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Also Known As: Died:
Born: February 2, 1942 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Greenwood, South Carolina, USA Profession: actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Blond character player and occasional lead of films and TV who played impetuous, thrill-seeking and sometimes violent country boys early in his career and later specialized in sturdy, though occasionally still villainous, authority figures. Hopkins studied under Uta Hagen and at the Desilu Playhouse, where his work netted him an agent and an audition for director Sam Peckinpah. Soon thereafter he made his film debut in Peckinpah's violent, strikingly elegiac landmark Western, "The Wild Bunch" (1969). With his tousled hair, clear eyes and Southern drawl, Hopkins adeptly played a variety of yokels, wily and stupid alike, who could be sensitive and sympathetic. More often, though, he did a delicious job of unsettling viewers with his potent squint as deceptive villains or as blatantly reckless types, given to macho posturing and its attendant mayhem. The tough, laconic Hopkins was well-suited to action fare, from the war epic "The Bridge at Remagen" (1969) to the TV-movie "The Kansas City Massacre" (1975), in which he played gangster "Pretty Boy" Floyd, to crime dramas including Peckinpah's "The Getaway" (1972), "White Lightning" (1973), "Midnight Express" (1978) and the direct-to-video "President's...

Blond character player and occasional lead of films and TV who played impetuous, thrill-seeking and sometimes violent country boys early in his career and later specialized in sturdy, though occasionally still villainous, authority figures. Hopkins studied under Uta Hagen and at the Desilu Playhouse, where his work netted him an agent and an audition for director Sam Peckinpah. Soon thereafter he made his film debut in Peckinpah's violent, strikingly elegiac landmark Western, "The Wild Bunch" (1969). With his tousled hair, clear eyes and Southern drawl, Hopkins adeptly played a variety of yokels, wily and stupid alike, who could be sensitive and sympathetic. More often, though, he did a delicious job of unsettling viewers with his potent squint as deceptive villains or as blatantly reckless types, given to macho posturing and its attendant mayhem.

The tough, laconic Hopkins was well-suited to action fare, from the war epic "The Bridge at Remagen" (1969) to the TV-movie "The Kansas City Massacre" (1975), in which he played gangster "Pretty Boy" Floyd, to crime dramas including Peckinpah's "The Getaway" (1972), "White Lightning" (1973), "Midnight Express" (1978) and the direct-to-video "President's Target" (1993). His rugged stance has made him especially at home in the Westerns which have kept him busy, from "Monte Walsh" (1970), "The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing" (1973) and "Posse" (1975) through TV-movies like "The Last Ride of the Dalton Gang" (1979) and "Louis L'Amour's 'Down the Long Hills'" (1986). He was fine in the feature "The Ballad of Little Jo" (1993), as the rancher who gives the sexually disguised heroine a chance at sheep herding. Hopkins' iconic value in Westerns was even used reflexively in "The Day of the Locust" (1975), an adaptation of Nathanael West's classic novel about Hollywood, with Hopkins as a troubled cowboy stuntman.

Although Hopkins gave a fine performance in his first feature lead, the intriguing if minor road picture "The Only Way Home" (1972), he never quite caught on as a leading man. He has kept busy, though, if sometimes in rather minor credits. His roles as aggressive outsiders have gradually been replaced by lawmen and other similar roles: In three features made almost back to back, "Trapper County War", "The Bounty Hunter" (both 1989) and "The Final Alliance" (1990) he played sheriffs. Hopkins has also tried TV series, including a stint as the bush pilot who aids the woodsy "Doc Elliot" (1973-74), and one season as Matthew Blaisdel, the geologist enamored of Krystle (Linda Evans), on the primetime soap, "Dynasty" (1981). Hopkins occasionally reprised the role during the show's long run, briefly terrorizing the entire cast during the 1987-88 season.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Open Window (2007)
2.
 Shade (2004) Scarne
3.
4.
5.
 Time Served (2000)
6.
 South of Heaven, West of Hell (2000) Doc Angus
7.
 Vice (2000) Savannah'S Lawyer
8.
 Getting to Know You (1999) Officer Caminetto
9.
 Uncle Sam (1998)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Served with the US Army in the late 1950s
:
Acting roles in several productions of the Desilu Playhouse led to his getting an agent, and consequently an audition with director Sam Peckinpah
1969:
Made film acting debut in Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch"; was also the first of three films for director Peckinpah
1971:
Earliest TV appearances included a Western-comedy series pilot, "Cat Ballou", based on the hit film of 1965
1972:
First feature lead and first top billing, "The Only Way Home"
1973:
TV series debut, as Eldred McCoy on the ABC drama series, "Doc Elliot", starring James Franciscus; the pilot film for the series also marked Hopkins's TV-movie debut
1977:
First non-US film, "Tentacoli/Tentacles", an Italian production with a primarily American cast also made available in an English-language version
1977:
Acted in first TV miniseries, "Aspen"
1978:
Had featured role in "Midnight Express"
1981:
Played Matthew Blaisdel on the ABC primetime serial drama, "Dynasty"; later reprised the role several times during the course of the show's nine-season run
1986:
Last TV-movie for five years, "A Smoky Mountain Christmas"
1990:
Journeyed to South Africa to make a feature, "The Final Alliance", starring David Hasselhoff
1991:
First TV-movie in five years, "Blood Ties"
1993:
Co-starred in "The Ballad of Little Jo"
1997:
Appeared in Oliver Stone's "U-Turn"
1998:
Had supporting role in Richard Linklater's "The Newton Boys"
2004:
Cast as Scarne in the drama "Shade," set in the world of L.A. poker hustlers
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

HB Studio: New York , New York -
Desilu Workshop: Hollywood , California -

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Sian Hopkins. Has one other child.
wife:
Sian Hopkins. Executive assistant. Married c. 1989; worked for Don Johnson; mother of Matthew.

Family close complete family listing

daughter:
Jane Hopkins. Austrian.
son:
Matthew McCoy Hopkins. Has four by Lewis Kaden.
son:
Matthew McCoy Hopkins. Born July 11, 1995; mother Sian Hopkins, executive assistant to Don Johnson.

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