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Annie Hall

Annie Hall(1977)

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teaser Annie Hall (1977)

Synoposis

Alvy Singer (Woody Allen) is a neurotic comedy writer who falls madly in love with Annie Hall (Diane Keaton), an aspiring singer. Despite a few obstacles in their burgeoning romance, Alvy and Annie move in together, but Alvy becomes so neurotic about their affair that he begins to cramp Annie's style. A major change in their relationship occurs when Annie is spotted performing a song in a Manhattan club by record tycoon Tony Lacey (Paul Simon), who persuades her to move to Los Angeles. This new development puts an added strain on their relationship since Alvy loathes the West Coast.

Producer: Charles H. Joffe, Jack Rollins
Director: Woody Allen
Screenplay: Woody Allen, Marshall Brickman
Cinematography: Gordon Willis
Costume Design: Ralph Lauren, Nancy McArdle, Ruth Morley
Film Editing: Ralph Rosenblum
Original Music: Gus Kahn
Principal Cast: Woody Allen (Alvy Singer), Diane Keaton (Annie Hall), Tony Roberts (Rob), Carol Kane (Allison), Paul Simon (Tony Lacey).C-94m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.


Why Annie Hall is Essential

The 1977 Best Picture Oscar® winner continued a number of themes that Allen had approached in previous films such as Bananas (1971), Sleeper (1973) and Love and Death (1975), wry explorations of romantic angst buoyed by his emphasis on the comic pitfalls that crop up on the path to happiness. In Annie Hall it was not the content that had changed, as much as the form. Allen's earlier films bounce like a pinball between silent-movie slapstick, the Marx Brothers' absurdism and modern self-referentiality as they pay homage to, poke fun at and playfully explore such diverse subjects as television news, old movies, Russian literature, science fiction, religion and, of course, sexual frustration. Annie Hall marks the point at which Allen reined in the unchecked impulses of these delightfully chaotic comedies and began to aim his directorial gaze with greater focus and clarity.

The change, however, was not a simple one. Originally, Annie Hall was a light-hearted murder mystery, then a comedy set in Victorian England (Allen later returned to these impulses with Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) and Shadows and Fog, 1992). Allen and co-screenwriter Marshall Brickman then transformed their ideas into a reckless comedy of romantic errors entitled Anhedonia. Defined as a form of melancholia under which a person is incapable of enjoying happiness, no matter what the circumstances, Anhedonia was a free-association romp through the perpetually frustrated mind of Alvy Singer (Allen). An early cut of the film ran more than three hours and was no doubt comparable to the episodic comedies that Allen had previously directed.

But when Allen decided to structure the film around Alvy's relationship with Annie (Diane Keaton), the film suddenly cohered into something more than a comedy and more than a romance. Inspired by Allen's own romance with Keaton (whose real name is Hall), Annie Hall charts the rise and fall of Singer's relationship with the titular character, punctuated with bits of unrestrained comedy, celebrity cameos (Marshall McLuhan, Dick Cavett, Paul Simon, etc) and moments of poignant truth. It was a bittersweet blend that was to become Allen's trademark, even as he has tried to escape it with such introspective dramas as Interior (1978), Another Woman (1988) and September (1987).

Other filmmakers have filled the void with thinly-veiled clones of Allen's distinctive comedies (such as Rob Reiner's When Harry Met Sally (1989) and Billy Crystal's Forget Paris, 1995), but Annie Hall stands as a romantic-comedy original upon which there can be no improvement. It was also the first comedy since Tom Jones (1963) to win the Best Picture Oscar, and still holds that honor. It is even rarer still that such a witty comedy could win top honors by ridiculing the Hollywood community, for Allen pulls no punches in skewering the West Coast mentality.

by Scott McGee and Bret Wood

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teaser Annie Hall (1977)

Pop Culture 101 - ANNIE HALL

Perhaps the most immediate impact that Annie Hall had on American pop culture was on women's fashion. The female public was completely taken with the "Annie Hall look" that Diane Keaton sported in the movie: floppy hats, oversized men's shirts, vests, baggy chinos and ties, all sporting a hip "unkempt" look. Not since Marlene Dietrich sported a man's tuxedo had men's clothing looked so fashionable on women in the movies.

