skip navigation
Crack-Up

Crack-Up(1946)

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

DVDs from TCM Shop

Crack-Up An art critic risks his... MORE > $14.95 Regularly $17.99 Buy Now

USER REVIEWS

user reviews

See Detailed Ratings
    Acting of Lead Performers
    Acting of Supporting Cast
    Director
    Music Score
    Title Sequence
  • No Ratings Available Add Yours Now
    Screenplay
    Cinematography
    Historical Importance
    Would You Recommend?
  • 0 Member Ratings

Add your ratings! Each of the detailed ratings you select will result in a cumulative score for this film.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

You can also write a review by clicking here. Your review will then be posted for everyone to read.

    Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
    Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
    Rate the Director
    Rating of the Music Score
    Rating of the Title Sequence
    Screenplay
    Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
    Importance in Cinema history
    Would you recommend for fans of this genre
Submit Ratings Cancel Write a Review Read Reviews

*By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use. TCM will use your personal information consistent with our Privacy Policy

NO REVIEWS AVAILABLE

The title has not been reviewed. Be the first to write a review by clicking here to start.

  • The Nightmare of WWII and Modern Art

    • Mark B. Pohlad
    • 9/13/17

    In no other American film noir does art and the museum play such an important role. The main character is an art expert, and significant themes include Old Master paintings, forgeries, and even the use of x-ray technology. In "Crack-Up" the institutional art worldmuseums, curators, and collectors-are all integral to the plot. This film is also notable for representing a museum professional as a tough, noir male lead. His name is, fittingly, "Steele" (Pat O'Brien). O'Brien's soft-spoken intensity and mature demeanor are perfect here. Similarly, the museum is shown as a foreboding and noir-ish place, an unusual treatment. In one scene in "Crack-Up," the shadow of an ancient figural sculpture looms like a spider over the guilty museum director. The most telling scene for art in America at this time occurs early on, when Steele is shown lecturing in the museum's galleries. He shows a hugely popular nineteenth-century painting of two peasants pausing from their fieldwork to pray. The audience makes reverential noises, but gasps in horror when he pulls back the cloth over a contemporary Surrealist painting. Steele calls it "nonsense" and equates modern painters with forgers. In the 1940s Americans were still bewildered by European (foreign) modernist painting.The train crash can be seen as a metaphor for the war itself. Perhaps it too was a false nightmare concocted by the rich and powerful. Steele's detailed attempt to recreate what happened on the trainin essence a "forgery"-- parallels what he'd later do in the museum's conservation lab-high tech for that time--to distinguish the real masterpiece from the fake one.Steele's sleuthing recalls what the actual WWII "Monuments Men" were doing only two years before in Europe. But now the art villains are in America, and they're dealers, wealthy collectors, and museum officials. Overall, this film dramatizes debates about modern art while confronting the ultimate noir experience: WWII.

  • crack up

    • kevin sellers
    • 1/30/15

    An interesting attempt to combine the world of noir with that of art forgery doesn't really come together. Big problem is the screenplay's decision to have the main character, an art forgery expert, find out too soon (at about the halfway point in the film) that he's not really insane, but has instead been drugged. Therefore, the second half of the movie is a not very clever unraveling of the mystery of who drugged him and why. Give it a C. P.S. Even for 1946 making jokes about Nagasaki shows why a great many people in the world do not particularly care for Americans.

  • Great Pat O'B movie

    • playedthisafternoon
    • 1/29/15

    Worth waiting to see,as I didn't see previous showing.

  • On TCM During Nite

    • ontonight
    • 11/26/14

    Waitingfor tonight

  • Great Caper-Amnesia Film

    • Ollie
    • 12/1/07

    O'Brien wakes up confused from a train crash, not certain it happened or didn't, or why he's even confused. What happened? Was there an art-theft he witnessed? Did he stumble onto a forgery ring that would kill to keep making fortunes? Great little thriller about a once-unbelievably inane subject, but was quite engaging.

  • Your Name
  • Your Email (optional)
  • Your Location (optional)
      Rate the acting of the Lead Performers
      Rate the acting of the Supporting Cast
      Rate the Director
      Rating of the Music Score
      Rating of the Title Sequence
      Screenplay
      Creatively uses the camera to tell the story
      Importance in Cinema history
      Would you recommend for fans of this genre

  • Title of your Review
  • Your Review

    Character Limit! You have reached the 2,000 word character limit for this review.

  • Preview & Submit Cancel Submit Review Go Back
Thank You!

We have received your ratings and calculated them into the overall user ratings for this title.

Click the button below to read reviews and see your posting:

Close Detailed Ratings (optional)

*We protect your personal infortmation and will not provide it to anyone without your consent. For a complete explanation, please refer to TCM's Privacy Policy. By submitting your contribution, you agree to TCM's Terms of Use.