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The Sniper

The Sniper(1952)

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  • Arthur Franz thumbs up Richard Kiley thumbs down

    • DON RILEY
    • 4/2/16

    The negative first Richard Kiley is far to preachy and his clean cut Broadway Musical appeal just seem to take away from the reality of this film. That may be too critical, but its my feeling. I found his role to serve the purpose of narration and psychological sermon, more than relationship. Arthur Franz shows how reaction more than action can work. Most of his best work in this film is based on his reactions and the strength of those reactions. I thought his acting really worked here. It was a huge plus for this film. Also he worked the script well because he connects to absolutely "no one" in this film. His one safety net phone call connection was "away and unavailable". He is aloof and shows no inter-personal connections, to a number of the films other characters who are basically " not worth liking or knowing ". So, the viewer can actually feel quite a bit of sympathy for the murderer, although their better judgement tells them they should not. I could watch this more than once.

  • the sniper

    • kevin sellers
    • 4/1/16

    Although it's no threat to overtake "Dirty Harry" as the best San Francisco, serial killer/police procedural, this film does have some definite things going for it. There's the wonderful location shooting, (probably the best use of this beautiful, yet disturbing, city other than "Vertigo") tight, well paced direction by the usually pedestrian Edward Dmytryk, two legitimately great scenes (i.e. when the sniper, paradoxically using baseballs rather than a gun, assaults a woman on a ducking stool in an amusement park, and the ending, where the sniper, cradling his rifle, expresses relief at finally being apprehended) a great performance from Arthur Franz in the title role, (guy does frustration exploding into rage quite well) and a good, low key, spare screenplay by Harry Brown, with the exception, of course, as previous reviewer Scott pointed out, of the boring speech by the police psychiatrist. I could, however, have done without the misogyny on the part of Brown and Dmytryk. Did you notice that ALL the women characters n this film are either annoying, bitchy, nosey, or snobby? And there is an attempt on the part of Brown to indict the psychiatric/medical profession as culpable in the killer's misdeeds that is as half hearted as it is irritating. So, let's give "Sniper" a solid B. P.S. Wonder how eager HUAC rat Adolphe Menjou, who plays the police lieutenant, took to being directed by first jailed and then reluctant HUAC rat Dmytryk? Now, there's a crime drama I'd REALLY like to see.

  • This movies needs to be released on DVD

    • Joan
    • 7/14/09

    Fantastic movie with great shots of San Francisco. Arthur Franz is an under appreciated character actor who shines in this role as a tormented person who takes out his pain on innocent people.

  • well written story

    • steven mckeachie
    • 6/22/09

    I loved this movie, and seems ahead of its time with the subject matter related too a psychological disturbed man who desperately wants help for his increasing duality with his rage and anger for being rejected by people in general and targets brunettes as the object of his increasing anger and hatred but can get no help for himself too stop these urges too hurt and too kill but receives none until he is way over the edge and is trying too come back. I recognized many of the actors especiallya young richard kiley and i swear the teen brought into custody was present day actor and country singer,Randy travis. Am I correct. And i noticed a supposed young girl at the scene of the 1st murder who looked alot like "jeff" from the classic tv series "Lassie". Please feel free too respond/ Steven M

  • Outstanding filmnoir!

    • Barry
    • 4/7/09

    When I first saw this film, I was completely amazed by the realistic special effects, which, at that time,were remarkable. The shots alone make this a knock-out. I agree,this film should be on DVD.

  • Really Great Thriller

    • Wayne Frese
    • 10/13/08

    It really shows the reality of a poor lonely individual who has been hurt by women and there seems no way out except to commit crime. We need more films and stories of this nature.

  • Poor misunderstood Eddie...

    • JMW
    • 6/29/07

    Well, boys, I love a good slice of noir as much as the next hard-boiled dame, but, wow, this is the most agressively misogynistic film I've seen on TCM since "While the City Sleeps."

  • Great thriller!

    • Mychal Bowden
    • 4/30/07

    I'm surprised that Columbia has not released this on DVD. For such a risque film for the time it was made, it packs a wallop. Arthur Franz is at his best as the title character while Adolphe Menjou gives a strong performance as the detective trying to find him. Please have Columbia consider this for DVD...I would be glad to put out my money for this. Before you place a home video vote for this, see the film. Believe me, it will blow you away.

  • Good, But Not Great!

    • Scott Dwyer
    • 3/6/07

    Interesting and well done film. The shots of mid-century San Francisco alone make the film worth seeing. The monologues by the police psychiatrist was a bit preachy and could easily have been cut. Music was great and some of the scenes were highly original. However, I never felt any tension or suspense.

  • Very good movie!

    • Sonnie
    • 2/28/07

    Keep reaching into your old bag of black and whites. I have never seen this movie in all of my TCM years. This movie belongs with the old gangster James Cagney movies that are unduplicable. The old are the best and we want to see them. Please keep digging into the past good old Hollywood years. What a pleasure they are.

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