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James W. Horne

James W. Horne

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Also Known As: Died: June 28, 1942
Born: December 14, 1881 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: San Francisco, California, USA Profession: Director ...
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COMPLETE FILMOGRAPHY WITH SYNOPSIS

Director (feature film)

1.
Captain Midnight (1942) as Director
2.
Perils of the Royal Mounted (1942) as Director
3.
Spider Returns, The (1941) as Director
Columbia's 14th serial (between "White Eagle" and "The Iron Claw") and the second serial based upon the character in the pulp magazine from Street and Smith "The Spider Magazine." Some sources, evidently based on their knowledge that L. Ron Hubbard and Norvell Page wrote stories for that magazine, have incorrectly credited them as being writers of this serial. The only serial that L. Ron Hubbard wrote was 1938's "The Secret of Treasure Island" filmed by Columbia, and the only connection Page has is that he wrote stories about the character in the magazine. Chapter One, "The Stolen Plans", has a gang of saboteurs, led by The Gargoyle, a mysterious and powerful agent for an unnamed country, playing havoc with National Defense projects. Socialite Richard Wentworth (Warren Hull), alias the Spider, returns to continue his crusade against the underworld. Wentworth calls a meeting of the nation's biggest business men, but the Gargoyle's men disrupt it with a tear-gas bomb. Chasing after them, Wentworth is taken prisoner and placed aboard an airplane. The pilot sets it afire and bails out, with Wentworth unconscious in the plunging-to-earth airplane as the first episode ends. Knox Manning asking if this is the end is easily answered by those who knew this was a 15 chapter serial, and that neither The Spider (in chapter two) nor Blinky McQuade (in chapter four) had yet made an entrance. The quest by Wentworth/Spider/McQuade to learn the identity of the Gargoyle isn't helped any by the fact that he is one of the businessnmen in attendance at every meeting Wentworth calls to discuss his future plans. Based on pure fun, this is one of the, to use a relative term, best of the James W. Horne-directed serials, but the absence of James Craven foaming at the mouth and screaming at the henchmen - "Idiots! Idiots! I'm surrounded by idiots!" - is sorely missed.
4.
Iron Claw, The (1941) as Director
5.
Green Archer, The (1941) as Director
Columbia's 12th serial of 57 total (following 1940's "Deadwood Dick" and ahead of 1941's "White Eagle") is another of director's James Horne's "classics" where he evidently figured that the same reactions that served him well in Laurel and Hardy films would work well in action serials where he has all hands, heroes and villains alike, doing some kind of over-the top "take", no matter the situation. This loose adaptation of an Edgar Wallace story finds Michael Bellamy (Kenne Duncan in his Kenneth Duncan period) inheriting Garr Castle, but his brother, Abel Bellamy (James Craven, as usual making Oil-Can Harry look smooth), has him imprisoned unjustly and moves into the castle himself. When Michael's wife, Elaine Bellamy (Dorothy Fay), fails to return after visiting Abel, her sister Valerie Howett (Iris Meredith), accompanied by their father, Parker Howett (Forrest Taylor) and private detective Spike Holland (Victor Jory, who even when playing the lead hero gets a villain's name), rent an adjoining estate, determined to investigate the case. Abel is afraid they will discover his association with a gang of jewel thieves and desperately - with Horne directing and Craven emoting, desperate is the only word - tries to have them all killed, and anybody else that might be standing around wondering how ten henchmen could fit in a six-passenger car. Each attempt is thwarted by the sudden appearance of the mysterious Green Archer, who is always there with his deadly bow and arrows whenever needed. It takes Abel most of the 15 chapters before he succeeds in capturing Spike, Valerie and Mr. Howett, but the shadow of the Green Archer's feathered Robin-Hood cap is on one of the walls of Garr Castle, and moving in.
6.
Deadwood Dick (1940) as Director
