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Enzo Barboni

Enzo Barboni

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Like many other men of his age, Enzo Barboni served in World War II; unlike many other men of his age, he turned his work as a wartime camera operator into a successful career as a cinematographer and director. Barboni worked as a camera operator during the '40s and '50s, most notably on the Audrey Hepburn-Gregory Peck romantic comedy "Roman Holiday," and transitioned to cinematography in the '60s. He served on the crew of "Gidget Goes to Rome," which was filmed entirely on location, and worked on numerous films with his longtime collaborator, noted Italian director Sergio Corbucci. In 1970 Barboni adopted the pseudonym E.B. Clucher and directed his first two films; "The Unholy Four," about an escaped convict with no memory, and the spaghetti Western "My Name is Trinity." The latter film, about a drifter (Terence Hill) who tries to horn in on his brother Bambino's (Bud Spencer) fake sheriff scam, blended slapstick elements with a traditional Western plot and became a major critical and commercial success. Barboni, Spencer, and Hill teamed up for a sequel, "Trinity is STILL my Name!," which proved even more popular than the original and made Hill and Spencer international stars. A few years later...

Like many other men of his age, Enzo Barboni served in World War II; unlike many other men of his age, he turned his work as a wartime camera operator into a successful career as a cinematographer and director. Barboni worked as a camera operator during the '40s and '50s, most notably on the Audrey Hepburn-Gregory Peck romantic comedy "Roman Holiday," and transitioned to cinematography in the '60s. He served on the crew of "Gidget Goes to Rome," which was filmed entirely on location, and worked on numerous films with his longtime collaborator, noted Italian director Sergio Corbucci. In 1970 Barboni adopted the pseudonym E.B. Clucher and directed his first two films; "The Unholy Four," about an escaped convict with no memory, and the spaghetti Western "My Name is Trinity." The latter film, about a drifter (Terence Hill) who tries to horn in on his brother Bambino's (Bud Spencer) fake sheriff scam, blended slapstick elements with a traditional Western plot and became a major critical and commercial success. Barboni, Spencer, and Hill teamed up for a sequel, "Trinity is STILL my Name!," which proved even more popular than the original and made Hill and Spencer international stars. A few years later Barboni directed the pair in "Crime Busters," where they portrayed a bumbling criminal duo who end up on the Miami police force, and cast them as two men comically mistaken for secret agents in "Go For It."

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