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Waterloo Bridge

Waterloo Bridge(1931)

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  • Mae Clarke

    • Brian
    • 8/27/15

    I was familiar with the 1940 version only and considered it a fair film...this pre-code production is far better and now I think Mae Clarke, whom I barely knew, was one of the greatest artists Hollywood ever put on celluloid!

  • Excellent

    • afelps
    • 6/5/12

    All I can say is Mae Clarke! Mae Clarke! Mae Clarke! She is utterly captivating. Not often enough do I feel such an emotional response to a performance. The menagerie of emotions that she expresses in this film tugged at myheart. Her feelings of shame at resorting to prostitution in order to survive and her anger at herself after she takes Roy's money and he thanks her for taking it. She had me leaning closer to the screen with each scene.

  • Waterloo Bridge,A Classic For All Time

    • Betty
    • 6/22/11

    I am so happy TCM played this movie. I've been wanting to see it since seeing the remake, and will watch Gaby next time it's on. All actors were great, esp Mae and Bette, what little she had to do. Kent Douglass (Montgomery) was aweet in the role, maybe naive, but very kind, esp when finding out about Myra's true profession. Mae Clarke really deserved a better career, as did Mr Montgomery. James Whale did an excellent job, but Hollywood should have done better for him. He was no one time director, no matter his lifestyle, but that was then, and the public needed their heroes. Unfortunately, some were far worse than those made an example of.

  • Excellent Movie

    • Patriot55
    • 6/20/11

    I was impressed with the emotional kick of this movie and even more so on reading about the restrictions placed on the Director (Whale) by the studio ( tight budget and a 26 day shooting schedule). I understand he still brought it in under budget and even shut down shooting for 3 days to help his young male lead (Kent Douglass) improve his part/acting. But what really fascinated me was reading that the movie was based on an actual event. Apparently the author (who wrote it as a play that flopped on Broadway), based it on his meeting an American chorus girl turned prostitute in 1918 during an air raid in London. To often you find yourself noticing the technical flaws in early "talkies" made at the time of this film. But this wasn't the case with this movie. I also agree with the other reviewers about the good work by Mae Clarke, very believable acting there. The other 2 versions don't hold up well against this movie, though I would have preferred the ending of the third version (Gaby). Hey, I'm a sucker for a happy ending.

  • Waterloo Bridge (1931)

    • steveturk1
    • 7/20/10

    It`s been many years since I`ve seen this film but I remember being bowled over by it! Mae Clarke proved that she could be much more than the gangster`s moll who gets a grapefruit smashed in her face. Thanks to James Whale`s direction, this version is far more creative than the later version with Vivian Leigh. Of course, the fact that it was made before the Hays code was enforced had a lot to do with that! Why TCM seems to ignore this version for the later one, I`ll never know. Maybe because many of the newer converts to TCM are more familiar with Vivien Leigh?

  • Please Show This Film, TCM

    • Antonias
    • 5/21/09

    By far superior to Vivian Leigh's sudsy 1940's version, Mae Clark, as the lead in this early scripted film, is superb. Don't miss Bette Davis as Janet, the sister of Clark's love interest. Clark's the shady lady par excellance. This was one such film that was an interesting starting point for the celebrated acting career of Bette Davis. Whale's direction makes such a distinguished difference in this version. The remake doesn't compare.

  • Should Be Broadcast It's So Good

    • ZZane
    • 5/7/09

    Although Bette Davis is only in a supporting role in this wonderful film, the plot is too rich to simply ignore the film's value. Even though the war is the border around a romance that double-crosses social status barriers, until the film's end the war is not the featured aspect of the film. The forbidden romance due to unequal class statuses is. Davis plays the sister of the man of a wealthy family who's fallen for a dance hall woman.

  • Forbidden Hollywood

    • Bill2008
    • 8/9/08

    i have watched waterloo bridge several times and i think it is a very good and unique film. actually, all 3 films in this forbidden hollywood collection are excellent.

  • Very Good Movie

    • D. Lewis
    • 3/2/08

    THIS IS A VERY GOOD MOVIE WITH GREAT ACTING AND DIRECTION. I THINK THIS VERSION IS BETTER THAN THE VERSION WITH VIVIEN LEE AND ROBERT TAYLOR. I ACTUALLY SAW THE LATER VERSION FIRST SEVERAL YEARS AGO AND THOUGHT IT WAS A REAL GOOD FILM. BUT, NOW THAT I HAVE SEEN THIS VERSION, I THINK THE 1931 VERSION IS SUPERIOR. THIS FILM WITH MAE CLARK DESRVES TO BE ON TCM MORE OFTEN. I WILL PROBABLY BUY THE DVD.

  • Timeless Classic

    • william ashley
    • 2/3/08

    This film is an underated timeless classic. Mae Clarke (Myra) is a great and beautiful actress who for some reason never attained the fame of Bette Davis or Barbara Stanwych. The acting in this film is excellent and very fresh. The scenes in Myra's apartment are especially outstanding. The director does not waste a moment.

  • what a surprise!

    • michael york
    • 12/6/06

    mae clarke and kent douglass give such outstanding performances!! it is kind of sad that they never again got such an opportunity one can see the work whale put into the movie more real and less soapy than the 1940 movie which survives alone on the v. leigh performance this version is truly affecting

  • 1931 WATERLOO BRIDGE

    • JOHN C. CASTIELLO
    • 8/9/06

    DOES TCM HAVE THE RIGHTS TO TELECAST THIS EARLY TALKIE. I HAD HEARD FROM ON LINE THAT IT WILL BE RELEASED THIS YEAR ON DVD.THANK YOU.

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