Columbia's 11th serial (between "Terry and the Pirates" and "The Green Archer") and the first western serial that James W. Horne solo-directed. The standard one-man-to-a-hoss and nobody walks rule of Westerns tended to cramp Horne's usual style of directing, in that he wasn't able to pour six or seven henchies into a four-door sedan and have them come tumbling out like the clowns at a circus, and the suprise with those familiar with his serials is that he didn't have all the henchmen riding around in a stagecoach or wagon. And, since they usually stayed on their horse, he was unable to have them rounding a corner on foot at an angle, freeze in surprise with their arms thrust over their heads, do a couple of takes and hot-foot it stage left for an alarmed feet-do-your-stuff exit. The character of "Deadwood Dick" in this serial is just a name that had a ring to it, was not intended to be based on the real-life "Deadwood Dick" in any manner, and those who delight in pointing out that the real "Deadwood Dick" was a black man and Columbia didn't know what they were doing miss an obvious point; the Columbia writers most likely knew that, but they weren't writing a factual history of the West and their fictional character could be what they wanted him to be. And was. That he ended up being played by the dullest actor (Don Douglas) ever to essay the lead role in a serial (at least until Republic came up with the likes of Bill Henry and Harry Lauter as serial leads) probably wasn't something they planned. This one had a little promise with veteran western actor Lane Chandler as "Wild Bill Hickok" but that promise soon faded with Hickok's demise in chapter one of this 15-chapter serial, where a renegade band led by a mysterious, masked character known as "The Skull" is terrorizing the town of Deadwood in the territory of Dakota. Dick Stanley (Don Douglas), editor of the Dakota Pioneer Press and a leading member of the Statehood For Dakota committee, is, unknown to his fellow townsmen and committee members, the equally mysterious Deadwood Dick, who is fighting The Skull and his gang. This makes everything about even as, unknown to Stanley, fellow-committeeman banker Transon Drew (Ed Cassidy) is The Skull. Well, actually, The Skull is a bit ahead as his "speaking voice" in costume is that of Forrest Taylor, who is nowhere in sight among the suspected citizens. Frank Butler, Stanley's "star' reporter is killed when he discovers that The Skull has plans to build an mpire of his own, and this also raises the possibility that Butler's sister, Anne (Lorna Gray), is also in danger. Chapter One ends with Deadwood Dick involved in a fight on a railroad handcar (filled with dynamite, naturally) with Jack McCall (Karl Hackett), the slayer of Wild Bill Hickok (Lane Chandler), and the handcar crashes to the bottom of a deep gorge and crashes...and explodes. Stanley/Deadwood Dick faces 13 more cliffhangers (mainly because he keeps letting Drew in on his plans to capture The Skull),before he unmasks The Skull in Chapter 15, "The Deadwood Express," Most of the action footage involving the Deadwood Dick character shows up again in 1954's "Riding With Buffalo Bill", where Marshall Reed as Buffalo Bill sans goatee, rides around in Deadwood Dick's costume.
7.
Shadow, The (1940) as Director
Columbia's 9th serial, slotted between "Overland With Kit Carson" and "Terry and the Pirates", was intended to have Lorna Gray in the role played by Veda Ann Borg, and to have been co-directed by D. Ross Lederman and Norman Deming. The credits specified the serial was "Based upon stories published in "The Shadow Magazine", while the ads proclaimed it to be "right out of the air waves and magazine stories." What appeared was a mixture of both with Lamont Cranston the true identity of The Shadow, although Lamont Cranston was only an occasional disguise of the pulp magazine Shadow. The hypnotic invisibility of the radio character was completely ignored, as was the almost invisible "Living Shadow" of the pulps.