skip navigation
Ice Cube

Ice Cube

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

Barbershop: The Next Cut ... It's been more than 10 years since our last appointment at Calvin's Barbershop.... more info $9.95was $28.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: O'Shea Jackson, O'Shea Jackson (Ice Cube) Died:
Born: June 15, 1969 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California, USA Profession: rapper, actor, songwriter, screenwriter, director, producer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

As a solo artist and as a member of the influential West Coast group N.W.A., Ice Cube was a driving force that helped put gangsta rap on the map. He stood out from his peers as a great - if controversial -storyteller with a tremendous presence onstage. It was only a matter of time before filmmakers recognized his potential. Much as Ice Cube made his mark representing the tough streets of South Los Angeles in his music, his early film appearances likewise cast him as familiar characters from the 'hood. He showed great screen promise with his debut in John Singleton's Academy Award-nominated "Boyz 'n the Hood" (1991) and built up an acting resume with a string of thugs before taking the helm as a screenwriter and producer of the successful "Friday" film franchise, including "Friday," (1995) "Next Friday" (2000) and "Friday After Next" (2002). From that more lighthearted take on urban life, Ice Cube stretched his range with an acclaimed performance in David O. Russell's war film "Three Kings" (1999). Despite the unruly image of his continued musical output, Ice Cube was able carve out a different onscreen persona, breaking through to the mainstream with the hugely successful "Barber Shop" (2002)...

As a solo artist and as a member of the influential West Coast group N.W.A., Ice Cube was a driving force that helped put gangsta rap on the map. He stood out from his peers as a great - if controversial -storyteller with a tremendous presence onstage. It was only a matter of time before filmmakers recognized his potential. Much as Ice Cube made his mark representing the tough streets of South Los Angeles in his music, his early film appearances likewise cast him as familiar characters from the 'hood. He showed great screen promise with his debut in John Singleton's Academy Award-nominated "Boyz 'n the Hood" (1991) and built up an acting resume with a string of thugs before taking the helm as a screenwriter and producer of the successful "Friday" film franchise, including "Friday," (1995) "Next Friday" (2000) and "Friday After Next" (2002). From that more lighthearted take on urban life, Ice Cube stretched his range with an acclaimed performance in David O. Russell's war film "Three Kings" (1999). Despite the unruly image of his continued musical output, Ice Cube was able carve out a different onscreen persona, breaking through to the mainstream with the hugely successful "Barber Shop" (2002) franchise and family films "Are We There Yet?" (2005) and "The Longshots" (2008), earning the respect of fans and critics alike, proving this former rapper had the versatility to take on any part Hollywood asked of him.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Players Club, The (1998) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Fist Fight (2017)
2.
 Ride Along 2 (2016)
3.
 Barbershop 3 (2016)
4.
5.
 22 Jump Street (2014)
6.
 Ride Along (2014)
7.
 21 Jump Street (2012)
9.
 Lottery Ticket (2010)
10.
 Janky Promoters (2009)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1983:
Began writing rap lyrics at age 14
1989:
Left N.W.A. over business disputes; the group continued for two unsuccessful years
1992:
Acted with fellow rapper Ice-T in Walter Hill's "Trespass"
1994:
Reunited with former N.W.A member Dr. Dre, who was now part of Death Row Records, in duet "Natural Born Killaz"
1995:
Played Teddy Woods in "The Glass Shield"
1995:
Reteamed with Singleton for college drama "Higher Learning"
1997:
Co-starred in horror film "Anaconda"
1997:
Portrayed a South African searching for his missing brother in "Dangerous Ground"; also served as executive producer
1999:
Featured in the independent "Thicker Than Water"
2000:
Starred in the sequel "Next Friday"; also produced and wrote
2001:
Acted in the sci-fi thriller "John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars"
2002:
Co-starred in "All About the Benjamins" and "Friday After Next"; both of which he also wrote and produced
2002:
Featured in the ensemble comedy "Barbershop"
2003:
Co-starred in the motorcycle feature "Torque"
2004:
Reprised the role of Calvin for "Barbershop 2"
2005:
Played an ex-criminal who joined the National Security Agency in "XXX: State of the Union"
2005:
Teamed with filmmaker RJ Cutler to create the six-part FX documentary series titled "Black. White."
2007:
Starred in the comedy sequel "Are We Done Yet?"
2008:
Co-starred opposite Keke Palmer in the Fred Durst-directed sports comedy "The Longshots"
2010:
Produced and acted in the small screen adaptation of his movie "Are We There Yet?," starring Terry Crews
2010:
Co-starred opposite Bow Wow in the comedy feature "Lottery Ticket"
2012:
Cast in the crime drama "Rampart" opposite Woody Harrelson
2014:
Reprised role as Captain Dickson in "22 Jump Street"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Taft High School: Woodland Hills , California -
Hawthorne Christian School: Los Angeles , California -
Phoenix Institute of Technology: Phoenix , Arizona - 1987 - 1988

Notes

There is a Web site at www.icecube.com

"Rap is the network newscast black people never had."---Ice Cube, in the press notes for "Boyz N The Hood".

