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Maurice Jarre

Maurice Jarre

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Also Known As: Maurice Alexis Jarre Died: March 29, 2009
Born: September 13, 1924 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: France Profession: composer, conductor, musical director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

One of the most prolific film composers of the late 20th Century, Lyon-born Maurice Jarre had been crafting film underscores for a decade when he came to international prominence in 1962 with his Oscar-winning score for the sweeping David Lean-directed epic "Lawrence of Arabia."Jarre studied percussion and composition at the Paris Conservatory under Arthur Honneger, Jacques de la Presle and Louis Aubert. Following military service in the French navy during WWII, he was tapped by Jean Louis Barrault to serve as orchestral composer and arranger for Barrault's theater company. When he left Barrault after four years, Jarre joined with Jean Vilar's recently formed Theatre National Populaire and honed his craft preparing incidental music for classical works by Moliere, Victor Hugo and Shakespeare. Shortly thereafter, the composer crossed over into films, debuting with the music for George Franju's short "Hotel des Invalides" (1952) and following up over the next six years with the scores for several shorts and documentaries, including "Toute la memoire du monde" (1956), directed by Alain Resnais, and "Le Bel Indifferent" (1957), helmed by Jacques Demy. Franju tapped the musician for the full-length feature...

One of the most prolific film composers of the late 20th Century, Lyon-born Maurice Jarre had been crafting film underscores for a decade when he came to international prominence in 1962 with his Oscar-winning score for the sweeping David Lean-directed epic "Lawrence of Arabia."

Jarre studied percussion and composition at the Paris Conservatory under Arthur Honneger, Jacques de la Presle and Louis Aubert. Following military service in the French navy during WWII, he was tapped by Jean Louis Barrault to serve as orchestral composer and arranger for Barrault's theater company. When he left Barrault after four years, Jarre joined with Jean Vilar's recently formed Theatre National Populaire and honed his craft preparing incidental music for classical works by Moliere, Victor Hugo and Shakespeare. Shortly thereafter, the composer crossed over into films, debuting with the music for George Franju's short "Hotel des Invalides" (1952) and following up over the next six years with the scores for several shorts and documentaries, including "Toute la memoire du monde" (1956), directed by Alain Resnais, and "Le Bel Indifferent" (1957), helmed by Jacques Demy. Franju tapped the musician for the full-length feature "La Tete contre les murs/The Keepers" (1958) and Jarre's career began to take off in earnest. He wrote the rare horror score for "Eyes Without a Face/Les Yeux sans visages" (1959) and collaborated with Richard Fleischer on "Crack in the Mirror" (1960) and "The Big Gamble" (1961).

But it was his association with Lean that yielded Jarre's best-known work. Following the award-winning "Lawrence of Arabia," the two once again worked together on "Doctor Zhivago" (1965), which brought Jarre his second Academy Award and included the haunting, seemingly ubiquitous "Lara's Theme." After a five year absence, the duo reunited to collaborate on the uneven "Ryan's Daughter" (1970) and then enjoyed one last pairing with "A Passage to India" (1984), which earned Jarre his third Oscar.

In addition to his work with Lean, Jarre also has enjoyed successful teamings with John Huston (including the stirring music for 1975's "The Man Who Would Be King") and Peter Weir (five features to date, including the all electronic scores for 1982's "The Year of Living Dangerously" and 1985's "Witness"). As of 2000, he has amassed a career total of nine Academy Award nominations (eight for original score and one for Best Song for "Marmalade, Molasses and Honey" from 1972's "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean"). Among the numerous TV projects that have borne his creative stamp are the acclaimed miniseries "Jesus of Nazareth" (NBC, 1977), "Shogun" (NBC, 1980) and the small screen remake of "Samson and Delilah" (ABC, 1984).

In addition to his illustrious career as a film composer, Jarre has also written the scores for several ballets, symphonic pieces and other classical works. Additionally, he has appeared as conductor of some of the world's most renowned orchestras. After more than fifty years as a musician and composer, Jarre obviously has not lost his touch: filmgoers in 2000 were treated to two of his lilting scores in the films "Sunshine" and "I Dreamed of Africa."

