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Double Wedding

Double Wedding(1937)

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The working title of the film was Three's Company. According to a news item in Film Daily, Robert Young was at one time cast in the film. He probably was cast in the role that went to John Boles. A Hollywood Reporter news item in mid-July 1937 noted that Robert Benchley was to have a featured role in the picture, but he was not in the released film. Other Film Daily news items noted that portions of the film were shot on location in Santa Barbara at the "winter" estate of C. A. Noble, a "Milwaukee banker and manufacturing tycoon." Additional location work was done in Carmel-By-the Sea by director Richard Thorpe, accompanied by photographer Joseph Ruttenberg and Ruttenberg's assistants, Herman Fisher and Sig Kaufman. According to Hollywood Reporter news item on June 28, 1937, production was partially shut down on Double Wedding following the June 7, 1937 death of M-G-M star Jean Harlow, to whom William Powell was engaged. In the news item, it was announced that Harold Rosson (who was married to Harlow from 1933 to 1934) was replacing William Daniels as the cameraman, however, Rosson's name is also listed on early Hollywood Reporter production charts. Only Daniels' name is credited onscreen and in reviews, and the extent of Rosson's work in the completed film has not been determined. Following the completion of this film, Powell made The Baroness and the Butler, on loan to Twentieth Century-Fox, and did not return to M-G-M until late 1939 when he made Another Thin Man with Myrna Loy. News items from late 1937 through 1938 indicate that grief over Harlow's death and his own surguries, (which modern sources have said were necessary to stop the spread of rectal cancer) forced Powell to refrain from working extensively for almost two years.