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Gold Diggers of 1933

Gold Diggers of 1933(1933)

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  • Golddiggers of 1933

    • Robin
    • 11/10/13

    I loved it.Of course its not the 1st time I saw it.I love Ruby Keelar&Dick Powell together.They have that spark.Why not show all her movies like a big Ruby Keelar film fest.Im all in.I cant say it enough I love TCM!!!!

  • No More Drew!

    • mugsy
    • 11/5/13

    Dear TCM, You would be doing your viewers a service by terminating Drew Barrymore's contract. She adds nothing to the discussions with Robert Osborne. I don't know how Robert keeps his composure listening to this airhead. During a Saturday night airing of Les Diaboliques, she gushed like a silly teenager about the "Surprise Ending". I had never seen Les Diaboliques, but thanks to Drew, I figured out the ending ten minutes into the movie. Please get rid of her, the only reason she had a career is because of her famous surname.

  • Busby's Best

    • doodles
    • 8/19/13

    Watch for Billy Barty as a lascivious man/baby. Also, that's Etta Moten (Flying Down to Rio, 1933), singing "My Forgotten Man" with Joan Blondell. Beware of post-code and TV edited versions.

  • Gold Diggers of 1933

    • Dashiell B.
    • 2/1/13

    A fine, extravagant follow-up to "42nd Street." Most of the cast from the former film join Blondell, MacMohan & William in a typical backstage story of a musical show, this time added with mistaken identity. Berkeley's numbers are more elaborate than in "42nd Street," with memorable numbers like Rogers singing "We're in the Money" in Pig Latin, while also evoking the times of the Great Depression, emphasized by the "Remember my Forgotten Man" number. Well worth seeing for fans of Berkeley. I give it a 4.5/5.

  • Song in the movie

    • Lois Hunter
    • 2/1/13

    who was the artist, Black Woman that song the A woman Gotta Have A Man". What is the name of the song and the Lady that song. Next time the movie is shown please play her singing the song in its entirety I have seen the movie several times but I really enjoyed the song and I listen to the lyrics.Is there a CD.Lois

  • Wish it was available on DVD!

    • Patty
    • 8/16/11

    Best of the Busby Berkley musicals! Great cast, great songs, great costumes! They don't make them like that anymore, sadly.

  • AWESOME!

    • Alicia
    • 5/24/11

    This movie is the perfect showcase of an all-star cast! The colorful depection of the Depression is chilling even when the overall tone of the movie is upbeat. This movie has worked its way into my favorites list!

  • Gold Diggers of 1933

    • Mark Sutch
    • 4/12/11

    ***1/2

  • Just One Scene

    • Bruce Reber
    • 3/18/10

    I have never seen "Gold Diggers of 1933" all the way through, but I recognize one scene, the famous musical number "We're In The Money". It's also featured in "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967) as the film playing in the theater where Bonnie, Clyde and C.W. Moss hide out after pulling a bank robbery and their first killing, and "We're In The Money" is playing on the screen. The song itself was meant to lift people's spirits and provide audiences some escapism in the depths of the Great Depression.

  • GOLD for any year!

    • Mikey Lacy
    • 10/23/09

    While it may not be the "show of 1000 miracles" this is timeless entertainment. The cast is supurb, notably the wise-cracking tossed around by Aline MacMahon. She is even better here with this skill than that of Joan Blondell!! That is difficult for me to admit being a devoted lifelong Blondell fan. I began enjoying this movie when I first saw 1967's "Bonnie and Clyde" and while in a movie house we see portions of the "We're in the Money" sequence. I knew I had to someday see this film and finally was able to see it on the big screen in a revival house in the mid 1970s. I have loved it since then and never tire of it. The musical numbers need no comment from me; they live on as mind-blowing flights of fancy. The songs and the music cannot be beat (I love the strident sound of the music from this period in Warner's pictures). One thing I have noticed on each viewing is the gown Joan Blondell wears in the nightclub scene. Fashion lovers do not miss this stunning beaded creation. Perhaps the greatest compliment I can suggest for this film, is when one evening my companion who at 25 is half my age, thouroughly loved the movie praising it with the modern slang of a 25 year old! The next day he was humming and singing "Pettin' in the Park" all day! This is a movie not to miss!

  • One of Busby Berkeley's Best

    • Marie
    • 7/30/09

    Joan Blondell's portrayal of a showgirl with a heart of gold is both charming and convincing. She completely outshines her female costars in this comedic farce of three "gold diggers" who manage to marry rich men. Yet this movie is more than a love story; it is powerful social commentary. Besides the obvious message that the rich have a responsibility to help the economically displaced of the Depression(funding the show, providing jobs for all those cast members), the movie promotes the re-evaluation of previously learned responses to socioeconomic status. The rich brothers and their lawyer learn through the women they come to love that it is a mistake to judge someone by appearance alone, a lesson that extends to the men marching in breadlines. If a showgirl is really a decent woman who works in show business because that's the best (or only) job available, perhaps the homeless bum on the street is worth a second look as well. After all, he may be a decorated war veteran.

  • The Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

    • Jay
    • 6/24/09

    Outstanding classic musical, amazing choreography and a wonderful cast. Imaginative, great songs and musical numbers. Highly entertaining and a joy from start to finish.

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