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Hamlet

Hamlet(1948)

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  • Epilogue, continuing synopsis

    • William Fox
    • 2/27/14

    ... To ensure checkmate, the king plots an additional ploy, with another poison. Known only to him, it becomes a doubly ironic, fatal conceit. To heighten the court's entertainment, the king proudly proposes a high-stakes wager. "I bet this royal ring, worn by previous kings, a pearl beyond price, to the first duelist to score a hit."Hamlet's sword pinks Laertes first. So the king stands up respecting Hamlet, offering a great golden, wine goblet in which he drops the pearl ring. Hamlet, focused on winning the duel, defers the wine offer. Instead, the queen gets the goblet and drinks. Looking disturbed, the king laments, "It's too late." Hamlet is distracted. Vengeful Laertes leaps forward with his poison-tipped sword, stabbing Hamlet's arm. Shocked, he fights back, knocking Laertes' sword out of his hand. Hamlet steps on the sword, but honorably offers his own sword. Then Hamlet picks up Laertes' sword and resumes swashbuckling, stabbing Laertes with his own poison-tipped sword. The Queen collapses from the poison in the ring. Horrified Laertes falls to the ground, saying that the king is to blame. Laertes further confesses that he is dying from his own, poisoned-tipped sword, switched in the duel by Hamlet, displaying honor and sportsmanship. Thirdly, Hamlet himself is dying from Laertes' opportunistic, sneak attack, when Hamlet was districted. Knowing the king was the first and most frequent fouler, causing multiple deaths, Hamlet stabs the King several times. In conclusion, as all of the royal family members are dying, an old odor and a new order are settling in Denmark. 557 words writ by Will Fox

  • Play within play

    • William Fox
    • 2/27/14

    Psychologically tortured Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, learns to avenge his father's murder. Swearing to his father's ghost, Hamlet is going to revenge his father by killing Claudius, his uncle and now the King, married to his widowed mother. Something stinks in Denmark. To achieve revenge, Prince Hamlet pretends madness. Alone, the Prince thinks aloud in a series of serious soliloquies about life and death. Then he proposes a play, recruits players, directs, and performs in his play, ostensibly to entertain the somber royal court. An intentional pun on court, leading actor and director (both Hamlet and Olivier) performs a play within a play. While hinting how his uncle, now the king, killed Hamlet's father, the former king, Hamlet simultaneously simulates a court of justice, a court of public opinion, which is the royal court. So the king and queen are provoked in his play. Now the king plans Hamlet's murder, too. Loving her son, the queen becomes depressed. In the Prince's plotting process, his revenge delayed, unintended consequences result. Unanticipated people suffer and die: First, a trusted royal-family advisor and then Hamlet's beloved sister, Ophelia. She is so saddened by the losses of both her recently dead father and her loved brother into madness, so she, alone and afraid, goes mad and kills herself.Hamlet confesses to his troubled mother; he must be cruel to be kind. Puns as parables, Hamlet entertains himself, engaging in doubletalk, that only he understands fully.A lethal, royal chess game ensues. The anticipated future king, Hamlet, challenges the murderous, present king. Claudius plots Hamlet's death, first at sea, using pirates. Then the king galvanizes Laertes, Hamlet's jealous young brother into treacherously killing his brother, the future king with poison, while performing a mock duel before the court.To ensure checkmate, the king plots an additional ploy, with another poison. Known only to him, it becomes a doubly ironic, fatal conceit.

  • Expanded Synopsis

    • William Fox
    • 2/27/14

    Psychologically tortured Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, learns to avenge his father's murder. Swearing to his father's ghost, Hamlet is going to revenge his father by killing Claudius, his uncle and now the King, married to his widowed mother. Something stinks in Denmark. To achieve revenge, Prince Hamlet pretends madness. Alone, the Prince thinks aloud in a series of serious soliloquies about life and death. Then he proposes a play, recruits players, directs, and performs in his play, ostensibly to entertain the somber royal court. An intentional pun on court, leading actor and director (both Hamlet and Olivier) performs a play within a play. While hinting how his uncle, now the king, killed Hamlet's father, the former king, Hamlet simultaneously simulates a court of justice, a court of public opinion, which is the royal court. So the king and queen are provoked in his play. Now the king plans Hamlet's murder, too. Loving her son, the queen becomes depressed. In the Prince's plotting process, his revenge delayed, unintended consequences result. Unanticipated people suffer and die: First, a trusted royal-family advisor and then Hamlet's beloved sister, Ophelia. She is so saddened by the losses of both her recently dead father and her loved brother into madness, so she, alone and afraid, goes mad and kills herself.Hamlet confesses to his troubled mother; he must be cruel to be kind. Puns as parables, Hamlet entertains himself, engaging in doubletalk, that only he understands fully.A lethal, royal chess game ensues. The anticipated future king, Hamlet, challenges the murderous, present king. Claudius plots Hamlet's death, first at sea, using pirates. Then the king galvanizes Laertes, Hamlet's jealous young brother into treacherously killing his brother, the future king with poison, while performing a mock duel before the court. To ensure checkmate, the king plots an additional ploy, with another poison. Known only to him, it becomes a doubly ironic, fatal conceit.

  • Hamlet

    • Dashiell B.
    • 4/5/13

    At the 21st Academy Awards, this adaptation of Shakespeare's story proved that the English can make a Best Picture Winner. Olivier became the first performer to direct himself in an Oscar-winning performance, doing outstanding work as the Danish Prince, Simmons was nominated for her supporting performance. Won two additional Oscars for striking B/W costumes and production design. Although drastically shortened, this is still a compelling and magnificent adaptation of one of Shakespeare's greatest tragedy's. I give it a 4.5/5.

  • Hamlet through one director's eye

    • Oliver Cutshaw
    • 4/3/13

    Very good adaptation, but as with any film it reflects the director's vision of Hamlet. All very dark, murky, POV at times. Great cast and excellent film, but I always found it a bit plodding.Still it has many excellent qualities and I would certainly say to any Shakespeare buff take a look. Some films age well and some don't. For example the Romeo and Juliet version from MGM with Norma Shearer in the late 1930's now seems rather hammy. 60 years after it was released, this film may not seem all that fresh, innovative, and vital to many contemporary viewers. But it has interesting sets, style and performances, so hang in there, you may like it. (Young Peter Cushing of Hammer fame can be seen late in the film as an obnoxious gadfly courtier, and the young Jean Simmons is very good, very lovely.)

  • Hamlet?

    • Steve Myers
    • 3/30/13

    Much over rated version of Hamlet. Olivier plays the prince as a forty-yearold homosexual. Other actors passable. Olivier pronounces Elizabethan English with an OxBridge or Upper U accent. Skip it and read the play.

  • Hamlet (1948

    • Jay Higgins
    • 12/14/08

    Brilliant filming of the Shakespeare play, the acting by all is incredible. Effective cinematography, well written and directed. Creative art direction. A masterpiece, won the Oscar for best picture.

  • A MASTERPIECE

    • JASON
    • 5/14/07

    THIS IS THE GREATIST HAMLET EVER TO GRACE THE SILVER SCREEN.LAURENCE OLIVER LIVES UP TO HIS CREDIT AS THE WORLDS GREATIST BARD.I SUGGEST THAT EVERYONE SHOULD VIEW IT.

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