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Also Known As: Thomas Jeffrey Hanks Died:
Born: July 9, 1956 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Concord, California, USA Profession: actor, producer, screenwriter, director, songwriter, sold peanuts at Oakland Coliseum, hotel bellboy

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

as panned by most critics for failing to live up to expectations.After providing voice cameos for "Cars" (2006) and "The Simpsons Movie" (2007), he helped narrate "The War" (PBS, 2007-08), Ken Burns' stunning and comprehensive look at ordinary Americans fighting in World War II. Hanks then starred in the critically-acclaimed political satire, "Charlie Wilson's War" (2007), adapted by Aaron Sorkin from George Crile's non-fiction novel. Hanks played "Good Time Charlie" Wilson, a U.S. congressman with a taste for hookers and blow whose deep patriotism and frustration with American foreign policy leads him to team up with the wealthiest woman in Texas (Julia Roberts) and a blue-collar CIA operative (Philip Seymour Hoffman) to fund the Mujahideen fighters after the Soviets invade Afghanistan. Once again, Hanks found himself being showered with praise for another strong performance, earning a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actor in a Musical or Comedy as well as the requisite Oscar buzz. Turning back to the role of producer, he helped bring to life the exquisite and much-acclaimed seven-part miniseries, "John Adams" (HBO, 2008), which starred Paul Giamatti as the American Revolutionary...

as panned by most critics for failing to live up to expectations.

After providing voice cameos for "Cars" (2006) and "The Simpsons Movie" (2007), he helped narrate "The War" (PBS, 2007-08), Ken Burns' stunning and comprehensive look at ordinary Americans fighting in World War II. Hanks then starred in the critically-acclaimed political satire, "Charlie Wilson's War" (2007), adapted by Aaron Sorkin from George Crile's non-fiction novel. Hanks played "Good Time Charlie" Wilson, a U.S. congressman with a taste for hookers and blow whose deep patriotism and frustration with American foreign policy leads him to team up with the wealthiest woman in Texas (Julia Roberts) and a blue-collar CIA operative (Philip Seymour Hoffman) to fund the Mujahideen fighters after the Soviets invade Afghanistan. Once again, Hanks found himself being showered with praise for another strong performance, earning a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actor in a Musical or Comedy as well as the requisite Oscar buzz. Turning back to the role of producer, he helped bring to life the exquisite and much-acclaimed seven-part miniseries, "John Adams" (HBO, 2008), which starred Paul Giamatti as the American Revolutionary leader and second President of the United States. The epic series won just about every major award possible, including 13 Emmys, four Golden Globes and the Humanitas Prize.

In 2009, Hanks won the Producers Guild of America Award for Producer of the Year - Longform Television. After executive producing the film adaptation of the West End musical "Mama Mia!" (2008) with his wife, Hanks co-starred with son Colin Hanks in "The Great Buck Howard" (2009), a comedy about a young aspiring magician who becomes an assistant to a renowned illusionist against his father's wishes. Meanwhile, he reprised the role of Professor Robert Langdon for the successful adaptation of Dan Brown's "Angels & Demons" (2009), after which he went back to producing with director Spike Jonze's take on "Where the Wild Things Are" (2009). Returning to his fascination for World War II, Hanks rejoined "Band of Brothers" cohort Steven Spielberg for "The Pacific" (HBO, 2010), a true-to-life fictionalization of the war between Japan and the U.S. in the Pacific theater, as told though the intertwining stories of three U.S. Marines (Joseph Mazzello, James Badge Dale and Jon Seda) who fight their way through the blood-soaked beaches of Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. After reprising Woody for "Toy Story 3" (2010) ¿ widely considered to be the best of the series ¿ and starring opposite Julia Roberts in the poorly received romantic comedy "Larry Crowne" (2011), which he directed, Hanks appeared as a father whose son tried to unlock his secrets following his death on 9/11 in the acclaimed drama "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close" (2011). Slipping back into producing mode, Hanks was executive producer on "Game Change" (HBO, 2012), an inside look at the 2008 presidential campaign as seen through the eyes of campaign manager Steve Schmidt (Woody Harrelson), who was at least in part responsible for picking Alaskan governor Sarah Palin (Julianne Moore) as the vice presidential running mate of John McCain (Ed Harris). The series won Emmys for Moore, director Jay Roach and Outstanding Miniseries or Movie, for which Hanks delivered a typically effusive acceptance speech.

