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Rex Harrison

Rex Harrison

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Also Known As: Died: June 2, 1990
Born: March 5, 1908 Cause of Death: pancreatic cancer
Birth Place: Lancashire, England, GB Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1924:
Was member of Liverpool Repertory Theatre
1930:
London stage debut as Honorable Fred Thripplehorn in "Getting George Married"
1930:
Film debut, "The Great Game"
1936:
Broadway debut as Tubbs Barrow in "Sweet Aloes"
:
Became stage star in Terrence Rattigan's "French Without Tears"
1938:
Had supporting part in King Vidor's "The Citadel", based on the A J Cronin novel
1939:
Acted onstage in S N Behrman's "No Time for Comedy" and Noel Coward's "Design for Living"
1940:
Starred in Carol Reed's "Night Train to Munich"
1941:
Offered brilliant turn opposite Wendy Hiller in Gabriel Pascal's "Major Barbara"
:
Served in Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
1945:
Portrayed Charles Condimine in David Lean's film version of Coward's "Blithe Spirit"
1946:
Signed by 20th Century-Fox to seven year contract
1946:
Scored major triumph as the 19th Century Siamese King Mongkut in his Hollywood debut, "Anna and the King of Siam"; years later Rodgers and Hammerstein would offer him the role of the King in their musical version of the tale, but other commitments prevented him from accepting
1947:
Followed with another film success, "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir", opposite Gene Tierney
1948:
Starred as a music conductor who plots to kill his adulterous wife in Preston Sturges' comedy "Unfaithfully Yours"
1948:
Returned to Broadway as Henry VIII in Maxwell Anderson's "Anne of the Thousand Days"; earned first Tony Award
1950:
Received acclaim for his performances in T S Eliot's "The Cocktail Party" in London and in John van Druten's "Bell, Book and Candle" on both sides of the Atlantic
1953:
Directed and appeared as the Man in Broadway production of "The Love of Four Colonels"
1956:
"My Fair Lady" opened on Broadway with Harrison as Professor Henry Higgins and Julie Andrews as Eliza Doolittle; received TOny Award for Best Actor in a Musical
1958:
After two years on Broadway, reprised "My Fair Lady" in London
1960:
Played Doris Day's husband in "Midnight Lace"
1963:
Earned first Best Actor Academy Award nomination for his portrayal of Julius Caesar in "Cleopatra", stealing the film from his more famous co-stars Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton
1964:
Acted in "The Yellow Rolls-Royce"; screenplay by Rattigan
1964:
Reprised Higgins for film version of "My Fair Lady" opposite Audrey Hepburn; won Best Actor Oscar
1965:
Reteamed with director Carol Reed to play Pope Julius II in "The Agony and the Ecstacy"
1967:
Portrayed title role in "Doctor Dolittle"
1974:
Played title role in Luigi Pirandello's "Henry IV" on London stage and Sebastian Crutwell in Rattigan's "In Praise of Love" on Broadway
1977:
Appeared as Caesar in Broadway production of "Caesar and Cleopatra"
1978:
Returned to drawing-room comedy for Broadway production of "The Kingfisher", opposite Claudette Colbert
1979:
Filmed last feature, "A Time to Die" (released in 1983)
1981:
Reprised "My Fair Lady" on Broadway
1983:
Received much critical acclaim for his portrayal of the aging Captain Shotover in Broadway revival of Shaw's "Heartbreak House"; Walter Kerr of THE NEW YORK TIMES called it "the best work the actor has ever done"; filmed for Showtime in 1985
:
Played Lord Grenham in "Aren't We All?", first in London and then on Broadway; again teamed opposite Claudette Colbert
1986:
Portrayed Grand Duke Cyril Romanov in NBC miniseries, "Anastasia: The Story of Anna"
1988:
Last appearance on the London stage, "The Admirable Crichton"
:
Performed the part of Lord Porteus in W Somerset Maugham's 1920s comedy "The Circle" on Broadway up unitl three weeks prior to his death

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