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Richard Corliss

Richard Corliss

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Also Known As: Richard Nelson Corliss Died:
Born: March 6, 1944 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Profession: critic, magazine editor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Prolific film reviewer and journalist Richard Corliss was Time magazineâ¿¿s longest-running movie critic, penning approximately 2,500 articles and features for the magazine, while also serving as one of the leading proponents of film theory that placed the screenwriter on an equal level of importance with the director. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on March 6, 1944, Richard Corliss was the son of businessman Paul William Corliss and his wife, Elizabeth, a schoolteacher. He saw his first movie at the age of 5 and despite the rigorous Jesuit teachings of his formative education, he continued to be fascinated by them into his teenage years. At 16, he discovered the work of Ingmar Bergman and other filmmakers from the vibrant European arthouse cinema scene of the 1950s and â¿¿60s; pictures like "The Seventh Seal" (1956) would have a profound impact on his understanding of cinemaâ¿¿s possibilities. After graduating from St. Josephâ¿¿s College in Philadelphia, Corliss moved to New York, where he did graduate work at Columbia and New York University. He also began publishing film reviews in magazines like The National Review and Macleanâ¿¿s. In 1970, Corliss became the editor of Film Comment, where he...

Prolific film reviewer and journalist Richard Corliss was Time magazineâ¿¿s longest-running movie critic, penning approximately 2,500 articles and features for the magazine, while also serving as one of the leading proponents of film theory that placed the screenwriter on an equal level of importance with the director. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on March 6, 1944, Richard Corliss was the son of businessman Paul William Corliss and his wife, Elizabeth, a schoolteacher. He saw his first movie at the age of 5 and despite the rigorous Jesuit teachings of his formative education, he continued to be fascinated by them into his teenage years. At 16, he discovered the work of Ingmar Bergman and other filmmakers from the vibrant European arthouse cinema scene of the 1950s and â¿¿60s; pictures like "The Seventh Seal" (1956) would have a profound impact on his understanding of cinemaâ¿¿s possibilities. After graduating from St. Josephâ¿¿s College in Philadelphia, Corliss moved to New York, where he did graduate work at Columbia and New York University. He also began publishing film reviews in magazines like The National Review and Macleanâ¿¿s. In 1970, Corliss became the editor of Film Comment, where he established his long-standing belief that the screenwriter was as important a figure in the development of a motion picture as the director. That thesis stood in direct conflict to the "auteur theory" of Andrew Sarris, his former professor at New York University, as well as the core of Pauline Kaelâ¿¿s criticism. In 1980, Corliss joined the editorial staff at Time, where he would remain its chief film critic for more than three decades. His work displayed a diverse palate in terms of genre and style: he loved Disney animation and the films of Steven Spielberg with the same level of devotion he displayed for Bergman and Werner Herzog. He heaped equal praise on violent dramas by Quentin Tarantino and intimate drawing-room romances, but had little patience for overly sentimental films or broad comedies. But no matter what the assignment â¿¿ which, over time, included theater reviews, music coverage and even the famous "Who Shot J.R.?" storyline from "Dallas" (CBS, 1978-1991), which put him on Timeâ¿¿s cover â¿¿ Corliss brought enthusiasm, insightfulness and a gift for extraordinary use of language to his work. In addition to his print work for Time, Corliss also wrote for the magazineâ¿¿s web presence, for which he penned a column on pop culture of the past called "That Old Feeling." He also wrote three books, including 1974â¿¿s essay collection Talking Pictures, and Lolita (1995), which examined both the Vladimir Nabokov novel and the film adaptation by Stanley Kubrick. Corliss was also a consistent presence at film festivals, most notably Cannes, and on television talk shows and film documentaries. In 2015, Corliss suffered a major stroke that would eventually claim his life on April 23, 2015. His passing was mourned by figures throughout the film production and journalism worlds.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

3.
 Artists and Entertainers (2001) Interviewee
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Milestones close milestones

1966:
Was film critic for NATIONAL REVIEW
:
On staff of film department of Museum of Modern Art
:
Served as editor of FILM COMMENT
:
Was member of the selection committee of the New York Film Festival
:
Worked as film critic for NEW TIMES
1980:
Wrote film reviews for SOHO WEEKLY NEWS
1980:
Joined staff of TIME as associate editor; promoted to senior writer in 1985
1974:
Publishes first book, <i>Talking Pictures</i>
1995:
Publishes third and final book, <i>Lolita</i>
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Education

St Joseph's College: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania - 1965
Columbia University: New York , New York - 1967
New York University: - 1969

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Mary Elizabeth Corliss. Archivist. With film stills department of the Museum of Modern Art; married on August 31, 1969.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Paul William Corliss.
mother:
Elizabeth Brown.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Talking Pictures: Screenwriters in the American Cinema 1927-1973" Overlook Press
"Greta Garbo" Pyramid Books

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