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Lonelyhearts

Lonelyhearts(1958)

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NOTES

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The film's working title was Miss Lonelyhearts. The closing credits differed slightly in order from the opening credits. The film marked the first independent production for Dore Schary after his departure as the head of production at M-G-M. A June 1958 Hollywood Reporter news item notes that Vera Miles was being considered for a role in the film. A press release indicated that Lee Zimmer was cast as "Jerry", but the role was played by Jack Black and Zimmer's appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. A Hollywood Reporter news item adds Curt Conway to the cast, but his appearance in the released picture has not been confirmed. In the scene in which "Adam" searches for "Justy" at a drive-in, the film playing is United Artists' 1957 release Paths of Glory (see below). Maureen Stapleton, who, as noted in the opening credits made her motion picture debut in Lonelyhearts, received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress role as "Fay Doyle."
       In 1933, UA released a 20th Century production, Advice to the Lovelorn, starring Lee Tracy and Sally Blane, and directed by Alfred Werker, which purportedly was based on Nathanael West's then controversial novel, but retained only West's title and the storyline of a reporter forced to write an advice column for the lovelorn (for more information on that film, please consult the entry in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40). In 1983, the PBS television series American Playhouse broadcast a production based on West's book, entitled Miss Lonelyhearts. That version was produced by H. Jay Holman Productions, in association with the American Film Institute, and was directed by Michael Dinner and starred Eric Roberts.