(In the serial, the only invisible man (The Black Tiger) was the villain, as even James Horne probably realized that six to ten henchmen taking orders from an invisible man was more plausible then six to ten henchman falling all over the place from unseen blows delivered by an invisible hero. Actually, based on how he directed serials, Horne would have most likely been in favor of henchies Charles King and Kit Guard exchanging punches with thin air.) Margot Lane (Veda Ann Borg) was a radio-only character until 1941 when she was picked up by the magazine and also the comic books. Police Commissioner Weston (Frank LaRue) and Inspector Cardona (Edward Peil) were characters who had appeared both in the radio series and the magazine, while Harry Vincent (Roger Moore II), used here as The Shadow and Cranston's chauffeur, general assistant and gofer, was from the pulp stories. Anybody watching the serial and expecting to hear Jory ask "who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men" had best bring a sack lunch and prepare for a long wait. The best line in the film, both in delivery and circumstances, comes when head henchie Flint (Jack Ingram) advises his hapless,clueless but always-game cohorts that "The Black Tiger IS REALLY mad this time." Horne utilized Richard Cramer, from Horne's Laurel and Hardy days, as the "voice" of The Black Tiger, and Cramer read it with over-the-top ripeness from beginning to end, and one almost expects assistant-head henchie Williams (Eddie Fetherston) to ask Flint how he could discern any degree of difference in the Black Tiger's attitude. That said, the plot begins with dynamited railroads, wrecked airplanes and blown-up industrial plants, with the clear message that nothing is safe from the machinations of the secret mastermind of the underworld known only as The Black Tiger. The man has plans to take over everything. While the police make only a few futile arrests, Lamont Cranston,noted scientist and criminologist, assumes the guise of a black-garbed, masked figure (The Shadow) to combat this evil. The police,of course, assume that The Shadow and The Black Tiger are one and the same. Cranston works with Police Commissioner Weston and a group of solid citizen businessmen including Joseph Rand (Charles K. French), Gilbert Hill (Gordon Hart), Stanford Marshall (Robert Fiske), Turner (J. Paul Jones) and Stephen Prescott (Griff Barnett), and somewhere in nearly every chapter Cranston, Weston, Cardona and these solid citizens gather at The Cobalt Club and Cranston brings them up to date on the next steps to rid the city of The Black Tiger. Since one of the solid citizens is actually The Black Tiger, these meetings, for the most part, are counter-productive.
8.
Flying G-Men (1939) as Director
9.
Spider's Web, The (1938) as Director
10.
All over Town (1937) as Director
11.
Way Out West (1937) as Director
A pair of tenderfeet try to get the deed to a gold mine to its rightful owner.
12.
The Bohemian Girl (1936) as Director
Two pickpockets raise a stolen child, not realizing she's royalty.
13.
Bonnie Scotland (1935) as Director
Two Americans in search of a Scottish inheritance wind up serving with the British in India.
14.
El alma de la fiesta (1931) as Director
15.
El príncipe del dólar (1930) as Director
16.
Una cana al aire (1930) as Dirección [Dir]
17.
Locuras de amor (1930) as Director
18.
Big Business (1930) as Director
19.
The Big Hop (1928) as Director
20.
Black Butterflies (1928) as Director
21.
College (1927) as Director
In this silent film, a high school egghead becomes a football hero in college.
22.
Kosher Kitty Kelly (1926) as Director
23.
The Cruise of the Jasper B (1926) as Director
24.
Youth and Adventure (1925) as Director
25.
Hail the Hero (1924) as Director
26.
American Manners (1924) as Director
27.
Laughing at Danger (1924) as Director
28.
Stepping Lively (1924) as Director
29.
The Yankee Consul (1924) as Director
30.
In Fast Company (1924) as Director
31.
Alimony (1924) as Director
32.
Can a Woman Love Twice? (1923) as Director
33.
The Sunshine Trail (1923) as Director
34.
A Man of Action (1923) as Director
35.
Itching Palms (1923) as Director
36.
Blow Your Own Horn (1923) as Director
37.
The Hottentot (1922) as Director
38.
Don't Doubt Your Wife (1922) as Director
39.
The Forgotten Law (1922) as Director
40.
The Bronze Bell (1921) as Director
41.
Occasionally Yours (1920) as Director
42.
Third Eye, The (1920) as Director
43.
Wait for Me (1920) as Director
44.
Midnight Man, The (1919) as Director
45.
Bull's Eye, The (1918) as Director
46.
Hands Up (1918) as Director
47.
The Pitfall (1915) as Director
48.
The Barnstormers (1915) as Director

