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Katharine Hepburn

Katharine Hepburn

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State Of The... Academy Award-winners Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy flourish under the... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Little Women... Much rested on the slender shoulders of Little Women. Hollywood wanted to see if... more info $7.99was $12.98 Buy Now

Rooster... Two of the most popular stars in screen history are brought together for the... more info $9.99was $9.99 Buy Now

Desk Set DVD ... Bunny Watson (Katharine Hepburn) heads up the research department at the Federal... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Lion In... "One Of The Year's Best Films." -The Hollywood ReporterKatharine Hepburn... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Summertime:... An American spinster's dream of romance finally becomes a bittersweet reality... more info $29.95was $29.95 Buy Now

Also Known As: Died: June 29, 2003
Born: May 12, 1907 Cause of Death: natural causes
Birth Place: Hartford, Connecticut, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1915:
First performed publicly at age 8 as part of a women's suffrage rally (date approximate)
1919:
Appeared in amateur stage productions at age 12 (date approximate)
1928:
Moved to Baltimore to join stock company; with company made professional stage acting debut as lady-in-waiting in "Czarina"
1928:
Broadway debut in "Night Hostess"
1928:
First came to the attention of the American public as Veronica Sims in "These Days" on Broadway
1929:
First US stage tour, "Death Takes a Holiday"
:
Met playwright Philip Barry when she signed on as an understudy for the Broadway production of his successful comedy-drama "Holiday"
1932:
Broadway starring role as Antiope, the Amazon queen, in the comedy, "The Warrior Husband", led to film contract
1932:
Moved to Hollywood; signed with RKO at $1500/week; originally had no interest in movies and came up with the $1500 figure thinking the studio would consider it ridiculously high; RKO surprised her by agreeing to it
1932:
Film acting debut in "A Bill of Divorcement"; also marked first collaboration with director George Cukor
1933:
Enjoyed considerable popular and critical success in "Little Women" and "Morning Glory" (for which she won her first Best Actress Oscar)
1934:
Her brief, unsuccessful return to Broadway in "The Lake" prompted the famous put-down in a drama review by Dorothy Parker: "Miss Hepburn runs the gamut of emotions from A to B"
1935:
Hit picture, "Alice Adams", restored her diminished boxoffice stature momentarily; received Best Actress Oscar nomination
1936:
Career mired in temporary slump due to boxoffice failure of several films; labelled 'box office poison' in 1938 by motion picture exhibitors; other stars named included Fred Astaire, Joan Crawford and Marlene Dietrich
1937:
Toured the USA in a stage adaptation of Charlotte Bronte's classic novel "Jane Eyre"
1938:
Lent to Columbia to play leading role in screen adaptation of Philip Barry's "Holiday"
1938:
Bought out RKO contract rather than appear in "Mother Carey's Chickens"; role subsequently was played by Ruby Keeler
1939:
Enjoyed resounding Broadway success in the role of Tracy Lord in Barry's "The Philadelphia Story", to which she acquired the movie rights
1940:
Sold the film rights to "The Philadelphia Story" to MGM, with whom she signed a contract; stipulated that she reprise role of Tracy Lord; also had a say in choice of co-stars and director; film's popularity rejuvenated her career in movies; earned Best Actress Academy Award nomination
1941:
Narrated war-time short subject, "Women in Defense"
1942:
First of nine co-starring film appearances opposite Spencer Tracy, "Woman of the Year"; received Oscar nomination as Best Actress
1942:
Returned to Broadway to star in Barry's "Without Love" (without heat); insisted the radiators be turned off because they made too much noise and played to freezing audiences in the winter
1945:
Starred in the film version of "Without Love" opposite Spencer Tracy
1949:
Made one of her best-remembered films opposite Tracy, "Adam's Rib"
1950:
Returned to Broadway to play Rosalind in a production of Shakespeare's "As You Like It"
1951:
Journeyed to Africa to act opposite Humphrey Bogart in her first film shot largely on location outside the USA, "The African Queen"; earned fifth Best Actress Oscar nomination
1952:
Made London stage debut in a production of George Bernard Shaw's "The Millionairess"; also brought the production to Broadway
1952:
Last feature film collaboration with director George Cukor, "Pat and Mike", co-starring Spencer Tracy
1955:
Oscar-nominated for her turn as a spinster in Venice in "Summertime"
1955:
Toured Australia with Britain's Old Vic theatrical company in productions of Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice", "The Taming of the Shrew" and "Measure for Measure"
1956:
Received another Best Actress Academy Award nomination for "The Rainmaker"
1957:
Performed in productions of "The Merchant of Venice" and "Much Ado About Nothing" with the American Shakespeare Festival
1959:
Earned eighth Best Actress Oscar nomination for "Suddenly, Last Summer"
1960:
Returned to the American Shakespeare Festival to act in productions of "Twelfth Night" and "Antony and Cleopatra"
1962:
Returned to films after an absence of three years to co-star in an adaptation of Eugene O'Neill's "Long Day's Journey Into Night" directed by Sidney Lumet; garnered a Best Actress Academy Award nomination
:
Put career on hold to help Spencer Tracy's wife take care of the ailing actor
1967:
Returned to films after a five year absence to co-star with Tracy in their last film together (and the last of his career), "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner"; won second Academy Award as Best Actress
1968:
Starred as Eleanor of Aquataine in "The Lion in Winter"; became most nominated actress and first to win three Best Actress Oscars; tie with Barbra Streisand was first and (to date) only instance in that category in the Academy's history
1969:
Earliest TV appearances include being one of the interviewees for the NBC documentary TV special "Hollywood: The Selznick Years"
1969:
Over 30 years after being named 'box office poison' in a poll of motion picture exhibitors, made the annual top ten list of box office stars conducted each year by Quigley Publications
:
Returned to Broadway after many years to star in a musical of designer Coco Chanel, "Coco"; received Tony nomination for Best Actress in a Musical
1973:
Made TV acting debuts in an ABC adaptation of Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie"; received first Emmy nomination
1975:
Collaborated again with director George Cukor on his first TV-movie, "Love Among the Ruins" (ABC); co-starred with Laurence Olivier; won Emmy Award
1976:
Returned to Broadway as star of "A Matter of Gravity"
1977:
Portrayed by Tovah Feldshuh in the TV biography "The Amazing Howard Hughes" (CBS)
1979:
Last collaboration with George Cukor, the TV-movie remake of "The Corn Is Green" (CBS)
1981:
Earned an unprecendented fourth Best Actress Academy Award for "On Golden Pond"; first screen teaming with Henry Fonda
:
Returned to Broadway to star opposite Dorothy Loudon in "The West Side Waltz"
1985:
Last feature film for nine years, "Grace Quigley"
1986:
Hosted the PBS documentary tribute, "The Spencer Tracy Legacy: A Tribute by Katharine Hepburn"
:
Appeared on "Michael Jackson" (1988), an episode of the ongoing series "Motown on Showtime", and the later CBS special "Michael Jackson . . . The Legend Continues" (1992), both documentary and interview tribute specials to the pop singer and songwriter
1993:
Hosted and starred in "Katharine Hepburn: All About Me," an autobiographical documentary produced by TNT
1994:
Returned to feature films to play a supporting 'guest star' role in "Love Affair"; provided the high point (as Warren Beatty's feisty aunt) of this soulless remake of "An Affair to Remember" (1957)
1994:
Last screen performance the NBC-TV movie "One Christmas"

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