skip navigation
Peg O' My Heart

Peg O' My Heart(1933)

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:
Remind Me

TCMDb Archive MaterialsView all archives (0)

Shop tcm.com

Peg O' My Heart - NOT AVAILABLE

Crying Boy

VOTE FOR THIS TITLE:
Our records indicate this title is not available on Home Video. Vote below for it to be released on DVD.

  1. Total votes: vote now!
  2. Rank: (why vote?)

NOTES

powered by AFI

A September 1931 Hollywood Reporter news item announced that Sarah Y. Mason was working on the screenplay and dialogue for this film. Another September 1931 Hollywood Reporter news item announced that M-G-M was "bidding" for the writing services of Philip Barry and John Balderston. It is not known if any of these writers actually contributed to the final script. According to modern sources, William Randolph Hearst, the financial backer of the Cosmopolitan unit at M-G-M, chose Peg O' My Heart as a vehicle for Marion Davies because he felt her previous "talkie" roles had been too coarse and unflattering. In a November 1932 Hollywood Reporter news item, George Marion, Sr. was announced for the role of "Pat O'Connell," which was eventually portrayed by J. Farrell MacDonald. Modern sources provide the following statistics regarding the picture: the film was 8,140 feet long, was in production for 42 days, cost $623,000 to make, and earned a total revenue of $979,000, resulting in $18,000 in profits. In addition, modern sources list John W. Considine, Jr. as the supervising producer on the film, and note that the song "Sweetheart Darlin'" became the number one hit song in the United States. J. Hartley Manner's play was first produced in 1919 by Famous Players-Lasky Corp. Because of legal disputes with Manner, the 1919 film, which was directed by William C. de Mille and starred Olga Printzlau, apparently was not released theatrically (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1911-20; F1.3402). In 1922, Metro produced another silent version of the play, which starred Laurette Taylor, the original stage "Peg," and was directed by King Vidor (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.4193).