skip navigation
William Hanna

William Hanna

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (1)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Jetsons: The... The Jetsons hit the big screen in this 1990 animated comedy! George finally gets... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Tom And... The world's favorite perpetual game of cat and mouse continues in "Tom and... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Scooby-Doo,... There's no mystery too big to solve when Scooby-Doo and his crew are on the job.... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Scooby-Doo,... Join the whole Mystery Inc gang, Fred, Daphne, Velma, Shaggy and Scooby himself... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Scooby-Doo,... The Mystery Van gang is back for more spooky adventure! Fred, Daphne, Velma,... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Scooby Doo... The Great Dane detective and Mystery Inc. are back for more adventures from the... more info $44.98was $44.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Died: March 22, 2001
Born: July 14, 1910 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Melrose, New Mexico, USA Profession: Director ...
RATE AND COMMENT

MILESTONES

:
As the son of a construction superintendent for the early Santa Fe railroad stations, moved with family from train stop to train stop
1913:
By age three, lived in Baker, OR where his father was assigned to build a dam
:
Began attending school in Logan, UT
1917:
At age seven, moved with family to San Pedro, CA
1919:
Moved to Los Angeles
1922:
At age 12, began a lifelong association with the Boy Scouts of America (date approximate)
:
Began taking lessons on the alto saxophone; performed with a group of local children (subsequently studied piano, composition and harmony)
1929:
Left college to look for work after the economic collapse (date approximate)
:
Took a job with the engineers building the Pantages Theater on Hollywood Boulevard
:
Referred to a newly formed animation company, Harman-Ising Studios, by his brother-in-law Jack Stevens (himself an employee of Leon Schlesinger's Pacific Title, an art studio that crafted titles and artwork for film companies)
1930:
Hired as a cel-washer by Harman-Ising studios, then working with producer Schlesinger on the Looney Tunes cartoon series for Warner Bros.; worked with future animation director Friz Freleng
:
Developed story material for "Bosko" cartoons while washing paint off animation cells
:
Painted cels and punched animation paper
:
Ran inking and painting department during the day; worked with Ising on story material at night
1933:
Continued to work for Harman-Ising when they severed ties with Schlesinger and left Warner Bros. over budget disputes; Harman-Ising contracted to produce cartoons for MGM
:
Joined the writing staff; wrote lyrics and music as needed; with artist Paul Fennell, formed a unit to produce cartoon musicals
1934:
Began directing cartoon shorts for Harman-Ising
1937:
Hired by MGM as a director and story editor when the studio began its own animation unit under the supervision of Fred Quimby; Joe Barbera hired initially as an animator but soon became a storyman
1938:
First meeting with Barbera
1940:
First collaboration with Barbera "Puss Gets the Boot"; first Tom and Jerry cartoon (though Tom Cat is initially named Jasper); neither Hanna nor Barbera received screen credit; sole producing credit went to Rudolf Ising; nominated for a 1940 Oscar
:
Wrote and directed only "Tom and Jerry" cartoons for 17 years; the series won an unprecedented seven Academy Awards between 1943 and 1952; unit head Fred Quimby took home the statuettes
1945:
Major supporting character Spike the Dog introduced in "Quiet, Please"
1945:
With Barbera, assigned to direct a live-action/animated sequence in which Jerry the mouse dances with sailor Gene Kelly in the musical feature "Anchors Aweigh"
1946:
With Barbera, directed the animated opening credits for the musical "Holiday in Mexico"
1953:
With Barbera, animated a sequence for the musical "Dangerous When Wet" in which Tom and Jerry dance with Esther Williams
1953:
Animated the lengthy "Sinbad the Sailor" segment of Gene Kelly's multi-part dance film "Invitation to the Dance" in which Kelly danced in an elaborate cartoon environment (shelved until 1956)
1955:
With Barbera, named production heads of the MGM animation department after Fred Quimby retired due to health reasons; picked up first Oscar nomination (along with Quimby and Barbera) for "Good Will to Men"
1957:
MGM, hurt badly by the growing competition form TV, eliminated the studio's entire animation department
1957:
Co-founded production company Hanna-Barbera (with Barbera)
1957:
Contracted with NBC-TV to create a six-minute cartoon on a budget of $2,800 (as compared to the minimum budget of $50,000 alloted by MGM for a theatrical cartoon short of the same length)