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Lean By Jarre (1993)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1946:
Served as a musician with Radiodiffusion Francaise
:
Became the Théâtre National Populaire director
1952:
Made motion picture debut as a composer with the short film "Hotel des Invalides"
1958:
First full-length feature score, "The Keepers/La Tete contre les murs"
1959:
Penned the score for the horror film, "Eyes Without a Face"
1962:
First collaboration with director David Lean, "Lawrence of Arabia"; received first Academy Award
1962:
Composed the dramatic underscore for "The Longest Day"
1963:
Picked up second Oscar nomination for the music for "Sundays and Cybele"
1965:
Second collaboration with Lean, "Doctor Zhivago"; produced the haunting "Lara's Theme"
1966:
Wrote the music for the race film, "Grand Prix"
1968:
Scored the Isadora Duncan biopic, "Isadora" starring Vanessa Redgrave in the title role
1969:
Collaborated with Alfred Hitchcock to provide the underscore for "Topaz"
1970:
Third film with Lean, "Ryan's Daughter"
1972:
First of three collaborations with director John Huston, "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean"; received only Oscar nomination to date for the Best Original Song category for "Marmalade, Molasses and Honey"
1973:
Scored the John Huston directed, "The Mackintosh Man"
1974:
Composed the music for the NBC TV-movie, "Great Expectations"
1975:
Final film with Huston, "The Man Who Would Be King"
1976:
Wrote the score for Elia Kazan's "The Last Tycoon"
1977:
Provided the music for the NBC biblical miniseries, "Jesus of Nazareth"
1977:
Earned an Oscar nomination for scoring, "Mohammad Messenger of God"
1977:
Penned the music for the James Bond film, "The Spy Who Loved Me"
1979:
Composed the score for the award-winning, "The Tin Drum"
1980:
Wrote the underscore for the NBC miniseries, "Shogun"
1980:
Created the background music for the film, "Resurrection"
1982:
Initial film with Peter Weir, "The Year of Living Dangerously"
1984:
Returned to the small screen with the music for the ABC remake of "Samson and Delilah"
1984:
Final collaboration with Lean, "A Passage to India"
1985:
Scored "Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome"
1985:
Received an Oscar nomination for scoring Peter Weir's "Witness"
1986:
Penned the score for "Tai-Pan," based on a James Clavell novel
1986:
Hired by Weir to score "The Mosquito Coast"
1987:
Wrote the background music for the box-office hits "No Way Out" and "Fatal Attraction"
1988:
Crafted the score for the NBC miniseries, "The Murder of Mary Phagan"
1988:
Received an Oscar nomination for scoring "Gorillas in the Mist"
1989:
Again collaborated with Weir on "Dead Poets Society"
1990:
Earned ninth career Academy Award nomination for the score for "Ghost"
1992:
Penned the music for "School Ties"
1993:
Re-teamed with Weir for "Fearless"
1993:
Headlined the PBS special tribute to David Lean, "Lean by Jarre"
1994:
Received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
1995:
Garnered praise for his musical compositions for "A Walk in the Clouds"
1999:
Composed the score for the historical drama, "Sunshine" (released in the US in 2000)
2000:
Wrote the music for "I Dreamed of Africa"
2001:
Final film, Jon Avnet's holocaust drama, "Uprising"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Lyon: -
Sorbonne: -
Conservatoire de Paris: -

Notes

Over the years, Jarre has conducted numerous renowned orchestras ranging from the London Philharmonic Orchestra to the Osaka Symphonic Orchestra to the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

". . . when I worked with Fred Zinnemann on "Behold a Pale Horse" (1964), he wanted a smaller sound, almost chamber music. William Wyler wanted a medium-sized score for "The Collector" (1965). On the other hand, for "Topaz" (1969) Alfred Hitchcock wanted a big score. So it's not a question of Hollywood. You work for the film, not the studio." --Maurice Jarre quoted in The Hollywood Reporter Deauville Film Festival Special Edition, August 31-September 6, 1999.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
France Pejot. Married in 1946; divorced.
wife:
Dany Saval. Actor. Married in January 1965; divorced.
wife:
Laura Devon. Married in December 1967; divorced.
wife:
Khong Fui Fong. Married in December 1984.
VIEW COMPLETE COMPANION LISTING

Family close complete family listing

father:
Andre Jarre. Technical director of local radio station.
son:
Jean-Michel Jarre. Composer. Mother, France Pejot.
daughter:
Stephanie Jarre. Mother, Dany Saval.

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