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'Til We Meet Again

'Til We Meet Again(1940)

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Crying Boy

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  • Oh Leonard!

    • Bob Eckert
    • 5/16/14

    With a single word Leonard Maltin can turn so many off to a film that he often refuses to evaluate as if it is not a remake on it's own merits. The word "Overblown" begins his review and this film does not deserve such a dismissing adjective. I often observe that when Leonard gives a film a low rating, the average of all viewers is more often than not, higher. This is why Leonard will never rise to the level of a reviewer like the late Roger Ebert, who is, in his time, the gold standard for reviews that can actually be used as a touchstone for movie lovers.

  • Merle Oberon

    • Mike
    • 10/20/13

    Enough said! Combined with George Brent - a fine example of Hollywood Cheese. Love it.

  • GREAT !

    • paul
    • 10/18/13

    I LOVED THIS MOVIE ALSO SEEN ONE WAY PASSAGE TOO BUT GEORGE BRENT WAS GREAT ACTOR SEEN ALL HIS FILMS

  • I prefer this one

    • Asa Quon
    • 1/2/13

    I prefer this version over the 1932 One Way Passage. Both have excellent casts, but this one excels in its more believable script. One Way Passage relied much more on suspension of disbelief for the various relationships and encounters among the characters. The ending is also much more to my liking. I've heard the various Lux Radio Theater and Screen Guild Radio plays of the story (there are 3 or 4 of them), each with its unique ending.

  • Here We Go Again . . . .

    • D. Dyer
    • 7/30/06

    In case no one noticed, this is not an original plot, but then in Hollywood, especially today, what' new!This film is a remake of the 1932 tear-jerker, "One Way Passage". Starring William Powell as "Dan", and Kay Francis as "Joan", the script and plot are virtual carbon copies. George Brent is 'smooth' as Dan, headed for the end of the line at San Quinten Prison, and Miss Oberon is an appealing "Joan", but the first one (Powell/Francis) was better. Where Brent is 'smooth', Powell is 'urbane'. Miss Francis had that very expressive face and sense of drama that made her the superior Joan. Still, as a 'chick-flic', the still manage to grab you, even if it's unwillingly!

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