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Also Known As: Quincy Delight Jones Jr. Died:
Born: March 14, 1933 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Chicago, Illinois, USA Profession: producer, musician, arranger, composer, magazine publisher, actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

One of the most significant figures in entertainment for over five decades, Quincy Jones was a musician, producer, arranger, composer and media giant whose collaborations with the biggest names in the music industry - from Frank Sinatra and Miles Davis to Michael Jackson - created some of the greatest music ever recorded. A trumpet prodigy in his teens, he cut his teeth as an arranger during the jazz scene of the 1950s. By the 1960s, he was a vice-president at Mercury Records, an acclaimed musician in own right, and the composer of such memorable film scores as "The Pawnbroker" (1964) and "In Cold Blood" (1967). Though his own work was nothing less than stellar, his records for others - in particular, Jackson with Off the Wall and Thriller - achieved iconic status, elevating him to legend. In the 1980s and 1990s, he branched into film and television production, finding success with each endeavor, as well as pursuing philanthropic interests in the new millennium. His dedication to art and entertainment, his boundless abilities and his astonishing accomplishments made him one of the most important personalities in American culture for over five decades.

One of the most significant figures in entertainment for over five decades, Quincy Jones was a musician, producer, arranger, composer and media giant whose collaborations with the biggest names in the music industry - from Frank Sinatra and Miles Davis to Michael Jackson - created some of the greatest music ever recorded. A trumpet prodigy in his teens, he cut his teeth as an arranger during the jazz scene of the 1950s. By the 1960s, he was a vice-president at Mercury Records, an acclaimed musician in own right, and the composer of such memorable film scores as "The Pawnbroker" (1964) and "In Cold Blood" (1967). Though his own work was nothing less than stellar, his records for others - in particular, Jackson with Off the Wall and Thriller - achieved iconic status, elevating him to legend. In the 1980s and 1990s, he branched into film and television production, finding success with each endeavor, as well as pursuing philanthropic interests in the new millennium. His dedication to art and entertainment, his boundless abilities and his astonishing accomplishments made him one of the most important personalities in American culture for over five decades.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

3.
 Bad 25 (2012)
4.
5.
 Celia the Queen (2008)
6.
 Rwanda Rising (2007)
8.
10.
 Fantasia 2000 (1999) Host
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1944:
Family moved from Chicago to Seattle, Washington
:
Began learning the trumpet while in grade school
1948:
Met and formed a band with Ray Charles; performed in Seattle soul clubs
1950:
Traveled to New York to arrange music for jazz bassist Oscar Pettiford
1950:
Was trumpeter and arranger with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra
1956:
Toured the Middle East and South America with Dizzy Gillespie's Big Band
1957:
Moved to Paris to study music composition and theory, taking a job with Mercury Records' French distributor to pay for his studies
1960:
First feature credit, produced the music for the Swedish production of "Pojken i trädet (The Boy in the Tree)"
1961:
Hired by Mercury Records as an A&R representative
:
Formed Quincy Jones Band and toured USA with performers like Redd Foxx, Peggy Lee and Billy Eckstine
:
Became the first black executive in a white owned record company when he was appointed to vice president at Mercury Records
1965:
Scored first US feature, "The Pawnbroker"; directed by Sidney Lumet
1966:
TV series debut, provided music for "Hey, Landlord" (NBC)
1967:
First credited as music director for a TV special, "Rodgers and Hart Today" (ABC)
1967:
TV-movie debut with the score for "Ironside" (NBC)
1968:
Garnered first Oscar nominations for Best Song ("The Eyes of Love" from "Banning") and for Best Original Music Score for "In Cold Blood"
1969:
Signed with A&M records and released first album, <i>Walking in Space</i>
1971:
Feature debut as music supervisor, "Man and Boy"
1969:
Picked up third Oscar nomination for the theme song to the 1968 film "For Love of Ivy"
1972:
Served as music director on "The New Bill Cosby Show" (CBS)
1973:
TV performance and appearance debut, "Save the Children"
1973:
TV debut as producer, also credited as music director and guest for the CBS special, "Duke Ellington ... We Love You Madly"
1977:
Won an Emmy for scoring the landmark ABC miniseries "Roots"
1978:
Adapted the music, provided songs, and served as music supervisor for "The Wiz"; directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Michael Jackson; received fourth Oscar nomination for music
1979:
Produced and arranged <i>Off The Wall</i> for pop star Michael Jackson; first of three albums with Jackson
1980:
Formed Qwest Records
1982:
Feature debut as a song performer, "The Last American Virgin"
1982:
Produced Jackson's best-selling album <i>Thriller</i>
1985:
Feature debut as executive music producer, "Fast Forward"
1985:
Feature debut as a co-producer, "The Color Purple"; also provided music and songs; received three Oscar nominations, for Best Picture, Best Original Score and Best Song ("Miss Celie's Blues (Sister)")
1985:
Served as producer and arranger on the world hunger anthem "We Are the World"
1986:
Provide the theme for "The Oprah Winfrey Show"
1987:
Produced Michael Jackson's album "Bad"
:
Series debut as executive producer, "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air"
1990:
Episodic TV debut, as himself, "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air"
1990:
Subject of the documentary, "Listen Up: The Lives of Quincy Jones"
1991:
Dramatic TV debut,"Life Goes On", in an episode titled, "Last Stand in Glen Brook"
1992:
Developed <i>Vibe</i> magazine
1993:
Was an executive producer of the presidential inauguration festivities (January)
1994:
Narrated the documentary, "A Great Day in Harlem"
1995:
Executive producer of the late night variety show "Mad TV"
:
Served as an executive producer of the sitcom "In the House" (NBC, 1995-1996; UPN, 1996-1998)
1996:
Produced Academy Awards show and telecast
:
Executive producer of the syndicated talk show "Vibe"
1999:
Sold Qwest Broadcasting group to Tribune Company
2001:
Served as executive producer of "Say It Loud!", a five-part series aired on VH-1
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Seattle University: Seattle , Washington -
Berklee College of Music: Boston , Massachusetts -
Boston Conservatory of Music and Drama: Boston , Massachusetts -

