skip navigation
George Jenkins

George Jenkins

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

George Jenkins - NOT AVAILABLE

Find what your looking for faster use the search field below to shop for titles.

SEARCH TCM.COM/SHOP


OR ... Click here to VOTE > for this person to be released on Home Video



Also Known As: George Clarke Jenkins Died: April 6, 2007
Born: November 19, 1908 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Baltimore, Maryland, USA Profession: production designer, set designer, lighting director, interior designer, engineer, teacher

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A versatile and prolific production designer, George Jenkins learned his craft as assistant to famed stage designer Jo Mielziner. After a brief period as an art director in Hollywood (on such films as "The Best Years of Our Lives" 1946 and "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" 1947), he spent much of the 1950s dividing his time between the Broadway stage and television. During that decade, Jenkins worked as a color specialist at both NBC and CBS as well as designed such plays and musicals as "The Desk Set" (1954), "The Happiest Millionaire" (1957) and a revival of "Annie Get Your Gun" (1958).Jenkins twice worked onstage with director Arthur Penn and writer William Gibson on "Two for the Seesaw" (1958) and "The Miracle Worker" (1959). Penn hired the designer to recreate his work on the 1962 film version of "The Miracle Worker". At that point, Jenkins' feature work accelerated and he contributed meticulous and original settings for a number of fine films. For "Wait Until Dark" (1967), he assisted in creating the contemporary Greenwich Village apartment of Audrey Hepburn's character. In contrast, "1776" (1972) required designs that implied Colonial America while "Funny Lady" (1975) featured extravagant...

A versatile and prolific production designer, George Jenkins learned his craft as assistant to famed stage designer Jo Mielziner. After a brief period as an art director in Hollywood (on such films as "The Best Years of Our Lives" 1946 and "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" 1947), he spent much of the 1950s dividing his time between the Broadway stage and television. During that decade, Jenkins worked as a color specialist at both NBC and CBS as well as designed such plays and musicals as "The Desk Set" (1954), "The Happiest Millionaire" (1957) and a revival of "Annie Get Your Gun" (1958).

Jenkins twice worked onstage with director Arthur Penn and writer William Gibson on "Two for the Seesaw" (1958) and "The Miracle Worker" (1959). Penn hired the designer to recreate his work on the 1962 film version of "The Miracle Worker". At that point, Jenkins' feature work accelerated and he contributed meticulous and original settings for a number of fine films. For "Wait Until Dark" (1967), he assisted in creating the contemporary Greenwich Village apartment of Audrey Hepburn's character. In contrast, "1776" (1972) required designs that implied Colonial America while "Funny Lady" (1975) featured extravagant Broadway-style musical numbers. Jenkins enjoyed a long and successful screen collaboration with director Alan J Pakula dating from "Klute" (1971). He shared an Oscar for his recreation of the newsrooms of THE WASHINGTON POST and other capitol settings in "All the President's Men" (1976). Perhaps his most challenging work for Pakula came with "Sophie's Choice" (1982) which required a recreation of 1950s Brooklyn as well as Nazi concentration camps. Jenkins final screen work included the courtroom settings for Pakula's "Presumed Innocent" (1990).

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1934:
Worked as an interior and industrial designer
:
Served as assistant to famed scenic designer Jo Mielziner
:
Was plant engineer at Simmons Aerocessories Co.
1943:
Broadway debut as set and lighting designer, "Early to Bed"
1946:
Feature debut, credited for art direction, "The Best Years of Our Lives"
1949:
Last feature work for over a decade, art direction on "Roseanna McCoy"
:
Worked for both NBC and CBS as a color director and color specialist during the 1950's
:
Designed sets for the CBS variety program "New Revue"
1957:
Received first Tony nominations for "The Happiest Millionaire" and "Too Late the Philarope"
1959:
Designed the stage production "The Miracle Worker"; earned a Tony nomination
1962:
Returned to features as art director for Arthur Penn's "The Miracle Worker"
1965:
Worked again with Penn on "Mickey One"
1971:
First collaboration with director Alan J Pakula, "Klute"
1975:
Was production desinger on the film musical "Funny Lady"
1976:
Final Broadway production, "Sly Fox"
1976:
Shared Oscar for Best Art Direction/Set Decoration for Pakula's "All the President's Men"
1979:
Shared Oscar nomination for production design on "The China Syndrome"
1984:
TV-movie debut, "The Dollmaker"
:
Taught motion picture design at UCLA
1990:
Last film credit and final collaboration with Pakula, "Presumed Innocent"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania - 1929 - 1931

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Phyllis Adams. Second wife; married on May 6, 1955.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Benjamin Wheeler Jenkins. Merchant.
mother:
Jane Jenkins.
daughter:
Jane Jenkins Dumaise. Mother, Jenkins' first wife.
step-daughter:
Alexandra Kirkland Marsh. Deceased.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute