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Sky Giant

Sky Giant(1938)

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    • 10/24/12

  • Great Vintage Airplanes

    • Ted
    • 10/22/12

    While it is a weak plot and a slow mover, the time period (1938) and the airplanes involved make a worth while movie for the aviaiton enthusiast. Some very good airborne shots.

  • Frogmen?

    • Kathy
    • 10/22/12

    Happened upon this movie about 45 minutes in & right off noticed that whomever did the casting for the men in it-must have LOVED frogs. Check out the profiles of them-all have practically flat, slanted down noses!! I also realized that Joan Fontaine has one of those permanent Elvis style sneers....this is the youngest I have seen her & having seen her in later movies...shows it is indeed permanent. I'm so glad the obvious heavy makeup from the 1938 movie soon eased into a less theatrical look for both men & women. In the breakup scene at night on the porch Joan's false eyelashes in profile & backlit looked to be about an inch long. She looked silly encased in the coat with the enormous fur collar too, being so popular a style, it can be seen as part of the wardrobe in movies of the era- on nightgown robes & coats over & over. The next cockpit scene shows the raccoon eye makeup on the pilots, as well as the eyebrow liner thick & as dark as magic marker. I LOVED watching the special effect of the downed pilots "walking" in the freezing wilderness-swaying side to side on a set-...then, as night fell & around the little fire, one pilot looks towards the fire & his half frozen appearance was accomplished by applying a massive amount of clown white lipstick to his mouth, which changes it's effect as he moves or the lighting does!! Oh my gosh! What a hoot that was..when the 2 pilots finally see lights after wandering the snowy terrain, there is music that would normally indicate the end of a movie-not the scene. All in all, this movie is great for artists who do portraits to be amused by & make up artists to learn what NOT to do. Getting to watch the greats & getting to critique the not so greats & having TCM run them all is so wonderful...its on my TV whenever the TV is on.

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