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One, Two, Three

One, Two, Three(1961)

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  • Another Great Movie Ruined by a Confusing Title.

    • oogie
    • 8/13/12

    Cagney carries this screw-ball comedy. This should be considered his last movie. Most of the jokes are dated, but that only enhances the urgency in the plot. When Southern Belle Tiffin angrily demands "Africa for the Africans", there is a brief pause, a gap in the dialogue to allow for the audience to laugh. Other contemporaneous references might be lost on some viewers. Wilder and Cagney keep up such an intense pace that a first time viewer of this movie could easily be overwhelmed. That just makes for a good reason to watch this movie more than once. A must see for fans of screw-ball. The final shot is priceless. Schlemmer!!!

  • one two three

    • j e unrein
    • 9/29/11

    what r the names of the two song played in the russian night in the movie 123

  • One, Two, Three

    • Susan Stiles
    • 10/26/10

    This is a gem of a movie that I had to watch more than once. It is hilarious. Cagney gives a brillliant fast talking performance with smart quips, funny dialogue, and fast paced action. I especially loved the way the Berlin workers would stand and click their heels when Cagney appeared due to German protocall despite his many requests to stop doing it. Also the underaged oversexed Southern Scarlett who turns up pregnant in Cagney's care. What a masterpiece. I am surprised that this film has not received as much recognition as Some Like it Hot. It needs to be watched more than once to appreciate the comedic subtleties in Cagney's speedy dialogue.

  • One Hundred Twenty Three Reasons to Drink It Down

    • Jarrod McDonald
    • 10/25/10

    This film is all about performance. He had a nearly impossible task with all this dialogue, having to deliver it so quickly and not miss any of the comic possibilities. Great script, super performance and very memorable scenes...don't you just love the boxes flying out of the speeding car on the way to the airport while the man hangs out the window painting the door?!

  • 1-2-3: A James Cagney 'gotta see'.

    • Gerry
    • 10/25/10

    Excellent, funny and fast-paced! If you're a James Cagney fan as I am, you'll find much to like about this classic comedy. Writer and director squeezed in several comical lines referencing older Cagney flicks. And, although set in the reality of cold-war/post WWII era, the issues are as relevant today as they were back in 1961: climbing the corporate ladder, importance of family as support, all-out marketing by corporations -- that crosses political, social, and economic lines in order to expand one's market share. Not to mention the Coke vs. Pepsi debate that continues to rage between friends & family; I loved the final scene and plan to watch it again on TCM!

  • Never Miss It!

    • Craig
    • 6/22/10

    I first saw this movie as a kid late night in the days when we only had four channels, rabbit ears and no color TV. It was entertaining then and it still is all these years later.Of course Cagney is the picture and he was wonderful in it. The dialog, the frenetic pace, the Billy Wilder touch...how could anyone not like this funny farce?

  • corn is delicious

    • stephen maher
    • 10/1/09

    The only negative comment for this film that I can understand is "over the top".The political and social wit is very sharp for the time.Considering that pop culture has been in the toilet since at least 1990, calling something "corny" should be praise.There are people in their 20's today who think the "Simpsons" is corny.

  • I THOUGHT IT WOULD SUCK, BUT I WAS WRONG

    • martyr
    • 8/3/08

    What a delightful surprize! I was not looking forward to watching this film. The bits I had seen previously seemed silly and confusing. And I feared a cringe-inducing over the top performance from Cagney. I found nothing of the sort. Cagney is pitch perfect and hilarious in his final role before his 20 year hiatus. There is a lesson here: never doubt Billy Wilder. And you can always count on Cagney. It is the subtle touches that make this film a truly enriching experience. From a quick Cagney impression from Red Buttons to Cagney uttering the classic Edward G. Robinson "Mother of Mercy" line, there are hidden treasures throughout. Don't skip this one!

  • Three, Two, One

    • theresa
    • 5/1/08

    Blast off! Hang on to your hat! Cagney talks faster in this one than he and Pat O'Brien combined in any of their movies. It was on purpose, of course. It's for Cagneyites who love him in anything, no matter his age (count me in)... No bullets, no slaps, a couple fun references to past Cagney pictures, and a happy ending.

  • Funny

    • D Johnson
    • 2/20/08

    For anyone who has lived in Europe this is funny. It was meant to be a silly comedy and it was. It's not "Gone with the wind" but it was "Bringing up baby". To the people that commented badly I say lighten up and watch something else. I rode in the copies of the 37 Nash. I worked in the office of efficiency and functionality. I also now live in the South and work now in Georgia. Yes it was corny but so are most of the older films. It pokes fun at everyone regardless of where you're from.

  • wacky collision

    • sunshine
    • 2/20/08

    I just stumbled across this, and since I am relearning German, I just had to watch. Yeah, its corny and wacky, but I found it funny and exaggerated. Maybe some don't like that. I thought I was imagining Cagney, but see it is him. Liked the themes of clash of cultures and ideology, and marriage. Did Coke get any money out of this???

  • A 'Sparkling' US by East European Treasure

    • Solar Jet Pro
    • 2/20/08

    I thought this movie was very much a movie to be remembered. Manic, historically relevant, odd, genuinely funny, and a stroke of cross-marketing genius, it's great to know that even back in 1961 there was an audience for and interest in making strange, little films that could. The real world view of post WWII East and West Germany are particularly relevant and of interest.

  • I can't change the channel.

    • Belle
    • 2/20/08

    I love it! It's so corny, but I can't stop watching it. Cagney is awesome.

  • One, Two Three

    • craig
    • 2/20/08

    Cagney was the only saving grace in this movie. just seeing him was a treat!! Movie was BAD!

  • Bad day at Cagney rock.

    • Bill Young
    • 1/30/08

    I am in the process of watching the final scenes from this 'movie.' I can't believe Cagney read this script and agreed to do the male lead. In my humble opinion, this is the worst movie Cagney was ever involved with. It's listed as a comedy, which only left off the words that should have been there: "...of errors.' The plot is contrived; the rest of the cast is weak at best; and there is not one redeeming factor which applies to what can best be classifed as : Not even a good 'B' movie.

  • Fun to Watch

    • David Bacon
    • 1/30/08

    Unless you're familiar with the early'60's, a lot of the very topical humorin this movie might be lost upon a current viewer. This is some biting satire on the politics of that era. But even if you're not familiar with the era, it is still amazing to watch Cagney. His energy level in this movie is hard to top. Cagney wasn't in too many comedies, but he pulls it offjust like being a cowboy in "TheOklahoma Kid." A must-see if you like Cagney.

  • One , Two < Three

    • Craig Brewster
    • 12/19/07

    Cagney carries this comedy. He was a Dean of his profession. Supporting cast was great also.

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