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Storm over Tibet

Storm over Tibet(1952)

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  • Haunting film

    • Robert Garfias
    • 10/28/09

    I saw this film when it came out in 1952. As I recall I saw it in the old elegant Fox theater in San Francisco. I only saw it once but I remember it and have wanted to see it again since then. It may be because so much of the 50s was dreary. We would often travel across town to the rare showing of art house films. Rashomon came out the year before I think. There was something dreamlike about this picture, not over done and over stated like much Hollywood fare at the time. Like many things from that time, it left me with a feeling that I wanted to see it again.

  • Enjoyable B-movie adventure

    • Donald John Long
    • 2/23/09

    This is an enjoyable B-movie adventure with an intriguing, interesting mystery story, above average plot and character development, all bound up in your typical black & white Columbia B-movie production values for the 1950s. Rex Reason is outstanding in the lead role, his first time before the cameras, effortlessly appearing like a matinee idol movie star of the era without overacting or seeming pretentious. Diana Douglas is good as his love interest. Some interesting supporting character actors for those who look for them in oldies like this, and a fine music score.

  • ADVENTURE IN THE FROZEN HIMALAYAS!

    • Donald John Long
    • 2/23/09

    STORM OVER TIBET represents the realization of a 20-year-old dream by independent documentary filmmaker Harald Dyrenfurth, and British film producer Andrew Marton: to successfully utilize live on-location stock footage from Dyrenfurth's unfinished documentary titled "MASK OF THE HIMALAYAS", shot in 1933-1934 during an unsuccessful expedition by his entourage to scale Mount Everest. Some of this footage was found and used by legendary film director Frank Capra in his classic fantasy, LOST HORIZON (Columbia, 1937). Fast forward to 1951: Producers Andrew Marton, Laszlo Benedek and Ivan Tors incorporate as Summit Productions to make a new movie using the old footage and new studio production is mounted (excuse the pun). Rex Reason is cast in the lead role, his first, after screen tests. His love interest is Diana Douglas, then wife of star Kirk Douglas and mother of Michael Douglas. A minor league "LOST HORIZON", this film is more than just an old B-movie, it features a hauntingly beautiful music score by classical composers Arthur Honegger and Leith Stevens, magnificent B&W cinematography, and a solid script with fine acting by an ensemble cast. In fact, the stock footage Capra used is also in this film, with the result that Rex Reason appears to be wandering in the snowclad Himalayas just as Ronald Colman had in the Capra film. Rex made an auspicious debut performance, and went on to star in many other films of the 1950s such as the classic sci-fi picture THIS ISLAND EARTH. The film is a fine example of typical classic studio entertainment. Perhaps Columbia Classics Home Video will someday release it for the world to enjoy again.

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