Cast (feature film)

49.
The Girl Who Had Everything (1953) as Guest in town house
A criminal lawyer's daughter falls for one of his clients.
50.
Something to Live For (1952) as Young man
51.
A Place in the Sun (1951) as Tom Tipton
An ambitious young man wins an heiress's heart but has to cope with his former girlfriend's pregnancy.
52.
The Magnificent Yankee (1951) as Secretary
True story of the lifelong love affair between Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and his wife.
53.
Royal Wedding (1951) as Young man
A brother-and-sister musical team find romance when they tour to London for Elizabeth II's wedding.
54.
Samson and Delilah (1950) as Prince
Epic re-telling of the story of the Biblical strongman laid low by love.
55.
The Glass Menagerie (1950) as Caller
This first movie version of the Tennessee Williams play about a faded, aging Southern belle, her shy, crippled daughter and her "selfish dreamer" of a son more or less sticks to the original story, except for a compromise ending which strives to be more upbeat.
56.
A Life of Her Own (1950) as Male model
An innocent small-town girl climbs to the top of the modeling business man by man.
57.
Battleground (1949) as Transportation captain
American soldiers in France fight to survive a Nazi siege just before the Battle of the Bulge.
58.
A Southern Yankee (1948) as Soldier
A bellboy masquerades as a spy and lands behind enemy lines during the Civil War.
59.
Back Trail (1948) as Terry Dugan
Rancher Terry Dugan (James Horne) returns to Brentwood, ans is met by his sweetheart Helen Frazer (Mildred Coles) and Cahoose (Raymond Hatton.) Unknown to Helen, her dad, town banker Bob Frazer (Ted Adams) is being blackmailed by Frank Gilmore (Pierce Lyden) into revealing routes of stages carrying payrolls. Johnny Mack (Johnny Mack Brown), working for the State Protective League, fools the outlaws by filling a paybox with old newspapers and foils two attacks on him and Cahoose. Johnny is suspicious of Frazer, but the latter admits nothing. Gilmore's henchmen Pacos (Carol Henry) is jailed by Johnny after he is caught attacking a freighter. Gilmore forces Frazer to sneak a gun to Pacos. Johnny prevents Frazer from shooting Gilmore from ambush and Frazer reveals that he had once been a partner of Gilmore, and the latter had embezzled money from a client, for which Frazer was blamed and jailed. Helen, unaware of his past, overhears his confession and forgives him. As a ruse, Frazer is jailed, and gets Gilmore to go to the bank for a phony confession note.
60.
Good Sam (1948) as College boy
A family man helps out people in need and ends up broke in the process.
61.
Golden Earrings (1947) as Soldier
An English POW tries to hide from the Nazis by posing as a gypsy.
62.
Living in a Big Way (1947) as 2nd lieutenant
A returning GI and his war bride finally get to know each other and don't really like what they see.
63.
Unconquered (1947) as Royal American officer
An English convict girl sent to the colonies gets mixed up in the war with the Indians.
64.
The Pitfall (1915) as
65.
The Invisible Power (1914) as Piano player

Writer (feature film)

