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Kid Galahad

Kid Galahad(1937)

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  • Too sugary!

    • RedRain
    • 12/12/14

    For me, the best film ever made about corruption in boxing is Humphrey Bogart's last film "The Harder They Fall." It's the true story of the boxer Primo Carnera and it is horrifying. "Kid Galahad" is just too sugary for my money. The good guy wins the good girl, the bad girl doesn't get the good guy, and the bad guy doesn't become a decent guy until the very end when he dies. It's formulaic. Bette Davis is in this film because she was making her bones in Hollywood at the time and it wasn't until years later when she refused to act in movies such as this one. It's is past the time when anyone should look at boxing as a "lofty" sport. It is corrupt, cruel and inhumane and it hasn't been a true pugilistic sport in over 100 years and it isn't so even in the Olympics! It is rife with evil men making their money on the backs of poor men and there isn't one thing gratifying about that!

  • A movie for our time

    • mik gladihad
    • 12/13/11

    It was very refreshing and revealing to watch this movie. There were parts of me that seemed to respond specifically to the galiant, reserved, and dynamic potential of the bellhop turned prize fighter. I can imagine that a serf turned knight may be similar to a modern day engineer turned national hero.In fact I have noticed that there were many movies and tunes that have seemed to transcend time through the reuse or revisiting of lofty themes, hopes, callings, and desires. The kind of archetypes that truly are needed during these times.

  • Above average

    • Jarrod McDonald
    • 12/5/09

    It's Robinson's movie. He's great as a double-crossing manager. Bogart is also good and went on to remake it five years later, playing the Robinson role under a different title. Davis is above average...not at her best. I didn't buy her as a nightclub singer...her voice was obviously dubbed, and she doesn't radiate that type of sexuality. I think Ann Sheridan would've been better. In fact, this film could've been truly spectacular if Sheridan played the singer, Jimmy Cagney played the boxer; and Robinson remained as the manager. Also, the film is a bit slow when it ventures into melodrama. But it's still very entertaining and worth the time.

  • Original vs. Remake

    • Bruce Reber
    • 12/1/09

    I can't remember the last time I saw the original "Kid Galahad" (1937) with Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson and Bette Davis, but there was a 1962 musical remake starring Elvis Presley with the same title, which I have seen a couple of times. I'm going to watch the original when it airs again on TCM, to see if it's as good as, or better than, the '62 version with Elvis.

  • Bette Davis Wins a Best Actress Volpi Cup Again

    • BeauB
    • 7/19/09

    Director Michael Curtiz has the gift of a royal cast to work with. Edward G. Robinson plays Nick Donati, a night club owner. Bette Davis plays his mistress, called Fluff, Louise Phillips. Humphrey Bogart plays a boxing promoter Turkey Morgan. The lot centers around two themes: boxing and romantic entanglements. Robinson is perfectly cast as Donati who's presumed to have mob connections, at the very least. Bogie starts coming on strong as a character actor as Morgan, a hood, thug, and just the type of character Bogie started out his acting career being good at. However, it's Bette Davis who's the glue that holds the film together. She's in between all of the men with the ability to manager to survive them all, manage the group and care about the feelings of the other women characters. For a mob movie, in a man's world, Davis puts on a first class act.

  • 1937 Best Actress Volpi Cup for Davis

    • Jakweline
    • 6/5/09

    In 1937 Bette Davis won the Best Actress Volpi Cup Award at the Venice Film Festival for "Kid Galahad," for her portrayal of Louise 'Fluff' Phillips, Edgar G. Robinson's mistress. Michael Curtiz directs this gangster-boxing themed film, with Humphrey Bogart playing a major role in the film. With Curtiz, Davis, Bogart and Robinson headlining this film, it doesn't go wrong. In fact, it's an unsung wonderful gangster flim that should be considered a classic of the genre.

  • Kid Galahad (1937)

    • Jay
    • 5/31/09

    With Michael Curtiz at the helm, and with stars Bette Davis, Edward G. Robinson and Humphrey Bogart, it can't help but be a terrific film, and that it is. Good story, great pace. Exciting and very well done. A wonderful classic.

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