"I think I have become a more intelligent person, a person who can look at things from different ways just because I've seen the world more. I haven't lost the anger, but I now try to understand the reasons for the anger. In the beginning, I was [lashing out] at the forces that were holding you down. Now I am trying to understand why those forces exist and what to do about them."---Ice Cube to Los Angeles Times, April 23, 1995.

"From John Singleton, I really learned how to write. He always stressed that if you can write, write. But you have to develop your writing skills. Walter Hill ("Trespass" 1992) taught me how to be calm on the set, especially when there's pressure. Charles Burnett ("The Glass Shield" 1995) taught me subtle things about blocking and about not putting too much profanity in my movies. Laurence Fishburne gave me advice about acting, "you've got to know your character, then deliver it". Jon Voight ("Anaconda" 1997) taught me about concentrating and making the scenes better, and never taking your position for granted."---Ice Cube quoted in Los Angeles Times, May 21, 1997.

"John Singleton pulled me off the street and put me in a movie, because he felt a vibe. In giving someone the chance I didn't feel nervous. All they had to do was come to the audition and prove they could handle the role. And I tried to teach them as much as I could about the mechanics of acting."---Ice Cube on casting unknowns for "The Players Club" to Los Angeles Times, April 5, 1998.

"Hollywood has it sewed up. With a record, you could put it out yourself and still be on a major level. But in the movie business that road won't happen. At some point you're gonna have to attach to the machine."---Ice Cube in Premiere, April 1998.

Ice Cube on the comedies "Friday" and "Next Friday": "I wrote them because we had seen South Central movies like "Boyz N the Hood" and "Menace II Society" showing my neighborhood in one way, and I just wanted to show what I thought about it. A lot of the first "Friday" came out of things I came across as a youth. Growing up there, you don't think it's bad, it's just what you're used to. If [we had] shot "Friday" as a drama, it would have been a "Boyz N the Hood" type movie. If you look and really see what's going on, it ain't no lighthearted shit."---From Time Out New York, January 6-13, 2000.

"I didn't go to school for acting, I really get my lessons while I'm on the set. So I pick my roles carefully so that I can enhance the movies, not hurt them."--- Ice Cube to Time Out New York, January 6-13, 2000.

"You know, it's funny, 'cause if you asked me back in '91 would I ever be in a movie as a soldier, a US soldier, I'd have said get the hell out of here. Hell no! But that's what I like about the film, we showed there were a lot of people on both sides [of the Gulf War] who really didn't want to be there."---Ice Cube on "Three Kings" to The Guardian, February 25, 2000.

"Strive to be more than just the one in front of the camera. Sit back for years and make money and don't worry about using your body to survive. Ownership, control."---Ice Cube on becoming a producer and businessman, not just an actor and rapper to Los Angeles Times Magazine, March 26, 2000.

"With movies I've been able to grab a whole other audience, The rap game plays out after a while. I've been in it for 15 years. The same doing videos, going up to the radio station, 'Buy my record.' Fifteen years of that, you want to show how creative you are on different levels. We don't want all the pie. We just want a little piece of it."---Ice Cube to MTVNEWS.com, November 20, 2001.

"I've established myself on one side of the camera and I'm making my way on the other side, too. I'm setting it up for the future when my name won't be on the poster. But I'm always going to be creating. I ain't going to be no 50-year-old rapper, though, but you never know."---Ice Cube quoted in Time Out New York, March 7-14, 2002.

"I've got to look at myself as an actor first, because as an actor my career is going to the place I want it to be," he says. "I still do hard-core rap. It's just my movie career has kind of overtaken my music career."---Ice Cube quoted in Premiere, May 2005.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Kim Jackson. Married c. 1992; mother of Ice Cube's three children.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Hosea Jackson. Machinist, groundskeeper. Worker at UCLA.
mother:
Doris Jackson. Hospital clerk, cleaning woman. Worker at UCLA.
son:
O'Shea Jackson Jr. Born in 1991.

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute