses in the 1940's were faced with in their jobs.It is excellent, and I wish it were available to buy sometime soon.

  • Your Name
  • Your Email (optional)
  • Your Location (optional)
      Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
      Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
      Rate the Director
      Rating of the Music Score
      Rating of the Title Sequence
      Screenplay
      Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
      Importance in Cinema history
      Would you recommend for fans of this genre

  • Title of your Review
  • Your Review

    Character Limit! You have reached the 2,000 word character limit for this review.

  • Preview & Submit Cancel Submit Review Go Back
Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

Click the button below to read reviews and see your posting:

Close Detailed Ratings (optional)

*We protect your personal infortmation and will not provide it to anyone without your consent. For a complete explanation, please refer to TCM's Privacy Policy. By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use.