Who is Marshall McLuhan, the man being discussed by the obnoxious movie patron? McLuhan was an influential writer and critic who proposed many radical and offbeat theories about the media's role and influence in contemporary society. After he filmed his short scene in Annie Hall, McLuhan suffered a stroke in 1976, and continued to battle health problems until his death in 1980. Even several years after his death, McLuhan is still thought to be either a genius or a fool among worldwide intellectuals and scholars. Wired magazine named McLuhan its "patron saint" when the high-tech periodical was founded in 1993.

Woody Allen obviously took a cue from one of his favorite comedians - Groucho Marx - for numerous scenes in this film. Throughout Annie Hall, Allen makes constant asides that only the viewer can see and hear. This gimmick not only sets this romantic comedy above others, it also references Groucho's use of the gag in Animal Crackers (1930). Groucho, in turn, was spoofing the stage play, Strange Interlude, which used dramatic asides, but not for comic effect.

Another Brechtian device that Woody Allen employs in Annie Hall is to allow Alvy to observe the events from his past as they are played out in front of him. This is a nod to one of Allen's favorite filmmakers, Ingmar Bergman, who used a similar structure, though in a much more dramatic vein, for Wild Strawberries (1957).

Take a gander at the many future stars who appeared in small or bit parts in Annie Hall: Jeff Goldblum as a party guest, Sigourney Weaver as Alvy's date outside a theater, Christopher Walken as Annie's off-kilter brother Duane, John Glover as one of Annie's first boyfriends, and Beverly D'Angelo as an actress on a TV show.

Near the beginning of the film, Woody Allen inserts an in-joke on Diane Keaton's behalf. When Alvy is harassed by two rough, autograph-seeking men, he chides Annie for leaving him alone with "the cast of The Godfather (1972)," a film in which Keaton starred opposite Al Pacino as Michael Corleone's wife, Kay.

In an August 22, 1993 article in the New York Times, Maureen Dowd reported that Woody Allen had "long toyed with the idea of picking up the Annie Hall characters to see where they are now. 'I've saved some footage from the original, so I could show them young and old...And Diane and I are both alive and working.'"

by Scott McGee

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teaser Annie Hall (1977)

ANNIE HALL - Trivia and Other Fun Stuff

While he was making Annie Hall, Woody Allen became a fixture in the funny papers. In 1976, Inside Woody Allen, drawn by Stuart Hample and based on Woody's comedy material, premiered in 180 newspapers in sixty countries. The strip ran for eight years.

We swear we're not making this up, but Diane Keaton was born with the surname Hall. She later changed it by adopting her mother's maiden name in order to avoid confusion with another actress named Diane Hall.

Everyone knows that Keaton made quite an impression on women's clothing with her Annie Hall wardrobe. But not many know that Keaton also made an impression on Broadway when, as a cast member in Hair, she refused to remove her clothing for the final 'au naturel' number.

When Alvy runs into Annie in New York after their final break-up, the meeting takes place at a theater showing The Sorrow and the Pity (1971). The landmark, four-hour documentary from director Marcel Ophuls happens to be Woody Allen's favorite film.

Walter Matthau was one of the co-presenters of Diane Keaton's Best Actress Academy Award® on Oscar® night on March 29, 1978. Matthau made his final film appearance in Hanging Up (2000), directed by and co-starring Diane Keaton.

In the first draft of Annie Hall, Alvy and Annie played amateur sleuths investigating the supposed suicide of one of Alvy's college philosophy professors named Dr. Levy, only to learn later that he was actually murdered. While Dr. Levy was eliminated from the final script, along with the mystery aspects of the story altogether, Dr. Levy did show up in Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), only this time it was an actual suicide. The "Nick and Nora" plot, a la The Thin Man movies, was eventually abandoned as well, but Allen adapted the murder mystery scenario for his reunion with Diane Keaton in Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993).

When Woody Allen won the Director's Guild Award, everyone wondered if the homegrown New Yorker would leave the Big Apple long enough to travel to Los Angeles to claim an Oscar®. Allen, who refused to allow his name to appear in United Artists' Oscar® advertisements for Annie Hall, said that he'd be at his usual place on Oscar night - playing clarinet with the New Orleans Marching and Funeral Band at Michael's Pub on Manhattan's East Side. "I couldn't let down the guys," Allen said. Indeed, Allen didn't let the guys down, and he concluded the evening by reading himself to sleep with the book Conversations with Carl Jung. Allen awoke the next morning to learn from the New York Times that Annie Hall won big at the Academy Award® ceremonies. Allen later said of his film's sweep, "I was very surprised. I felt good for Diane because she wanted to win. My friend Marshall and my producers Jack Rollins and Charles Joffe had a very nice time. But I'm anhedonic."

