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The Tenderfoot

The Tenderfoot(1932)

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  • please reschedule

    • dressscholar
    • 7/28/14

    I was really hoping to see this rarely viewed film, which was removed in lieu of more commonly scheduled films for the James Garner day on TCM. Many thanks.

  • Ginger Rogers Needs The Money!

    • JD
    • 6/6/11

    Joe E. Brown stars as a cowboy who arrives in New York, stumbles upon a couple of unethical and nearly bankrupt businessmen, and romances Ginger Rogers along the way. Brown, a street wise cowboy from Texas, comes to New York to make good and at random meets a man who's involved in show business. The businessman, played by Lew Cody, is along with his partner in debt. They find out that the cowboy has with him a very large sum of cash, his and his mother's live savings, and decide to con him out of his money. The two men work as producers for their stage show business, and they convince the cowboy to buy into their newest stage show which is currently in production. The cowboy, who was somewhat street smart at the first of the film, suddenly for no real reason becomes gullible. This would appear to be due to the fact that the beautiful Ginger Rogers is employed by this production company. Ginger helps her bosses to con the cowboy, but eventually feels bad about this and confesses. The cowboy, who by now is basically stuck with a show that was a complete failure, then makes things that much worse. However, all is not lost as the cowboy accidentally arrives at a solution to his now majority owned show. This film stars Joe E. Brown, and if you're a fan of his very stylistic style of comedy then you know what you're getting. If not, then the act starts to become slightly old as the movie moves along. Ginger Rogers, in one of her early films, is obviously a good reason to watch any movie and co-stars in a role that was typical of her early 1930's work. Lew Cody does a nice job in this film, as do the other few supporting actors including Nat Pendleton. It's a decent little entertaining movie, for what it is, and features a few nice scenes as well as some funny moments from Joe E. Brown. The movie drags a bit, and the parts are much better than the whole, but the vivacious Ginger Rogers make this a movie worth watching if just for her alone.

  • the tenderfoot

    • ian gemmell
    • 10/30/06

    your review is little more than a plot sumary,including the twists and ending. even more disgraceful, you have mistaken the name of the hero: it is Calvin Jones not Pete Jones. How is it possible to make a mistake of this size?

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