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Ruby Keeler

Ruby Keeler

  • Sweetheart of the Campus (1941) September 04 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Gold Diggers Of 1933 (1933) September 05 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Footlight Parade (1933) September 05 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Mother Carey's Chickens (1938) November 12 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Shipmates Forever (1935) November 14 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died: February 28, 1993
Born: August 25, 1909 Cause of Death: cancer
Birth Place: Halifax, Nova Scotia, CA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1911:
Family moved to New York's Lower East Side when Keeler was three (date approximate)
:
Professional debut in cabaret as a buck-dancer in partnership with Patsy Kelly
1922:
Danced in Texas Guinan's El Fey speakeasy at age 13 (date approximate)
1923:
New York stage debut in chorus of "The Rise of Rosie O'Reilly"
1927:
First major Broadway stage role in "Bye, Bye Bonnie"
1928:
Appeared on Broadway in "Whoopee"
1929:
Al Jolson was instrumental in getting Keeler a featured role in Ziegfeld's "Show Girl" on Broadway; Jolson strolled down aisle of theater singing "Liza" while Keeler tap danced; he received no billing and no salary
1933:
Film debut, "42nd Street"; was also her first film collaboration with choreographer and dance director Busby Berkeley and the first of seven joint appearances opposite singer Dick Powell
1934:
Last of four consecutive musicals with musical numbers supervised by Busby Berkeley, "Dames"
1936:
Last film in which she co-starred with Dick Powell, "Colleen"
1937:
Last film at Warner Brothers, "Ready, Willing and Able"
1938:
Replaced Katharine Hepburn as one of the two female leads (the other being Anne Shirley) in "Mother Carey's Chickens", her last film for three years and her first non-musical film
1940:
Returned to stage in "Hold onto Your Hats" at the Grand Opera House, Chicago
1941:
Final film before first retirement, "Sweethearts of the Campus"
1941:
Retired from stage and film
1970:
Returned to film in "The Phynx"
1971:
Made Broadway comeback in a revival of the 1920s stage musical, "No, No Nanette"
1975:
Suffered a stroke and was operated on for an aneurysm of the brain, was comatose for two months (date approximate)
1989:
Final film, "Beverly Hills Brats"

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