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Bryan Ferry

Bryan Ferry

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: September 26, 1945 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Washington, England, GB Profession:

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Best-known as the suave lead singer of cult favorites Roxy Music, Bryan Ferry also carved out a successful solo career which flitted between the elegant art-rock of the group's final records and cover versions of various soul, pop and jazz standards. Born in Washington in the North East of England in 1945, Ferry studied fine art at the University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne under the tutelage of pop conceptualist Richard Hamilton and briefly worked as a pottery teacher while cutting his musical teeth fronting local bands The Banshees, The City Blues and The Gas Board.In 1970 he joined forces with the latter's Graham Simpson, amongst others, to form Roxy Music, a glamorous avant-garde outfit who quickly established themselves as one of the U.K.'s most innovative rock bands. In the same year that Brian Eno's departure installed Ferry as the undisputed leader of the group, he also launched his first solo venture with 1973's These Foolish Things, a typically stylish set of songs originally recorded by the likes of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Beach Boys, a formula he also stuck with on 1974's Another Time, Another Place.Following Roxy Music's disbanding in 1976, Ferry continued to cement his...

Best-known as the suave lead singer of cult favorites Roxy Music, Bryan Ferry also carved out a successful solo career which flitted between the elegant art-rock of the group's final records and cover versions of various soul, pop and jazz standards. Born in Washington in the North East of England in 1945, Ferry studied fine art at the University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne under the tutelage of pop conceptualist Richard Hamilton and briefly worked as a pottery teacher while cutting his musical teeth fronting local bands The Banshees, The City Blues and The Gas Board.

In 1970 he joined forces with the latter's Graham Simpson, amongst others, to form Roxy Music, a glamorous avant-garde outfit who quickly established themselves as one of the U.K.'s most innovative rock bands. In the same year that Brian Eno's departure installed Ferry as the undisputed leader of the group, he also launched his first solo venture with 1973's These Foolish Things, a typically stylish set of songs originally recorded by the likes of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Beach Boys, a formula he also stuck with on 1974's Another Time, Another Place.

Following Roxy Music's disbanding in 1976, Ferry continued to cement his reputation as pop's most debonair frontman on Let's Stick Together, a collection of covers, B-sides and reworkings, and his first album of original material, 1977's In Your Mind. Inspired by his break-up with supermodel Jerry Hall, 1978's The Bride Stripped Bare turned out to be his last solo effort for seven years as he returned to the Roxy Music fold for a reunion which spawned their only U.K. number one, a rendition of John Lennon's "Jealous Guy," and their best-known album in the United States, the elegant classic Avalon (1982), which spawned hits with the title track and "More Than This," a song later revived by Bill Murray in a poignant scene in the comedy-drama "Lost In Translation" (2003).

Ferry resumed his solo career in style in 1985, topping the U.K. album charts with Boys and Girls, performing at the London leg of Live Aid with Pink Floyd's David Gilmour and contributing to the soundtrack of Ridley Scott's fantasy-adventure "Legend" (1985). In 1987, he teamed up with The Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr on his sixth studio effort, Bete Noire, and achieved his first and only U.S. Top 40 hit with "Kiss and Tell" before starting work on Mamouna, a record featuring several of his former bandmates which only saw the light of day six years later in 1994.

After a five-year break from the spotlight, Ferry returned in 1999 with the Grammy-nominated batch of jazz standards As Time Goes By, and once again reunited with Roxy Music for a lengthy tour before releasing 2002's Frantic and making his film debut in the short "The Porter." Following 2007's tribute album Dylanesque and 2010's Olympia, a return-to-form which featured collaborations with a whole host of younger artists including Scissor Sisters, Groove Armada and Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood, Ferry was awarded the CBE by The Queen for his services to the British music industry. While in 2012 he assembled The Bryan Ferry Orchestra to record big band covers album In The Jazz Age, as well as several pieces for Baz Luhrmann's adaptation of "The Great Gatsby" (2013).

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CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Breakfast on Pluto (2005) Cast
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Milestones close milestones

1970:
Forms Roxy Music
1973:
Releases first solo album, <i>These Foolish Things</i>
1985:
Tops UK album chart with <i>Boys and Girls</i>
2001:
Picks up first Grammy nomination for <i>As Time Goes By</i>
2011:
Receives CBE from The Queen
:
Known for such albums as "As Time Goes By" and "Boys And Girls"
:
Popular songs include "Slave To Love" and "Kiss & Tell".
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