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Royal Wedding

Royal Wedding(1951)

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Royal Wedding A brother-and-sister musical... MORE > $11.95 Regularly $10.99 Buy Now

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  • royal wedding

    • kevin sellers
    • 3/29/19

    With the exception of the famous ceiling dance (which is actually my second favorite Astaire dance number in this film) and Fred's practice session in the ship's gym (my first) this movie and almost everyone in it is an exercise in cheerful, energetic vapidity, with Lawford, Powell, Wynn and Winston's kid coming in for special empty mention. Astaire as always seems to somehow rise above the nothingness. About the only thing that piqued my interest is how the Hays Office seemed ok with a brother and sister act that pretended to be lovers. Shows how you can fool ol Will if you hide your kink beneath a "wholesome" genre like the MGM musical. Give it a C. PS... Uncharacteristically cheesy production from the firm of Freed and Donen. Didya notice the palm trees in the background of the "London" street where Astaire and Churchill first meet? Oh well, it was Donen's first film on his own and presumably the guy was either too excited to notice or lacked the clout he would later possess to pitch a fit about it.

  • ok..get it over with.

    • a.morris
    • 12/14/17

    if you profess to be a movie fan.. you should really try to see at least one movie of every major genre.. to my words..i have said that. i am not much for song and dance.. but I have seen a few. just pick one if you are going to try it.. you will not lose too much doing that. whether it is Astaire or Kelley or the Nicholas brothers.. you probably will like the foot work. this story ..you might like ..you might not. the lead does have some pretty good dance numbers.. and it is a musical. it is no movie version of paint your wagon.. and I will leave it at that.

  • Royal Wedding

    • Michael Whitty
    • 5/10/17

    A carefree musical of a brother-and-sister song-and-dance team who goes to London at the time of Queen Elizabeth's wedding. The songs are good and when we see Fred Astaire dancing on the ceiling with the trick photography we see a neat effect the movies can surprise us with. This scene was also a part of "That's Entertainment" as "Royal Wedding" was good entertainment.

  • awful movie!

    • eliot fish
    • 5/21/16

    this is one bad astair movie. a brother and sister who do romantic songs and dances with each other? fred meets a girl and does no musical numbers with her? jane has many beaus and has a shipboard romance with a man and later when they meet in a hotel they act as if they are children? fred is too old for this part to be jane"sbrother. the song and dances are atrocious! the story is stupid! what a poor excuse for a movie musical! and they say torch song is bad! no wonder astair wanted to retire. no stars!

  • Haiti

    • Ron P.
    • 5/17/16

    My favorite part in the entire film is the musical number "I Left my Hat In Haiti",it is superbly arranged and performed and the melody is great.

  • Just so-so; 3 out of 5

    • el debbo
    • 10/28/13

    I love a good musical but this one didn't ring any bells for me. Like another review, didn't care for Ms. Churchill in her role as Astaire's love interest. Frosty and unappealing. She looked like an auburn Rosemary Clooney. And the storyline was kind of trite, tiresome. I thought it was a stretch for Jane Powell to be Astaire's sister. On the positive side, it's pretty technicolor and Peter Lawford is wonderful to behold. Sigh. Also, it was nice to see Powell dancing with Astaire... he was sometimes paired with dancers who were as tall or taller, so the women spend the whole time doing a crouch-dance. Like Cyd Charisse.Astaire Powell looked good together and she could definitely keep up with him.

  • Royal Wedding

    • Sandy
    • 3/7/10

    Excellent movie because of Fred Astaire and Jane Powell. The two outstanding parts are the dance scene between Fred and Jane to "How Could You Believe Me When I Said I Loved You When You Know I've Been A Liar All My Life". Jane, you were fabulous and an excellent dancer! And, of course, the other is Fred dancing on "the ceiling" in this movie is a classic that will forever be remembered. He was the BEST dancer ever! They do not make movies any where near this excellent caliber anymore. Thank you to all those in the golden age of Hollywood for making such movies that I can show my children and future grandchildren without telling them to cover their eyes and ears. I gave it four stars because I didn't like Miss Churchhill in this role. They should have picked a better co-star for Fred.

  • A Memorable Stunt

    • Keith Connes
    • 2/15/09

    Although my favorite Astaire films are those he made with Ginger Rogers in the 30s and 40s, "Royal Wedding" has a special place in my heart and mind for the astounding four-minute sequence during which Astaire defies gravity and dances on the walls and ceiling of his room. Yes, it was a trick, but done seamlessly (without computerized special effects) as well as imaginatively and, because it was Astaire, elegantly. Frankly, I don't recall or care about much of the rest of the film, but I will always remember that number, "You're All the World to Me."

  • The Best Man

    • Bob Hendrick
    • 1/25/09

    Over the years there have been many great hoofers in films; Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, Michael Kidd , Bob Fosse---the list goes on. Then there's Fred Astaire. In my opinion, he was in a class by himself; and this was my favorite Astaire film. All of his song and dance numbers in this film should be put in a time capsule (remember the dance on the ceiling?). The pleasant surprise in this movie is Jane Powell; she holds her own with Fred, especially the "Dirty Rotten Liar" number; and that voice! I never tire of watching this masterpiece by Stanley Donen.

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