A year later, Woody had a bit more to say on the subject of the Academy Awards®. "I know it sounds horrible," he said, "but winning that Oscar® for Annie Hall didn't mean anything to me. I have no regard for that kind of ceremony. I just don't think they know what they're doing. When you see who wins those things - or doesn't win them - you can see how meaningless this Oscar thing is."

Famous Quotes from ANNIE HALL:

Alvy Singer: I really wanted to be an anarchist, but I didn't know where to register.

Alvy Singer (to Annie): Where did you grow up, in a Norman Rockwell painting?

Alvy Singer: You're always trying to get things to come out perfectly in art because it's real different in life.

Alvy Singer: They give awards for everything. For the World's Biggest Fascist - Adolf Hitler!

Alvy Singer: Whose Catcher in the Rye is this? You know, you wrote your name in all my books because you knew this day was gonna come.Annie Hall: Now look, all the books on death and dying are yours and all the poetry books are mine. You only gave me books with the word "death" in the title.

Alvy Singer: I was thrown out of NYU my freshman year for cheating on my metaphysics final, you know. I looked into the soul of the boy sitting next to me.

Pam (to Alvy): Sex with you is a Kafkaesque experience. I mean that as a compliment.

Alvy Singer: Right, well I have to go now, Duane, because I'm due back on planet Earth.

Alvy Singer (to Annie after sex): That was the most fun I've had without laughing.

Alvy Singer: I heard that "Commentary" and "Dissent" had merged and formed "Dysentery."

Alvy Singer: Yeah, grass, right? The illusion that it will make a white woman more like Billie Holiday.

Alvy Singer: That's essentially how I feel about life. Full of loneliness and misery and suffering and unhappiness, and it's all over much too quickly.

Alvy Singer: Love is too weak a word for what I feel. I lurve you. I luff you.

Alvy Singer: Popular? Nixon was popular. Hula-hoops were popular. An epidemic of typhus is popular. Quantity doesn't imply quality.

Alvy Singer: You know, even as a kid, I always went for the wrong woman. I think that's my problem. When my mother took me to see Snow White, everybody fell in love with Snow White. I immediately fell for the Wicked Queen.

Alvy Singer: A relationship, I think, is-is like a shark. You know, it has to constantly move forward or it dies, and I think what we got on our hands is a dead shark.

Alvy Singer: It's all mental masturbation.
Annie Hall: Oh, well, now we're finally getting to a subject you know something about.
Alvy Singer: Hey, don't knock masturbation. It's sex with someone I love.

Alvy Singer (mocking Los Angeles culture): They don't throw their garbage away. They make it into television shows.

Compiled by Scott McGee

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teaser Annie Hall (1977)

The Big Idea Behind ANNIE HALL

Annie Hall did not start off as a comedy about contemporary relationships. It was originally conceived as a murder mystery, with Annie Hall and Alvy Singer as the two main characters, amateur detectives who believe that an apparent suicide was actually a homicide victim. The story then evolved into a period farce that took place in Victorian England. And Annie Hall might very well have become a murder mystery, had Woody Allen not questioned the undertaking with co-writer Marshall Brickman, asking, "Do we really want to write this? Do we want to go to Boston to shoot this and work on costumes and deal with all those problems? Let's do a contemporary story." (Woody eventually did tackle a period mystery with Shadows and Fog (1992), his comic homage to German Expressionist cinema.)

So after abandoning the murder angle - this concept was later developed and produced as Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) - Allen and Brickman wrote a story about what went on inside the mind of Alvy Singer, a chronically insecure comedy writer. There was also a subplot concerning Alvy's romantic problems. After test screenings though, it became obvious that audiences preferred the focus of the film to be on Alvy's relationship with Annie and not the writer's professional career. The Alvy-Annie relationship was also particularly intriguing because it was inspired by Woody Allen's past romance with Diane Keaton (they were now just good friends) and incorporated some personal experiences from both partners into the storyline.

by Scott McGee

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teaser Annie Hall (1977)

Behind the Camera on ANNIE HALL

Annie Hall is a semi-autobiographical story about Diane Keaton and Woody Allen's own romantic relationship. At the time of the film's release, Allen revealed that he and Keaton had not been lovers for at least four years (They stopped living together in March 1970 when Keaton got her own apartment on East 68th Street). Their professional relationship started in earlier co-starring roles in Play it Again, Sam (1972), Sleeper (1973), Love and Death (1975), and has continued in Interiors (1978), Radio Days (1987), and Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993).