Notes

As of 2002, Jones has received 85 Grammy Award nominations.

In 1990, he was named to the French Legion of Honor. In 2001, he was was elevated to the rank of Commandeur de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government.

Recipient of the Trumpet Award in 1993.

Jones received the first Granville While Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. He was quoted in the Chicago Sun-Times (May 3, 1999): "This is a very touching award for me because this is the first time I have gotten ana awrd in my hometown [of Chicago]."

He received an honorary degree from New York University in May 1999.

"Before I leave this planet, one of my goals is to find a way to make it accessible for Americans to know their own music. They don't have a clue -- black or white! It's very, very powerful stuff. And the irony of it is how the entire world bypassed kabuki, bagpipes, whatever else -- in favor of American pop music to be their voice, their Esperanto. That's some powerful stuff." --Quincy Jones quoted in The Hollywood Reporter, October 16-22, 2001.

"The rapper may not realize how deep the roots are with the griots from West Africa, who were like oral historians, and with the imbongi, who were the praise shouters. [It's said] everytime a griot dies, another library burns to the ground." --Quincy Jones in Interview, November 1995.

"The process is the most beautiful part. You know, there are two kinds of composers: one who sees the goal across the park and just runs straight to it, and the other one who goes to the park, stops, takes a leaf and feels it, takes his shoes off, and puts his feet in the water for awhile. You're going across the park anyway, you might as well take the trip, you know." --Jones in Interview, November 1995.

"I saw the very first cassette in 1962, the first video cassette, the first laser disc. I saw all that stuff. So, I trust evolution, I trust it implicitly. I can drive us, and we drive it, but you have to understand it and make it work for you. Stravinsky said in 'Poetics of Music' that the greatest thing a creator can do is be a good observer." --Jones in Interview, November 1995.

"One day, before I die, I want to direct a film." --Quincy Jones.

"African music is not savage at all. It's the most sophisticated music on the planet. I bet that 100 years from now, Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Ellington and Charlie Parker will be the Bachs and Stravinskys of this country. The evolution of African American music is so powerful and expressive, from spirituals to rap." --Quincy Jones in USA Today, November 7, 1995.

"I have so much stuff in the warehouses. I finish a project and ask, so I spend a month cleaning up or do I keep moving? You can't afford to be one step behind. You never say, "We're there.' You never get there. You're not supposed to." --Jones in USA Today, November 7, 1995.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Jeri Caldwell. Divorced in the mid-1960s; childhood sweetheart.
wife:
Ulla Anderson. Model. Swedish; divorced in 1974.
wife:
Peggy Lipton. Actor. Third wife; married c. 1972; divorced in 1986.
companion:
Natassja Kinski. Actor. Born on January 24, 1960; mother, of Jones' sixth child; no longer together.
companion:
Mickella Tupta. Dated in 1998; no longer together.
companion:
Lisette Derouax. Dating as of 1999.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Quincy Delight Jones Sr. Carpenter.
mother:
Sarah Jones. Savings and loan owner, apartment complex manager. Born in Vicksburg, Mississippi; daughter of a sharecropper; moved to Chicago to attend college; founded Federal Savings and Loan Corporation, a black-owned bank; later managed an apartment complex on Chicago's South Side; died of a stroke at age 94 on January 22, 1999 in Seattle.
brother:
Lloyd Jones. TV engineer.
daughter:
Jolie Jones. Mother, Jeri Caldwell.
daughter:
Martina Lisa Jones. Mother, Ulla Anderson.
son:
Quincy Jones III. Born c. 1972; mother, Ulla Anderson.
daughter:
Kidada Jones. Actor, model. Born March 22, 1974 mother, Peggy Lipton; dated LL Cool J; was engaged to musician Tupac Shakur when he was killed.
daughter:
Rashida Jones. Born February 25, 1976; mother, Peggy Lipton.
daughter:
Kenya Julia Miambi Sarah Jones. Born on February 9, 1993; mother, Nastassja Kinski.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Q: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones" Doubleday

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