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Holiday for Sinners

Holiday for Sinners(1952)

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  • holiday for sinners

    • kevin sellers
    • 11/4/15

    This is a movie about a doctor who has to choose between practicing medicine in New Orleans or India. Honestly. I swear. That's the conflict thought up by the usually fine screenwriter, A.I. Bezzerides, who obviously dreamed this one up while at Santa Anita, or in Palm Springs for a tennis weekend. Along the way we're treated to various forms of overacting (Keenan Wynn as the standard punch drunk fighter, William Campbell as every cliche of a sleazy newsman and Edith Barrett as per usual) and underacting (Gig Young, phoning it in, and Richard Anderson, dull as angel food cake as a priest.) Janice Rule is decent as a Garden District socialite who rebels, but the only actors who stand out are Will Wright and Frank DeKova as an odd pair of gangster/hit men, what with Wright resembling Death with a cigar in Its mouth and DeKova looking like he just got off a Sicilian tramp steamer. Gerald Mayer's direction is clunky and makes minimal use of one of the most visually striking American cities. (i.e. stock footage of Mardi Gras, interspersed with cheesy studio sets.) Give it a C minus. P.S. This is a film both set in and concerning New Orleans and Gig Young and Janice Rule go to a cafe and order coffee and DOUGHNUTS!! Yep. That about sums up this film for me.

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