When Allen and Keaton first worked together on the stage play Play it Again, Sam in 1969, they had problems keeping a straight face while in character on-stage. They encountered the same problem while shooting Annie Hall. An example of the uncontrollable laughter between the two was the lobster dinner scene. It was the first scene shot for the movie and neither Woody nor Diane had to do much acting for the scene, for their laughter was completely spontaneous.

Woody Allen and co-writer Marshall Brickman came up with the majority of the Annie Hall screenplay by walking up and down the streets of New York City, specifically between Lexington and Madison Avenues. Annie Hall almost arrived on the screen under a different title, Anhedonia, a word that refers to the psychological condition when one is unable to experience joy, no matter how pleasant one's circumstances. Just a few weeks prior to the film's release was writer/director Allen persuaded to change the title. But up until the release, the press and exhibitors could not even get a working title out of the writer/director. They only knew the new Woody Allen film as the "new Woody Allen Film," the working title of most of Allen's projects since then. After Annie Hall premiered at Filmex, the annual film festival held in Los Angeles, Allen made himself more accessible to the press and theater chains and revealed the final title of his film. He also discussed the genesis of the project, saying, "I wanted it to be about...real people, real problems besetting some fairly neurotic characters trying to exist in male-female relationships in America in 1977. So it turns out to be more serious than anything I've ever tried before."

The budget for Annie Hall was $3 million when production began and slowly swelled to $4 million. The shooting schedule began at Long Island's South Fork and was kept secret from the media. Soon, Allen and his crew were filming all over New York City - Coney Island, the Upper West Side, St. Bernard's School in West Village (for Alvy's elementary school scenes), the Statler Hilton Hotel (the Adlai Stevenson rally sequence), Grand Finale on West 70th Street (the nightclub where Annie sings her songs), and the South Street Seaport Museum by the East River. There were also several scenes featuring popular New York cinemas such as the Thalia, the Beekman, The New Yorker, and the Paris. The beach scenes were shot at Amagansett, Long Island and Englewood, New Jersey was used as a stand-in for Chippewa Falls.

The first cut of Annie Hall ran 2 hours and 20 minutes and took almost six weeks to assemble, although Allen had shot enough footage to make three movies! Editor Ralph Rosenblum and his assistant Susan E. Morse were assigned the task of condensing 100,000 feet of footage to a 93-minute running time. But their first cut was severely disappointing to Allen and Brickman who quickly saw the strengths and weaknesses of their concept magnified. In fact, Brickman considered the first twenty-five minutes "a disaster." But Allen quickly stepped in to restructure and whittle down numerous sequences: The opening monologue was reduced to six minutes, sections dealing with Alvy's first and second wives (Carol Kane and Janet Margolin) were reduced to brief flashbacks, and the tennis club sequence toward the beginning of the film was placed 24 minutes into the film. Some scenes were completely eliminated like a French Resistance fantasy, a spoof on Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), an elaborate sports fantasy involving the Knickerbockers' and shot on location at Madison Square Garden, and a surreal takeoff on the 1946 film, Angel on My Shoulder.

For a sequence set at Coney Island, Allen once kept a crew of 200 extras hanging around for an entire morning and never found the inspiration to shoot that day.

According to author Julian Fox in his biography, Woody: Movies From Manhattan, "There were difficulties with the famous scene where Marshall McLuhan in the New Yorker lobby 'annihilates' the bore who is waiting in line to see The Sorrow and the Pity. Woody had tried to persuade several different celebrities to fill the McLuhan spot, his first choice having been Fellini. This was logical 'casting,' as it linked up with a previous dialogue but, said Woody, Fellini was unwilling to come to the United States for just this one sequence. In the event, McLuhan was not very convincing, even playing himself, and the scene was later reshot. At which point, Woody, according to one observer, 'didn't want to talk to him any more. It was very embarrassing.'"

