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Hal Hartley

Hal Hartley

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Flirt ... Hal Hartley's FLIRT spans three continents, three languages, three races, two... more info $18.95was $29.95 Buy Now

Also Known As: Ned Rifle, Hal Hartley Jr. Died:
Born: November 3, 1959 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Lindenhurst, New York, USA Profession: director, screenwriter, producer, composer, editor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Hal Hartley was one of the most revered independent filmmakers of the late 1980s and '90s, known for his original style that blended deadpan comedy with impactful drama and social satire. Hartley's directing career began in earnest in the late '80s with "The Unbelievable Truth," an offbeat love story between a Long Island teen and an older mechanic. The film was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the 1990 Sundance Film Festival, thus ushering in what would prove to be the most successful decade of Hartley's career. In the ensuing decade, Hartley shot over a dozen short films and features, most notably "Trust" (1990), "Amateur" (1994), "Flirt" (1995), and "Henry Fool" (1997), all of which were independently financed with Hartley wearing multiple hats as director, writer, producer and composer. Hartley continued making films at a prolific rate throughout the 2000s, including "No Such Thing" (2001) and the "Henry Fool" sequel "Fay Grim," thus proving the acclaimed independent filmmaker had shown no signs of slowing down in the 21st century, even though his films were no longer as critically acclaimed as before.Born and raised in a working class suburb of Long Island, New York, Hartley showed an...

Hal Hartley was one of the most revered independent filmmakers of the late 1980s and '90s, known for his original style that blended deadpan comedy with impactful drama and social satire. Hartley's directing career began in earnest in the late '80s with "The Unbelievable Truth," an offbeat love story between a Long Island teen and an older mechanic. The film was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the 1990 Sundance Film Festival, thus ushering in what would prove to be the most successful decade of Hartley's career. In the ensuing decade, Hartley shot over a dozen short films and features, most notably "Trust" (1990), "Amateur" (1994), "Flirt" (1995), and "Henry Fool" (1997), all of which were independently financed with Hartley wearing multiple hats as director, writer, producer and composer. Hartley continued making films at a prolific rate throughout the 2000s, including "No Such Thing" (2001) and the "Henry Fool" sequel "Fay Grim," thus proving the acclaimed independent filmmaker had shown no signs of slowing down in the 21st century, even though his films were no longer as critically acclaimed as before.

Born and raised in a working class suburb of Long Island, New York, Hartley showed an early interest in art. He went on to study painting at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston in the late 1970s and eventually became interested in directing films. By the early 1980s Hartley was studying filmmaking at the State University of New York at Purchase, where he cultivated a strong network of actors and film technicians that he would later employ in all of his movies. Hartley graduated from college in 1984 and began taking a series of low-paying production assistant jobs to pay the bills. It was also during this time that he began making short films in and around Long Island. By the late '80s Hartley was fed up with dead end P.A. work, and managed to convince his boss to finance his debut feature. The film was an unconventional take on a modern love story, and featured a teenage girl from Long Island falling in love with an older criminal. Despite its rather taboo subject matter, "The Unbelievable Truth" was a critical hit when it premiered in 1989, and went on to be nominated for the 1990 Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

The critical success of the film allowed Hartley to focus entirely on filmmaking, and over the next five years he shot several equally lauded independent dramas, including "Trust," "Amateur," and "Flirt," all of which featured the director's signature offbeat dialogue and philosophical ramblings. In 1997 Hartley released his biggest hit to date, "Henry Fool." The film, about a trash collector who rises to become a literary celebrity, earned Hartley the Best Screenplay award at the 1998 Cannes Film Festival, and spawned a 2006 sequel, "Fay Grim." Hartley's continued directing in 2000s, although his films took on a more satirical tone: both "No Such Thing" and "The Girl From Monday" (2005) tackled themes of celebrity-driven culture and media manipulation in the 21st century. In 2011 Hartley directed "Meanwhile," his first film to be funded in part by the crowd-sourcing website Kickstarter. "Meanwhile" told the story of a man having to traverse around the streets of New York in order retrieve his house keys from a friend. Hartley began a Kickstarter campaign to see the film through its completion and eventual DVD release, which occurred in 2012.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Ned Rifle (2015)
2.
  Fay Grim (2006)
3.
  Girl From Monday, The (2005) Director
4.
  No Such Thing (2002) Director
5.
  Kimono (2000) Director
6.
  New Math(s), The (2000) Director
7.
  Book of Life, The (1998) Director
8.
  Henry Fool (1997) Director
9.
  Flirt (1995) Director
10.
  NYC 3/94 (1994) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Divine Trash (1998)
2.
 Flirt (1995) Hal--Miho'S Boyfriend (Tokyo)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1985:
Completed his student thesis film, "Kid"
2007:
Helmed "Fay Grim," a sequel to his 1997 film "Henry Fool" starring Parker Posey as a single mom thrown into a world of international espionage
2005:
Helmed the feature "The Girl From Monday" about a time in the near future when citizens are happy to be property traded on the stock exchange
:
Left art school in Boston; made eight super-8 films before enrolling in the film department at SUNY, Purchase
:
Raised in Lindenhurst, Long Island, NY
1991:
Short films, the 10-minute "Ambition" and the 17-minute "Theory of Achievement", broadcast on PBS' "Alive From Off Center"
1994:
Wrote and directed "Amateur"
1992:
"Surviving Desire", his first work made expressly for TV, broadcast on "American Playhouse" on PBS
1995:
Helmed the tripartite "Flirt", which incorporated the 1993 short of the same name
1989:
Made feature directing, screenwriting, producing and editing debut with "The Unbelievable Truth"
1999:
Made the short "The Book of Life"
2001:
Debut as playwright with "Soon", produced in Los Angeles
1993:
Made short film "Flirt"; later incorporated into the 1995 feature of the same title
2002:
Wrote and directed "No Such Thing", an adaptation of "Beauty and the Beast"
:
After his mother's death, went to live with various relatives
:
Began freelancing on commercials and feature films
2000:
Directed and wrote and the short "Kimono"
1997:
Garnered critical acclaim for "Henry Fool"; screened at Cannes where it won the screenplay award
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Lindenhurst High School: Lindenhurst, New York - 1977
Massachusetts College of Art: - 1978
State University of New York at Purchase Film School: New York - 1980

Notes

Hartley has used the pseudonym of Ned Rifle when he composes the scores for his films. Ned Rifle was the name of the hero of his first film "Kid".

"I start the whole creative process with a lot of questions and I usually just wind up with a lot of questions. The questioning is important." --Hal Hartley (THE NEW YORK TIMES, September 6, 1991)

"The small circle of truly significant American film makers . . . may be gearing up to admit some new members. One candidate is Gus Van Sant. . . . Another is Hal Hartley. . . . Hartley taps into a universe ignored by a Hollywood obsessed with precocious juveniles and expensive extravaganzas. His loners and outsiders are passionate about the idea of love and desire and survival, even while knowing they might very well end up looking ridiculous." --John J. O'Connor (NEW YORK TIMES, January 22, 1992)

"Love stories aren't about boys and girls, they are about pain and struggle and fear." --Hartley in THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, August 4, 1996

"I have found that all incompetence comes from not paying attention, which comes from people doing something that they don't want to do. And doing what you don't want to do means either you have no choice, or you don't think that the moments of your life are worth fighting for." --to THE NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, August 4, 1996

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Miho Nikaido. Actor. Japanese; Hartley cast her in "Flirt".

Family close complete family listing

father:
Hal Hartley Sr. Retired ironworker.
brother:
Pat Hartley.
cousin:
Bob Gosse. Producer.

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