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Trevor Howard

Trevor Howard

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  • Trevor Howard

    • Kat Dusek
    • 2012-04-29

    Early life Trevor Wallace Howard-Smith was born in Cliftonville, Kent, England, on 29 September 1913, the only son and elder child of Arthur John Howard-Smith, who worked as the Ceylon representative for Lloyd's of London, and his Canadian wife, Mabel Grey Wallace, a nurse. During his lifetime his year of birth was often given as 1916. Until he was five, he lived in Colombo, Ceylon, but then travelled with his mother until the age of eight, when he was sent to school at Clifton College, Bristol. Howard attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), acting on the London stage for several years before World War II. His first paid work was in the play Revolt in a Reformatory (1934), before he left RADA in 1935 to take small roles. That year, he was spotted by a Paramount studio talent scout, but turned down the offer of film work in favour of a career in theatre. This decision seemed justified when, in 1936, he was invited to join the Stratford Memorial Theatre and, in London, given the role of one of the students in French without Tears by Terence Rattigan, which ran for two years. He returned to Stratford in 1939. [edit] World War II At the outbreak of World War II, Howard volunteered for the RAF and British Army, but was turned down by both. However, in 1940, after working at the Colchester repertory theatre, he was called up into the Royal Corps of Signals, airborne division, becoming a Second Lieutenant, before he was invalided out in 1943. Although stories of his courageous wartime service earned him much respect among fellow actors and fans alike, files held in the Public Records Office reveal he had actually been discharged from the Army for mental instability and having a "psychopathic personality".[1] The service stories were originally fabricated without his consent for publicity purposes,[2] although Howard also recounted how he had parachuted into Nazi-occupied Norway and fought in the Allied invasion of Sicily. [edit] Acting career Howard

  • A MAN OF MANY FACES

    • Beatrice Howell
    • 2008-08-28

    I had only vague memory of Trevor Howard until I wathed the TCM features of his many movies. What a talent! I am amazed that I was not aware of it until now. He was so good as protagonist/antagonist, suffering physician, maniacal islander, etc. But I was especially surprised to see him play a sensitive lover in so many wonderful romantic movies. He was not what what one could consider handsome, but he stole my heart with his different characterizations of passion, cruelty, sensitivity, depravity, and sometimes comedic behavior. How I wished he could have lived longer. His was a tragic loss!!

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