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The Hucksters

The Hucksters(1947)

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  • A Harbinger of Things to Come

    • Dan Desjardins
    • 2/13/16

    It is notable this film was made within two years of the end of the second world war where already we see elements of decline in post-war America. Victor Norman (Clark Gable) arranges to meet Kay Dorrance (Deborah Kerr) at "The Blue Penguin," a resort hotel on the Maine Coast Victor remembered from only four years earlier and spoken of to Kay in glowing, poetic terms. But when getting there ahead of Kay to prepare the way, he finds the hotel run down, the staff not having saved Room 37 on the far side from his room as asked (he was informed there were people who made reservations but wouldn't show up), and when Victor sees the room he is disappointed, gives the proprietor $5 to get some flowers to which the proprietor tells him he could pick his own painting a rather stark picture all the former niceties and politeness had faded, gone away; while down in the lobby there was now jive music, people of questionable character; and it is the same scene Kay notices when she arrives, young folk congregated at the juke box, including the bell hop with his coat un-buttoned, hair not combed, who only turns to pay her attention once she rings the bell at the counter. And when she goes into the room, she sees the frayed curtains, and the view of the bay through the window revealing hap-hazard boats, some sunken and in a state of disrepair, her room not on the far side but next to his, and the question asked whether she wants the connecting door unlocked all these unwanted changes to standards and proprieties of a former time suggesting a time to come, a time that is with us now, only moreso. Yet being the decent woman Deborah Kerr portrays, she is not sympathetic but duly disheartened and leaves as we should all do from shoddy art. Not that this film is a case in point, though certainly not one of the best for its cast of great actors, but better, much better than those we would be inundated with in the coming decades.

  • ethics

    • george snedker
    • 9/19/12

    gable backed by great cast delivers in drama about ethics in big business.one of his most unrated films.

  • The Hucksters (1947)

    • Mr. Blandings
    • 8/18/12

    A very, very good film ... and just as timely today as it was back then. I always used to think Gable didn't do any really good work after the war but this movie proved me wrong. He's in top form playing a nice guy who's slightly rough around the edges. Kerr is good too, and there's quite the supporting cast--Greenstreet, Arnold, Menjou, Wynn, O'Hanlon. The film runs a tad too long and I wish Kay's two children put in an appearance near the end, for consistency's sake, but there's nothing like watching a meaningful, well-acted movie with an important message. There's no reason why ethical behavior can't be incorporated into a business, but when a person is faced with unethical practices in their job they have a choice to make--either join the corrupted or simply walk away. I can only speak from my own personal experiences but when it happened to me recently I chose to walk away from it and I've never looked back. Contrary to what the spin-doctors of society tell you, there ARE more important things than money. Those obsessed with their materialism and greed usually end up leading short, friendless, and empty lives. You can't take your money with you, so nurture what you do take with you--your spirit.

  • The Dream Team

    • Mike
    • 8/13/12

    An essential, if just for the casting. Kerr and Gardner would be later paired in Iguana. Wynn, Greenstreet, Menjou and Arnold and cast make this one special. Well directed by Gable specialist Conway.

  • Welcome to the U.S. Ms. Kerr!

    • Steimo2
    • 8/16/09

    American movie audience's are "properly" introduced to the talent's of the lovely British actress, Deborah Kerr!Kudo's to MGM for signing this talented beauty!Adolph Menjou is as good as ever!

  • Not Lancaster & Kerr

    • Teddy Kaye
    • 5/4/09

    This movie has two stories. One story is the Gable & Kerr romance, which is not Lancaster & Kerr. The woman, Kerr, is a lady, so she can't stay over with the man, Gable, but she comes awfully close to staying, two or three times. Kerr is somewhat aggressive in letting Gable pursue her, so she seems right for Gable.The other story line is Gable in the radio advertising business dealing with a demanding and crude client, Greenstreet. Gable is confident and cocky is his role. For most of the movie, Gable puts up with Greenstreet's antics because he needs the income. Given today's economic recession, you can relate to Gable's plight. To me, Gable is too strong, too smart and too much of a born leader to take so long to standing up to his awful client and walk away to an uncertain economic future with Kerr, at his side. Both storylines haven't aged well, but Gable is a star and he's very watchable.

  • A Lost Gem

    • Cecilia V. Hanes
    • 10/19/07

    This movie represents the best of its genre and features a great cast. Clark Gable, Deborah Kerr, and Sydney Greenstreet project well the reality of the advertising world with a light touch.

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