The ending of Annie Hall also proved to be highly problematic for Allen. He wanted to end the film with the jailhouse scene where he is desperate to be reunited with Annie in Hollywood. Rosenblum urged him to reconsider and Allen eventually shot new footage for the final segment. In his biography, Woody: Movies From Manhattan, Julian Fox wrote "One sequence, where Alvy and Annie meet awkwardly outside the Thalia, again showing The Sorrow and the Pity, was, said Rosenblum, 'a real downer,' and was eventually confined to a single long shot, reducing Sigourney Weaver's cameo as Alvy's date to an imperceptible walk-on...Another sequence, shot on the last day of filming, had Alvy in Times Square wondering what to do about Annie, when he looks up at a flashing sign which reads, 'What are you doing, Alvy? Go to California. It's OK. She loves you.' Viewing the scene in dailies, Woody hated it so much he went to the nearest reservoir and threw the reels in. It was Rosenblum, prompted by Woody's chance remark on the denouement of the original murder script, who finally suggested ending the film on a continuation of Alvy's opening monologue - with a brief series of flashbacks to the Annie affair, accompanied by Alvy's final voice-over."

by Scott McGee & Jeff Stafford

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teaser Annie Hall (1977)

The Critics' Corner on ANNIE HALL

Critics fell all over themselves praising Annie Hall when it opened theatrically. The Los Angeles Herald-Examiner hailed it as Woody Allen's "wittiest, best film to date, both more socially and personally observant in its departure into the foibles and traumas of a human relationship." In Saturday Review, Judith Crist called it "Allen's most satisfying creation and our most gratifying comedic experience in recent years." In Time, Richard Schickel opined that it is "a ruefully romantic comedy that is at least as poignant as it is funny and may be the most autobiographical film ever made by a major comic."

In Newsweek, Janet Maslin saw the film as "bracingly adventuresome and unexpectedly successful, with laughs as satisfying as those in any of Allen's other movies and a whole new staying power."

Even Stanley Kauffmann, no Woody Allen fan, wrote in The New Republic that "the cheery news (is) he has written his best film script and he is now a competent director." Curmudgeonly critic Pauline Kael called it "the neurotic's version of Abie's Irish Rose."

M.J. Sobran, Jr. at the National Review dismissed the film when he wrote, "What it finally comes to is ninety minutes of coitus interruptus, fun but fruitless. Annie Hall may look like a comedy or a romance, but it's really a tsuris trap." The New York Daily News warned that "Annie Hall will likely be a trifle disconcerting for audiences who've been reduced to tears of laughter by Woody Allen; his new comedy is so tinged with sadness it tends to encourage actual weeping."

Critic John Simon went in the negative direction when he complained that the film is "everything we never wanted to know about Woody's sex life and were afraid he'd tell us anyway."

"Annie Hall" contains more intellectual wit and cultural references than any other movie ever to win the Oscar%reg; for best picture, and in winning the award in 1977 it edged out "Star Wars," an outcome unthinkable today....This is a movie that establishes its tone by constantly switching between tones: The switches reflect the restless mind of the filmmaker, turning away from the apparent subject of a scene to find the angle that reveals the joke. "Annie Hall" is a movie about a man who is always looking for the loopholes in perfection. Who can turn everything into a joke, and wishes he couldn't." - Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times/I>.

"It's safe to say that every Woody Allen film has a cult following. But only Annie Hall is loved - loved is the correct word - by every Allen fan, as well as those obstinate moviegoers who still won't concede Allen is a great filmmaker....I think it is the film that generates the most warmth among Allen fans, for it was the pivotal film of his career...Annie Hall marked Allen's transition from a functional and slapdash, though instinctively funny, filmmaker to one who is technically innovative, thematically sophisticated, intent on capturing the beauty of the women and the city (New York) he loves, eager to explore his characters, and passionate about using this storytelling medium to its fullest." - Danny Peary, Cult Movies 3.

AWARDS & HONORS:

With the release of Annie Hall, Woody Allen became the first person since Orson Welles in 1941 to be nominated for Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Screenplay Oscars®. The film won Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Screenplay, and Best Director.

Other Annie Hall honors include winning four British Academy Awards including Best Film, Best Direction, Best Screenplay, and Best Actress (Keaton). The film also won the 1978 Directors Guild Award, the Golden Globe Best Actress in a Musical/Comedy award (Keaton), the 1977 Los Angeles Film Critics Association award for Best Screenplay, four New York Film Critics Circle awards including Best Picture and Best Director, and the 1992 National Film Registry award.

by Scott McGee & Jeff Stafford

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teaser Annie Hall (1977)

Widely recognized as the film which marked Woody Allen's transition from irreverent funny man to "serious" screen artist, Annie Hall (1977) represents more than a shift from comedy to drama.