:
Premiered their first animated TV series, "Ruff and Reddy" (NBC), starring a quick-thinking cat (Ruff) and a dimwitted dog (Reddy) in six-minute "bookends" for vintage cartoons
1958:
Produced (with Barbera) "The Huckleberry Hound Show" (syndicated), TV's first all-animation TV show; introduced the character of Yogi Bear who would star in his own series, "The Yogi Bear Show", beginning in 1961
1959:
With Barbera, produced and directed "The Quick Draw McGraw Show", a syndicated cartoon series
1960:
"The Huckleberry Hound Show" became Hanna-Barbera's first Emmy-winner (Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Children's Programming); the first cartoon to win an Emmy
:
With Barbera, produced and directed the hugely successful ABC cartoon sitcom, "The Flintstones", the longest running animated series in primetime until Fox's "The Simpsons" broke its record
:
In tandem with Barbera, produced and directed "Top Cat", an ABC primetime series; although Top Cat's primetime stay was short, he would later star as the treasure master in "Yogi's Treasure Hunt" of "The Futuristic World of Hanna-Barbera"
:
Produced and directed (both with Barbera) the sci-fi-flavored ABC cartoon sitcom "The Jetsons"; only 24 episodes produced originally; 41 additional episodes produced in 1985 to make the series more viable in the syndication market
1964:
Feature producing and directing debut (both with Barbera), "Hey There, It's Yogi Bear", a theatrical feature spin-off of the TV series; also feature screenwriting debut (with Barbera and Warren Foster)
1964:
Produced and directed (both with Barbera) "The Man Called Flintstone", a theatrical feature spin-off of the TV series
:
With Barbera, executive produced and directed "The Adventures of Jonny Quest", their first successful animated adventure series and the last to be created for primetime; reputedly the first animated show to use realistic human figures; after a season in primetime, the show subsequently played on Saturday mornings on each of the networks; new episodes produced in 1986 for inclusion in the expanded syndicated Sunday morning series "The Funtastic World of Hanna-Barbera"
:
Revived (and revised) the popular characters Tom & Jerry for CBS's "Tom and Jerry Show"
1967:
With Barbera, sold studio to Taft Broadcasting
:
Executive produced and directed (both with Barbera) "Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?" (ABC), a cartoon comedy mystery series which remained in continuous production--under various titles--for 17 years (end date approximate)
1972:
Produced (with Barbera) "Wait Til Your Father Gets Home", a syndicated "adult" cartoon series dealing with similar issues as those on "All in the Family"
1972:
Executive produced (with Barbera) the studio's first live-action TV-movie "Hardcase" (ABC), a Western
1973:
With Barbera, produced "Charlotte's Web", a feature musical based on E B White's classic book; earned the studio an Annie Award
1976:
Earned star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame; honored with Joseph Barbera
1977:
Hanna-Barbera Productions produced the acclaimed CBS live-action TV-movie, "The Gathering", a 1978 Emmy winner for Outstanding Special (Drama or Comedy); Barbera listed as executive producer (Hanna did not not take an individual credit); generated a sequel "The Gathering, Part II" (NBC, 1979)
1978:
Hanna-Barbera produced its first live-action feature film, "C.H.O.M.P.S.", starring Valerie Bertinelli
1978:
"The Hanna-Barbera Happy Hour", a short-lived live-action comedy variety series (with high-tech puppet hosts) aired on NBC in primetime
1980:
Various entertainment subsidiaries of Taft Broadcasting reorganized into the Taft Entertainment Company with Hanna-Barbera as a division; Hanna served as senior vice president (and Barbera as president) of Hanna-Barbera Productions
:
Executive produced (with Barbera) "The Smurfs", a hugely successful cartoon series based on the Belgian comic strip by Peyo Culliford (end date approximate)
1982:
Produced (with Barbera) "Heidi's Song", an animated feature
1988:
Taft Broadcasting, Hanna-Barbera's parent company, sold to the Great American Broadcasting Company; did not affect day-to-day operation of studio
1990:
Directed and produced (both with Barbera) "Jetsons: The Movie"
1993:
Provided his voice for ABC movie "I Yabba Dabba Do!"; also directed (solo) and produced (with Barbera)
1994:
Inducted into the TV Hall of Fame by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
1994:
Executive produced (with Barbera and three others) "The Flintstones" feature film
:
TNT, TBS and the Cartoon Network aired "The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest"

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute