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Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock

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Alfred Hitchcock: 3-Disc Collector's... "Alfred Hitchcock: 3-Disc Collector's Edition" features five early minor... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Alfred Hitchcock: The Masterpiece... 14 Movies · 15 Discs · All Digitally Remastered14 of the finest works from the... more info $119.98was $119.98 Buy Now

Family Plot DVD One of Alfred Hitchcock's best works, "Family Plot" (1976) is a dark comedy with... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Fox Horror Classics DVD This spine-tingling collection features three long-lost horror classics,... more info $26.98was $26.98 Buy Now

Frenzy DVD Master of cinematic suspense Alfred Hitchcock returned to his native England and... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Shadow Of A Doubt DVD An Alfred Hitchcock MasterpieceJoseph Cotton stars as Uncle Charlie, a... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, Sir Alfred Hitchcock Died: April 29, 1980
Born: August 13, 1899 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Leytonstone, England, GB Profession: director, screenwriter, producer, assistant director, production designer, title designer, layout assistant, technical estimator, sketch artist

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

The acknowledged master of the thriller genre he virtually invented, director Alfred Hitchcock was also a brilliant technician who deftly blended sex, suspense and humor while creating a number of motifs and devices - most famously the MacGuffin - to advance his intricate plots. Hitchcock went through four distinct periods throughout his career, starting with his silent period where he made "The Lodger" (1926) and a handful of others before entering the sound era and properly beginning his so-called British period. During the 1930s, he honed his master of suspense chops with a number of acclaimed espionage films like "The 39 Steps" (1935), "The Secret Agent" (1936) and "Sabotage" (1936). He attracted the attention of Hollywood with "The Lady Vanishes" (1938) and embarked on the third phase of his career, starting with "Rebecca" (1940), "Foreign Correspondent" (1940), "Suspicion" (1941) and "Shadow of a Doubt" (1943). After "Spellbound" (1945), Hitchcock directed "Notorious" (1946), his most emotionally mature film at the time. Fond of ordinary men accused of crimes they did not commit and icy blondes in despair, Hitchcock entered the most artistically fruitful part of his career, directing "Strangers...

The acknowledged master of the thriller genre he virtually invented, director Alfred Hitchcock was also a brilliant technician who deftly blended sex, suspense and humor while creating a number of motifs and devices - most famously the MacGuffin - to advance his intricate plots. Hitchcock went through four distinct periods throughout his career, starting with his silent period where he made "The Lodger" (1926) and a handful of others before entering the sound era and properly beginning his so-called British period. During the 1930s, he honed his master of suspense chops with a number of acclaimed espionage films like "The 39 Steps" (1935), "The Secret Agent" (1936) and "Sabotage" (1936). He attracted the attention of Hollywood with "The Lady Vanishes" (1938) and embarked on the third phase of his career, starting with "Rebecca" (1940), "Foreign Correspondent" (1940), "Suspicion" (1941) and "Shadow of a Doubt" (1943). After "Spellbound" (1945), Hitchcock directed "Notorious" (1946), his most emotionally mature film at the time. Fond of ordinary men accused of crimes they did not commit and icy blondes in despair, Hitchcock entered the most artistically fruitful part of his career, directing "Strangers on a Train" (1951), "To Catch a Thief" (1955) and "The Wrong Man" (1956) alongside masterpieces like "Rear Window" (1954), "Vertigo" (1958), "North by Northwest" (1959) and "Psycho" (1960). Though he faltered after "The Birds" (1963), Hitchcock remained a highly influential director whose life and career retained a high level of interest decades after his death.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Family Plot (1976) Director
2.
  Frenzy (1972) Director
3.
  Topaz (1969) Director
4.
  Torn Curtain (1966) Director
5.
  Marnie (1964) Director
6.
  The Birds (1963) Director
7.
  Psycho (1960) Director
8.
  North by Northwest (1959) Director
9.
  Vertigo (1958) Director
10.
  The Wrong Man (1957) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Night Will Fall (2014)
2.
 Innocent Blood (1992) Man With Cello Case
3.
 Frenzy (1972) Bystander
4.
 Topaz (1969) Man being pushed in wheelchair
5.
 Torn Curtain (1966) Man with baby on lap, sitting in hotel lobby
6.
 Marnie (1964) Man in hotel corridor
7.
 The Birds (1963) Man at pet shop
8.
 Psycho (1960) Man in front of real estate office
9.
 North by Northwest (1959) Man rushing toward bus
10.
 Vertigo (1958) Man walking past shipyard
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1920:
Began career as title designer for London branch of Famous Players-Lasky
:
Made head of title department
1922:
Made assistant director when Famous Players taken over by Michael Balcon's production company
1922:
Short film directing debut with "Number 13/Mrs. Peabody" (never completed)
1923:
Hired as assistant director by Balcon-Saville-Freedman
1923:
First film as assistant director, art director and sole writer "Woman to Woman"
1925:
Feature film directing debut with "The Pleasure Garden"
1927:
Made the suspense thriller "The Lodger", starring Ivor Novello
1927:
Co-wrote (with Alma Reville) and directed, "The Ring"
1929:
Directed first British synchronous sound film "Blackmail"; also co-wrote script with Charles Bennet and Benn W. Levy
1930:
Set up public relations firm Hitchcock Baker Productions
1932:
Wrote and directed the comedy thriller "Number Seventeen"
1934:
Helmed "The Man Who Knew Too Much"
1935:
Directed the classic "The 39 Steps"
1938:
Made "The Lady Vanishes"
1939:
Signed by David O. Selznick, moved to Hollywood
1940:
American film directing debut with "Rebecca", which won the Best Picture Oscar; received first Academy Award nomination as Best Director
1941:
Made the atypical screwball comedy "Mr. and Mrs. Smith"
1941:
Directed Joan Fontaine in an Oscar-winning performance in "Suspicion"; first film with Cary Grant
1943:
Made "Saboteur" and "Shadow of a Doubt"
1944:
Earned second Best Director Oscar nomination with "Lifeboat"
1945:
Helmed "Spellbound", the first of three films with Ingrid Bergman; earned third Academy Award nomination as Best Director
1946:
Made the classic "Notorious", featuring Bergman and Grant
1948:
Initial collaboration with James Stewart, "Rope"
1949:
Last film with Ingrid Bergman, "Under Capricorn"
1951:
Made "Strangers on a Train", starring Robert Walker and Farley Granger
1953:
Helmed "I Confess", starring Montgomery Clift as a priest
1954:
Directed Grant and Grace Kelly in "Dial M for Murder"
1954:
Teamed Kelly with James Stewart in "Rear Window"; fourth Oscar nomination for Best Director
1955:
Third film with Grace Kelly, "To Catch a Thief"; also starred Cary Grant
1955:
Hosted and executive produced the anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (CBS, 1955-1960; NBC, 1960-1962); also directed 17 episodes
1956:
Remade "The Man Who Wasn't There" with James Stewart and Doris Day
:
Produced the anthology series "Suspicion" (NBC); directed one episode ("Four o'Clock")
1958:
Last film with James Stewart, "Vertigo"
1959:
Final collaboration with Cary Grant, "North by Northwest"
1960:
Directed the classic "Psycho", featuring Anthony Perkins; earned fifth and last Best Director Oscar nomination
1960:
Helmed the "Incident at a Corner" episode of "Ford Star Time" (CBS)
:
Hosted and executive produced "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" (CBS, 1962-1964; NBC, 1964-1965); also directed the episode entitled "I Saw the Whole Thing"
1963:
First of two films with Tippi Hedren, "The Birds"
1964:
Second movie with Hedren, "Marnie"
1966:
Teamed Julie Andrews and Paul Newman in "Torn Curtain"
1969:
Helmed the spy thriller "Topaz"
1972:
Directed "Frenzy", about a serial killer
1976:
Final feature, "Family Plot"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of London: -
School of Engineering and Navigation: -
St Ignatius College: - 1908

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Alma Lucy Reville. Film editor, script girl. Born c. 1900; married in 1926; survived him; died on July 6, 1982.

Family close complete family listing

father:
William Hitchcock. Poultry dealer, fruit importer. Catholic, died when Hitchcock was 14 on December 12, 1914.
mother:
Emma Hitchcock. Catholic.
daughter:
Patricia Hitchcock O'Connell. Born c. 1929.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Hitch: The Life and Times of Alfred Hitchcock" Pantheon
"Hitchcock" Simon & Schuster
"The Hitchcock Romance"
"Hitchcock: The Murderous Gaze"
"Hitchcock on Hitchcock: Selected Writings and Interviews"
"The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock" Da Capo Press
"Hitchcock's Notebooks: An Authentic and Illustrated Look at the Mind of Alfred Hitchcock" Spike
"Hitchcock Becomed 'Hitchcock': The British Years" Midnight Marquee Press
"English Hitchcock" Cameron & Hollis
"Writing with Hitchcock: The Collaboration of Alfred Hitchcock and John Michael Hayes" Faber and Faber
VIEW COMPLETE BIBLIOGRAPHY

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