66.
Green Archer, The (1941) as Screenwriter
Columbia's 12th serial of 57 total (following 1940's "Deadwood Dick" and ahead of 1941's "White Eagle") is another of director's James Horne's "classics" where he evidently figured that the same reactions that served him well in Laurel and Hardy films would work well in action serials where he has all hands, heroes and villains alike, doing some kind of over-the top "take", no matter the situation. This loose adaptation of an Edgar Wallace story finds Michael Bellamy (Kenne Duncan in his Kenneth Duncan period) inheriting Garr Castle, but his brother, Abel Bellamy (James Craven, as usual making Oil-Can Harry look smooth), has him imprisoned unjustly and moves into the castle himself. When Michael's wife, Elaine Bellamy (Dorothy Fay), fails to return after visiting Abel, her sister Valerie Howett (Iris Meredith), accompanied by their father, Parker Howett (Forrest Taylor) and private detective Spike Holland (Victor Jory, who even when playing the lead hero gets a villain's name), rent an adjoining estate, determined to investigate the case. Abel is afraid they will discover his association with a gang of jewel thieves and desperately - with Horne directing and Craven emoting, desperate is the only word - tries to have them all killed, and anybody else that might be standing around wondering how ten henchmen could fit in a six-passenger car. Each attempt is thwarted by the sudden appearance of the mysterious Green Archer, who is always there with his deadly bow and arrows whenever needed. It takes Abel most of the 15 chapters before he succeeds in capturing Spike, Valerie and Mr. Howett, but the shadow of the Green Archer's feathered Robin-Hood cap is on one of the walls of Garr Castle, and moving in.
67.
Way Out West (1937) as Contract Writer
A pair of tenderfeet try to get the deed to a gold mine to its rightful owner.
68.
Midnight Man, The (1919) as From Story
69.
Bull's Eye, The (1918) as From Story

Director (short)

70.
Thicker Than Water (1935)
Oliver Hardy suffers some pretty serious money troubles in this comedic short film.
71.
HOT MONEY (1935)
In this short comedy, Patsy Kelly and Thelma Todd come across some much needed money that just happens to be stolen.
72.
TABASCO KID, THE (1932)
In this comedic short film, a man must defend a ranch from an infamous bandit in order to impress his boss' daughter.
73.
RED NOSES (1932)
In this short film, comedic duo Thelma Todd and ZaSu Pitts get sent to a spa while recovering from being sick.
74.
LOVE PAINS (1932)
In this comedic short film, two soda jerks become jealous of a new employee because all of the girls like him best.
75.
Any Old Port! (1932)
In this short film, Hardy arranges for Laurel to fight at a local boxing hall to raise some money.
76.
Be Big! (1931)
In this short film, two married men feign illness so they can ditch their wives and attend a lodge party.
77.
Politiquerias (1931)
Spanish-language version of the Laurel and Hardy short Chickens Come Home.
78.
Les Carottiers (1931)
French language version of the Laurel and Hardy shorts Be Big! and Laughing Gravy.
79.
One Good Turn (1931)
Two vagrants try to repay the kindly old lady who helped them in this comedic short.
80.
THUNDERING TENORS (1931)
Charley Chase is supposed to sing at a fancy party, but gets a fish bone caught in his throat in this comedic short.
81.
Come Clean (1931)
After saving a woman, Laurel and Hardy get in trouble with their own wives in this comedic short film.
82.
Our Wife (1931)
A man tries to help his best friend elope in this comedic short film.
83.
Chickens Come Home- (1931)
In this comedic short film, a man risks his marriage to help his best friend deal with blackmailers.
84.
Los Calaveras ("Be Big!" & "Laughing Gravy", Spanish) (1931)
Spanish language version of two Laurel and Hardy shorts ("Be Big!" and "Laughing Gravy") edited together into one continuous film.
85.
Girl Shock (1930)
A man goes into hysterics whenever his fiancée touches him in this comedic short.
86.
WHISPERING WHOOPEE (1930)
A man hires three "party girls" to help him land a business deal in this comedic short film.
87.
Fifty Million Husbands (1930)
In this short film, an estranged couple visit their old apartment inhabited by new tenants, who misunderstand the purpose of their visit.
88.
Dollar Dizzy (1930)
In this short film, two millionaires try to escape the suitors out to marry them for their money.
89.
Looser Than Loose (1930)
In this comedic short film, Charley Chase must impress an important client without breaking up his engagement.
90.
Fast Work (1930)
In this comedic short, Charley Chase mistakes an escaped lunatic for the father of a girl he's interested in.
91.
The King (1930)
In this comedic short film, a game of "musical beds" ensues when a queen attempts to trap a king in an affair.
92.
High C's (1930)
In this comedic short, an entertainer serving in World War I puts music before military service.
93.
Big Business (1929)
In this comedic short film, a quarrel between two salesmen and a potential customer leads to an orgy of destruction.

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