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The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer

The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer(1947)

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NOTES

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The working title of this film was Suddenly It's Spring. In addition to Shirley Temple, RKO borrowed Johnny Sands, producer Dore Schary and writer Sidney Sheldon for the film from David O. Selznick's Vanguard Pictures. The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer was Schary's last personal producing assignment before becoming vice-president in charge of production at RKO. According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, art director Carroll Clark scouted locations for the picture in Lake Arrowhead, CA. It is not known, however, if any scenes were actually shot there. Exterior shots of Beverly Hills High School were included in the picture. According to a pre-release Motion Picture Herald article, a representative of the Woman's Christian Temperence Union in Chicago became upset after reading that Temple was to take her first screen drink in the film and asked RKO executives to eliminate the scene. In the viewed film, Temple does not take any alcoholic drink. Sheldon's script won an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. Modern sources add the following information about the production: In addition to "Suddenly It's Spring," Sheldon's screen story was also titled "Too Good to Be True." Schary objected to the title The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer because he felt it suggested a distasteful sexual relationship, but was overruled by the more commercially minded Selznick. Director Irving Reis collapsed a week after filming had started and was replaced temporarily by Schary. When he returned to the production, Reis concentrated on the technical aspects of the film, while Schary focused on the actors. Modern sources also add that the film earned $5,550,000 at the box office. Cary Grant starred with Shirley Temple in a June 13, 1949 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast of the story. Johnny Sands also reprised his role for the broadcast.