Later in 2012, Hanks unveiled a web series that he produced and created, the animated sci-fi show "Electric City," which also featured him as a voice actor. That fall he starred with Halle Berry and an impressive ensemble cast in "Cloud Atlas," an expansive time-hopping literary adaptation that found him playing six different roles. Continuing to voice Woody in a variety of "Toy Story" shorts, including the TV special "Toy Story of Terror" (ABC, 2013), Hanks won accolades for his turn as a real-life merchant mariner under siege at sea in the tense Paul Greengrass drama "Captain Phillips" (2013) and as Walt Disney in "Saving Mr. Banks" (2013), a tale of the making of "Mary Poppins" (1964).

ing in Georgia in 1942 through their participation in the invasion of Normandy. Hanks additionally directed one episode of the miniseries, for which he earned an Emmy for Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special. The actor then took on an atypical role, portraying a 1920s Chicago gangster seeking revenge for the death of family members in "The Road to Perdition" (2002). Though Sam Mendes' film prompted mixed critical responses, Hanks' efforts were roundly praised, even if his inherent likeability served to undermine the professional killer he played.

His next film, "Catch Me If You Can" (2002), reunited him with Spielberg who cast him as Carl Hanratty, a real-life FBI fraud investigator hot on the trail of the youngest con artist ever to make the Most Wanted list, Frank Abagnale, Jr. (Leonardo DiCaprio). Equal parts downtrodden and dogged, Hanratty was one of Hanks' most distinctive onscreen creations and stood in perfect contrast to DiCaprio's glamorous, happy-go-lucky Abagnale. In fact, Hanks' likeability served his underdog character well, allowing him to convincingly convey Hanratty's more unlikable aspects. Meanwhile, Hanks the movie producer scored mega-success with the unexpectedly popular comedy "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" (2002), which Hanks' part-Greek wife Rita Wilson had discovered when it was a one-woman show created by Nia Vardalos. Hanks' next trick was a return to his wacky comedic roots ¿ indeed, even quirkier territory than he had plumbed before ¿ in the Coen Brothers' remake of the cult classic British film, "The Ladykillers" (2004). Hanks played the verbose, guffawing Professor Dorr, a criminal mastermind whose plan for the Heist of the Century is stymied by a stubborn old woman (Irma P. Hall).

The actor reunited with Spielberg yet again for "The Terminal" (2004), playing an Eastern European immigrant Viktor Navorski, who becomes stranded in a New York City airport terminal because of a quirk in international politics and passport law. He subsequently takes up residence and becomes involved with many of the terminal's temporary inhabitants, including a beautiful flight attendant (Catherine Zeta-Jones). Despite a strong performance and smart direction, "The Terminal" ultimately suffered from an obvious sentimental ending. Hanks teamed up again with Robert Zemeckis to appear as multiple characters in the ambitious CGI-animated adaptation of the popular children's story, "The Polar Express" (2004). Using groundbreaking performance capture technology to digitally morph his physical performances, Hanks was projected onscreen in various forms, playing The Conductor, Hero Boy, Santa Claus, the Hobo and the Boy's Father, which were subsequently woven seamlessly into the film's computer generated environments.

Hanks returned to his love of outer space to narrate the short IMAX film, "Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D" (2005), a stunning journey into mankind's most incredible adventure. The film showcased past, present and future space explorations, as audiences experienced the moon's surface as if they were Apollo astronauts. Returning to dramatic fare, he starred in "The Da Vinci Code" (2006), the long-anticipated adaptation of Dan Brown's monumental bestseller about a murder at the Louvre investigated by a famed symbologist, who unravels a sinister plot to keep a secret that has been protected since the time of Christ. While the script was kept a secret during filming as the fictional mystery in the story, the controversial nature of the book had kept filmmakers from shooting at key locations, including Westminster Abbey. Meanwhile, religious groups, already in a tizzy over the book, braced themselves for what was almost assured to be a blockbuster movie. Though on paper a huge success, taking in $200 million in domestic box office, "The Da Vinci Code" w

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.
  That Thing You Do! (1996) Director
3.

