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Women in the Wind

Women in the Wind(1939)

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  • Off we go...!

    • Jim Coyne
    • 1/13/14

    I agree with the enthusiasm for the historical significance of this film. I was at the Y, on a treadmill, and went as always to TNT -- where better to escape the boredom of Fox News and aching muscles? I tuned in late, as usual, but was captivated by the sight of the period airplanes and the surprisingly effective aerial photography. Also the presence of a very young Eve Arden. Story line a bit limp, but the performers did their professional best. SAVE for the airplanes!

  • Air Race history

    • Michael McCloud
    • 1/3/11

    There is great value in this film. First, even though the plot is a bit transparent with no real surprises, it is an enjoyable story, fitting for the time. The real worth, however, is in the history of the early air races and the exquisite planes depicted. The form and function of these planes are mostly lost to history except to those who research the air races of those days; the very 'down and dirty' methods of getting the race finished no matter the cost, the exorbitant expense in the planes, and the determination of the women pilots in competition in what was a largely unexplored sport in that day is nothing short of inspiring.It would be a great service to the classic movie audience and to air race history enthusiasts if this film would be shown more frequently. As the movie is shown so rarely, it has not had enough exposure to the public so as to receive more enthusiasm from the viewing public. I would purchase multiple copies of the film as gifts, if available.

  • Thanks Cris

    • Jarrod McDonald
    • 12/2/09

    I really enjoyed reading your post! I just saw this film the other day...the aerial sequences are very good. I thought Kay Francis was believable as the aviatrix. I didn't know about these other women flyers you mentioned...now I will research it more. There's another film about women flyers called 'Christopher Strong' starring Kate Hepburn from a few years earlier but it takes place in England I think.

  • Great Air Race film

    • Cris
    • 10/22/09

    Although the plot is hokey, the depiction of the women flyers in this film is accurate and much better than the film Tail Spin. I work at the International Women's Air & Space Museum, and I have seen a photo of Amelia Earhart, Ruth Chatterton (air race pilot and actress)and Kay Francis. I wondered why Miss Francis was in the photo until I saw Women In The Wind. Her hair style in the film is adapted after 1930s air race pilot, Arlene Davis and the scene where she has to land on one wheel was an event that happened to the 1930s air race pilot, Blanche Noyes. The planes are accurate for the time period and the airport offices look like airport offices of the period.

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