skip navigation
The Arrangement

The Arrangement(1969)

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

DVDs from TCM Shop

The Arrangement A car crash causes a rich man... MORE > $13.46 Regularly $17.99 Buy Now

USER REVIEWS

user reviews

See Detailed Ratings
    Acting of Lead Performers
    Acting of Supporting Cast
    Director
    Music Score
    Title Sequence
  • No Ratings Available Add Yours Now
    Screenplay
    Cinematography
    Historical Importance
    Would You Recommend?
  • 0 Member Ratings

Add your ratings! Each of the detailed ratings you select will result in a cumulative score for this film.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

    Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
    Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
    Rate the Director
    Rating of the Music Score
    Rating of the Title Sequence
    Screenplay
    Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
    Importance in Cinema history
    Would you recommend for fans of this genre
Submit Ratings Cancel Write a Review Read Reviews

*By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use. TCM will use your personal information consistent with our Privacy Policy

NO REVIEWS AVAILABLE

The title has not been reviewed. Be the first to write a review by clicking here to start.

  • the arrangement

    • kevin sellers
    • 4/8/17

    Buried deep within this too long, over written, hysterically pitched film is an interesting character study of a sell out, but writer director Elia Kazan keeps it well hidden, exploring it in depth only in the movie's most powerful scene, the argument between Kirk Douglas and Deborah Kerr in the hotel room. Instead we are treated to plenty of breast beating and agonizing by Douglas' tortured Mad Man as well as copious amounts of screaming, snarling and scolding from Richard Boone as Douglas' dad and Faye Dunaway as his mistress. Indeed, the only lead member of the cast who does not engage in scenery chewing is, unsurprisingly, Deborah Kerr, for my dough the finest film actress between the Hepburn/Davis and Streep eras (Joanne Woodward fans may disagree). Also off putting is Kazan's penchant for caricature in place of nuance as in his cartoonish depiction of Hume Cronyn's lawyer, Harold Gould's psychologist, Michael Murphy's priest and of course Charles Drake's ad exec. And the scenes where the adult Douglas communes with his alter ego as well as his youthful self and parents is incredibly amateurish when compared to similar treatments in say "Wild Strawberries" and "Crimes And Misdemeanors." But the film's biggest failure is its inability to engage with, much less answer, the question Why Did Eddie Sell Out? It's suggested that it was his dad's fault for not letting him go to college, but then that line of inquiry is dropped in favor of Douglas' mom being the one to blame for not raising him to stand up to his tyrannical father. Never is it suggested by Kazan, who wrote the novel upon which his film is based, that Eddie himself had a big part in his materialistic downfall. But then ol Elia was never very good at accepting responsibility for questionable actions, now, was he? Give it a C.

  • Want to see this remade with better direction

    • Cee
    • 5/7/13

    There's something off about this film. The direction, the pacing or just the convoluted plot . It all feels so forced and in so doing loses a deep and important concept that is still relevant for our time. Gwen is so cheap that there is hardly any empathy for her. It was supposed to be highly sexual for the time but came off desperate and loveless instead. Some director should take a shot at remaking this book.

  • Your Name
  • Your Email (optional)
  • Your Location (optional)
      Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
      Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
      Rate the Director
      Rating of the Music Score
      Rating of the Title Sequence
      Screenplay
      Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
      Importance in Cinema history
      Would you recommend for fans of this genre

  • Title of your Review
  • Your Review

    Character Limit! You have reached the 2,000 word character limit for this review.

  • Preview & Submit Cancel Submit Review Go Back
Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

Click the button below to read reviews and see your posting:

Close Detailed Ratings (optional)

*We protect your personal infortmation and will not provide it to anyone without your consent. For a complete explanation, please refer to TCM's Privacy Policy. By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use.