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The Prince and the Showgirl

The Prince and the Showgirl(1957)

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  • A fascinating artifact...

    • Denise Bassen
    • 5/22/14

    So much has been said about the lack of chemistry between Monroe and Olivier, especially at the time of it's release, that it is easy to overlook the artistic successes of this film. It is also easy to overlook Monroe's performance because of the expectations that are projected onto her. There is subtlety in her performance as an American show girl, who is quite literate and insightful. I especially appreciated the scene during the coronation, when Monroe's character grasps that she has stumbled into a scene of magnificent art, music, and great historic significance. Olivier was the director, so I can only assume that the chemistry (or to some, lack of it) was his decision. In the past, I passed this film up because of the indifferent reviews, but now find myself seeing it several times while it is available on TCM. Apart from the beauty of the production, it should be remembered that this film has a script based on a successful play.

  • come off it!

    • jose garcia
    • 1/26/14

    Marilyn Monroe, even today is total eye candy.....how can you blast this costumed epic, with great matte work, choreographed balls, characterizations, albeit lame, of European aristocracy......but Marilyn Monroe is in it! A more perfect image of the doll, the glamour goddess, the face, look, et al.....no the movie itself may be one excuse for stereo-typical Hollywood treatment of the jaded European, but with Marilyn, throwing herself at a Father figure, as she was doing in real life with Joltin Joe Dimaggio, is in almost every scene. To this viewer anyhow, it is the perfect "man cave" film.................I give it 4 1/2 Enchiladas on a 5 enchilada edible scale.

  • The Prince and the Show Girl

    • Anna Scott
    • 1/26/14

    Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier were not even listed in the initial credits!! Good thing I perused the description wanting to know more or I would have missed this film completely!!!

  • Destroyed?

    • DougieB
    • 11/23/12

    No film should be destroyed. Is this movie the greatest? No. Does it have, from top to bottom, some of the best actors, both leading and supporting, working in England at that time? Yes. The film has a script, based on his own play, by Terrence Rattigan, one of the most respected "modern"British playwrights. To suggest the destruction of a film that isn't to your personal taste shows a lack of respect for the art form in general, in my opinion.

  • worst ever

    • glenn s
    • 8/4/12

    this movie is the worst in all catagorieslarry olivier is horriblly miscast an d marilyn was equally as badthis film should be destroyed

  • The Prince and the Showgirl (1957)

    • Mr. Blandings
    • 12/12/11

    Horrible performances, and mismatched leads have no chemistry. This movie made me want to run screaming from the room it was so natteringly annoying and chaotically dialogued. Unwatchable, so I stopped watching halfway through. You'd have to be a die-hard Monroe fan to watch this, and I don't think any Olivier fan would put up with it. *

  • A step down from Bus Stop, but not a drastic one.

    • DougieB
    • 3/25/09

    'Frothy", I think, is what they used to call this kind of movie. It would have made more sense between The Seven Year Itch and Bus Stop, but after Bus Stop, Marilyn had transcended this kind of formulaic role and image. (No, I do NOT have a good explanation for Let's Make Love, other than the fact that she had contract obligations.) Still, there's the "prestige" of working with Olivier. If he'd been as aware of the unique kind of prestige she offered him in turn, maybe this would have worked better. Here, the greatest actor working in the English language looks like a stiff, and Marilyn totally shines. Apparently, Dame Sybil Thorndike was the only one who realized Marilyn was blowing them all off the screen, and yet she had nothing but good things to say. Supposedly, Olivier did a lot of venting about Marilyn to anyone who would listen, and if he'd applied some of that energy to his scenes with her, he wouldn't have come off looking so bad. Be warned, this movie is VERY British, but witty as well. If you're a fan of Marilyn, you must see this.

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