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Dolores Hart

Dolores Hart

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Also Known As: Dolores Hicks Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Though she shared the screen with such stars as Elvis Presley, Montgomery Clift and Anna Magnani in the course of her brief acting career, Dolores Hart received more notice in Hollywood history books for her decision to abandon stardom for life as a nun in 1963. A pert, intelligent and confident performer, Hart proved equally capable at both high drama like "Wild is the Wind" (1957) and lightweight fare like "Loving You" (1957), the first of two films opposite Presley, and "Where the Boys Are" (1960). A retreat to the Benedictine Abbey of Regina Laudis in 1959 left Hart feeling a void in her life that could not be filled by acting, and in 1963, she left Hollywood to take her vows as a nun. For the next four decades, Hart led the monastic life of a Benedictine nun, returning occasionally to the spotlight to recall her religious calling, most notably for a 2012 documentary short, "God is the Bigger Elvis," which received an Oscar nomination. Though her film career was an admirable footnote in her life, Hart's dedication to her religious order was proof positive that some things held greater resonance than Hollywood stardom.

Though she shared the screen with such stars as Elvis Presley, Montgomery Clift and Anna Magnani in the course of her brief acting career, Dolores Hart received more notice in Hollywood history books for her decision to abandon stardom for life as a nun in 1963. A pert, intelligent and confident performer, Hart proved equally capable at both high drama like "Wild is the Wind" (1957) and lightweight fare like "Loving You" (1957), the first of two films opposite Presley, and "Where the Boys Are" (1960). A retreat to the Benedictine Abbey of Regina Laudis in 1959 left Hart feeling a void in her life that could not be filled by acting, and in 1963, she left Hollywood to take her vows as a nun. For the next four decades, Hart led the monastic life of a Benedictine nun, returning occasionally to the spotlight to recall her religious calling, most notably for a 2012 documentary short, "God is the Bigger Elvis," which received an Oscar nomination. Though her film career was an admirable footnote in her life, Hart's dedication to her religious order was proof positive that some things held greater resonance than Hollywood stardom.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Come Fly with Me (1963) Donna Stuart
2.
 Sail a Crooked Ship (1962) Elinor Harrison
3.
 Lisa (1962) Lisa Held
4.
 Francis of Assisi (1961) Clare Scefi
5.
 Where the Boys Are (1960) Merritt Andrews
6.
 The Plunderers (1960) Ellie Walters
7.
 Lonelyhearts (1958) Justy Sargeant
8.
 King Creole (1958) Nellie
9.
 Wild Is the Wind (1958) Angie
10.
 Loving You (1957) Susan Jessup
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Don Robinson. Were engaged in 1962; remained friends after separating.

Contributions

alenux ( 2011-02-04 )

Source: not available

Dolores Hart was the daughter of a Hollywood actor. She grew up between Beverly Hills and Chicago, where she stayed with her grandparents and went to school in the winter months. When her parents split up and her mothter remarried, she went back to live in California, only twenty minutes away from MGM and Paramount Studios. She dreamed of becoming an actress from the age of 7. At Marymount College she played Joan of Arc, and a talent scout noticed her. Famed producer Hal Wallis signed her up and she made movies with famous actors like Elvis Presley, Montgomery Cliff and Robert Wagner. In 1963, at the age of 25, already engaged to be married, she realized her true vocation was for a religious life. She entered a benedictine convent in 1963 and has lived there ever since.

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