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Death on the Diamond

Death on the Diamond(1934)

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  • Style of the times

    • hockeyfan
    • 8/13/13

    Just watched for the first time. This movie is what I consider to be a style of the times movie. It has all the elements of a Bowery Boys movie. It is virtually cartoon style. The acting is wooden and the characters are barely even one dimensional. This type of movie is purely a filler to keep people in the seats at the time it was released. I know that the studios used to have to pump them out and I suppose they still make them like this but with bigger budgets. I like to see both ends of the spectrum in order to know what makes this industry.

  • wrong ball park

    • Chuck
    • 8/8/13

    A bit corny, but still fun to watch. Be sure to catch the Cards and the Reds playing at Wrigley Field in the final game.

  • Memories of Sportsman's Park

    • D. J. Fone
    • 4/16/12

    Having attended a dozen games at the old ballpark as a boy, it was a thrill to see it in the movie again. Yet, it really requires a major suspension of disbelief to get through the movie without laughing at some of the preposterous tropes.It was startling to see a marksman atop the right-field pavilion roof where so many later Stan Musial homers landed, ready to gun down a baserunner before he scored.And the way Robert Young sniffs out, and stops, the killer is downright side-splitting, though it was meant to be taken seriously.It's probably a good thing I never saw this film as a boy, or I'd have been a nervous wreck attending games at the old ballpark.

  • Impossibly Implausible But Still Sublime

    • Andy Moursund
    • 7/1/10

    Death on the Diamond has everything: Close-ups of the old Sportsman's Park, where the Cardinals played for 81 years; actors wearing the real Cardinals' uniforms; a plot so ridiculously contrived that it rivals Reefer Madness for its sidesplitting improbabilities---the game goes on with barely an interruption after each of three successive murders!; and an early look at Jim Anderson / Marcus Welby / Robert Young. In spite of its low budget B-movie quality, I'd rather watch this film any day over the vast majority of overly literary baseball movies of recent vintage. Unless you're expecting something along the lines of Field of Dreams, you can't help but love this movie.

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