The 1977 Best Picture-winner continued a number of themes that Allen had approached in previous films such as Bananas (1971), Sleeper (1973) and Love and Death (1975), wry explorations of romantic angst buoyed by his emphasis on the comic pitfalls that crop up on the path to happiness. In Annie Hall it was not the content that had changed, as much as the form. Allen's earlier films bounce like a pinball between silent-movie slapstick, the Marx Brothers' absurdism and modern self-referentiality as they pay homage to, poke fun at and playfully explore such diverse subjects as television news, old movies, Russian literature, science fiction, religion and, of course, sexual frustration. Annie Hall marks the point at which Allen reined in the unchecked impulses of these delightfully chaotic comedies and began to aim his directorial gaze with greater focus and clarity.

The change, however, was not a simple one. Originally, Annie Hall was a light-hearted murder mystery, then a comedy set in Victorian England (Allen later returned to these impulses with Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) and Shadows and Fog, 1992). Allen and co-screenwriter Marshall Brickman then transformed their ideas into a reckless comedy of romantic errors entitled Anhedonia. Defined as a form of melancholia under which a person is incapable of enjoying happiness, no matter what the circumstances, Anhedonia was a free-association romp through the perpetually frustrated mind of Alvy Singer (Allen). An early cut of the film ran more than three hours and was no doubt comparable tothe episodic comedies that Allen had previously directed.

But when Allen decided to structure the film around Alvy's relationship with Annie (Diane Keaton), the film suddenly cohered into something more than a comedy and more than a romance. Inspired by Allen's own romance with Keaton (whose real name is Hall), Annie Hall charts the rise and fall of Singer's relationship with the titular character, punctuated with bits of unrestrained comedy, celebrity cameos (Marshall McLuhan, Dick Cavett, Paul Simon, etc) and moments of poignant truth. It was a bittersweet blend that was to become Allen's trademark, even as he has tried to escape it with such introspective dramas as Interiors (1978), Another Woman (1988) and September (1987).

The ending of Annie Hall proved to be highly problematic for Allen. He wanted to end the film with the jailhouse scene where he is desperate to be reunited with Annie in Hollywood. Rosenblum urged him to reconsider and Allen eventually shot new footage for the final segment. In his biography, Woody: Movies From Manhattan, Julian Fox wrote "One sequence, where Alvy and Annie meet awkwardly outside the Thalia, again showing The Sorrow and the Pity, was, said Rosenblum, 'a real downer,' and was eventually confined to a single long shot, reducing Sigourney Weaver's cameo as Alvy's date to an imperceptible walk-on...Another sequence, shot on the last day of filming, had Alvy in Times Square wondering what to do about Annie, when he looks up at a flashing sign which reads, 'What are you doing, Alvy? Go to California. It's OK. She loves you.' Viewing the scene in dailies, Woody hated it so much he went to the nearest reservoir and threw the reels in. It was Rosenblum, prompted by Woody's chance remark on the denouement of the original murder script, who finally suggested ending the film on a continuation of Alvy's opening monologue - with a brief series of flashbacks to the Annie affair, accompanied by Alvy's final voice-over."

In addition to winning the Best Picture Oscar of 1977, Annie Hall also won Academy Awards for Best Actress (Diane Keaton), Best Director, Best Original Screenplay. Woody Allen was also nominated for Best Actor but lost to Richard Dreyfuss for The Goodbye Girl. Other filmmakers have since filled the void with thinly-veiled clones of Allen's distinctive comedies (such as Rob Reiner's When Harry Met Sally (1989) and Billy Crystal's Forget Paris, 1995), but Annie Hall stands as a romantic-comedy original upon which there can be no improvement.

Producer: Charles H. Joffe
Director: Woody Allen
Screenplay: Woody Allen
Cinematography: Gordon Willis
Costume Design: Ralph Lauren; Nancy McArdle; Ruth Morley
Film Editing: Ralph Rosenblum
Original Music: Gus Kahn
Principal Cast: Woody Allen (Alvy Singer), Diane Keaton (Annie Hall), Tony Roberts (Rob), Carol Kane (Allison), Paul Simon (Tony Lacey), Janet Margolin (Robin), Colleen Dewhurst (mom Hall), Christopher Walken (Duane Hall), Shelley Duvall (Pam), Helen Ludlam (Grammy Hall), Mordecai Lawner (Alvy's Dad), Joan Neuman (Alvy's Mom).
C-94m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Bret Wood

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