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Circle, The (2017)
2.
 Inferno (2016)
3.
 Sully (2016)
4.
5.
 Bridge of Spies (2015)
6.
 Ithaca (2015)
8.
 Killing Lincoln (2013)
9.
 Captain Phillips (2013)
10.
 Saving Mr. Banks (2013)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Spent three seasons performing with the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Ohio working with Vincent Dowling
1978:
Made professional debut as Grumio in "The Taming of the Shrew" at the Riverside Theater in Cleveland, OH
1980:
Made film acting debut, "He Knows You're Alone"; reportedly paid only $800
1982:
Made first TV-movie, Rona Jaffe's "Mazes and Monsters" (CBS)
1982:
Made guest appearance on ABC's "Happy Days"; first met Ron Howard
1983:
Landed recurring role as Uncle Ned on the NBC sitcom "Family Ties"
1986:
Offered a change of pace performance as a workaholic advertising executive who tries to reconcile with his ill father (Jackie Gleason) in "Nothing in Common"
1990:
Starred as Sherman McCoy in Brian De Palma's ill-fated screen version of "The Bonfire of the Vanities"
1990:
Had first screen pairing with Meg Ryan (who had multiple roles) in the comedy "Joe Versus the Volcano"
1992:
Made TV directorial debut, "None But the Lonely Heart" episode of HBO's "Tales From the Crypt" series
1993:
With Gary Goetzman, formed the production company Clavius Base
1993:
Directed and acted in "I'll Be Waiting," a segment of the Showtime series "Fallen Angels"
1998:
Co-executive produced the 13-part HBO series "From the Earth to the Moon" about the NASA space program; also acted in, scripted and directed episodes; co-produced with Ron Howard, Brian Grazer and others
1999:
Starred as a prison guard in the period drama "The Green Mile," adapted from Stephen King's novel
1999:
Reprised voice of Woody in "Toy Story 2"; originally planned as a direct-to-video release, film received a theatrical distribution
2001:
With Spielberg, produced the HBO WWII-themed miniseries "Band of Brothers"; also scripted and directed episodes
2002:
Co-starred with Paul Newman in "The Road to Perdition"
2002:
Collaborated again with director Spielberg for "Catch Me if You Can," playing the FBI agent pursuing Leonardo DiCaprio
2004:
Starred as a southern professor who puts together a group of thieves to rob a casino in the remake of "The Ladykillers"; helmed by Joel and Ethan Coen
2004:
Starred in the romantic comedy "The Terminal" as Viktor Navorski, an immigrant who becomes a resident of a New York airport terminal; directed by Steven Spielberg and co-starred Catherine Zeta-Jones
2004:
Cast as the voice of The Conductor/Hero Boy in the animated film "Polar Express," directed and screenplay by Robert Zemeckis
2006:
Re-teamed with director Ron Howard to portray professor Robert Langdon in the film adaptation of "The Da Vinci Code," based on Dan Brown's controversial bestseller
2007:
Portrayed the titular Democratic Texas congressman "Charlie Wilson's War," directed by Mike Nichols, written by Aaron Sorkin, and co-starring Julia Roberts; earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
2008:
Executive produced the HBO original movie "John Adams"
2008:
Executive produced (with wife Rita Wilson) the film adaptation of the West End stage musical "Mamma Mia!"
2008:
Co-starred with son Colin in "The Great Buck Howard," a comedy about a young aspiring magician (Colin) who becomes the assistant to a renowned illusionist against his father's wishes
2009:
Re-teamed with Howard to play professor Robert Langdon in "Angels & Demons," the film adaptation of Dan Brown's novel and sequel to "The Da Vinci Code"
2009:
Produced the live-action adaptation of Maurice Sendak's children's book <i>Where the Wild Things Are</i>, directed by Spike Jonze
2010:
Re-teamed with Steven Spielberg to executive produce HBO's 10-part miniseries "The Pacific," which earned an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Miniseries
2010:
Reprised voice of Woody in the animated feature "Toy Story 3"
2011:
Co-wrote, directed and starred in "Larry Crowne"
2011:
Co-starred with Sandra Bullock and newcomer Thomas Horn in 9/11 drama "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," based on Jonathan Safran Foer's 2005 novel
2012:
Announced to make Broadway debut in "Lucky Guy," a play written by the late Nora Ephron
2012:
Played multiple roles in "Cloud Atlas," based on David Mitchell's 2004 novel; film co-directed by Andy Wachowski, Lana Wachowski, and Tom Tykwer
2013:
Reprised Woody in the TV special "Toy Story of Terror"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Chabot Junior College: Hayward , California -
Skyline High School: Oakland , California - 1974
California State University, Sacramento: Sacramento , California - 1976 - 1977

Notes

"I think that for the most part I'm a somewhat shy and retiring guy. I don't wear an awful lot of my emotions on my sleeve and I don't have any overriding passions that force me into other people's lives, so I probably pull back when anybody tries to do that to me. I think part of it might be because when I was growing up, we moved around an awful lot, so we didn't have an awful lot of friends around us that we really knew well. We were always taking off. I don't think it's part of my mental makeup to completely open myself up to people I know."---Hanks quoted in Newsweek, September 26, 1988.

"I'm a lot more picky than I used to be about roles. When you first start off, you think that you're never going to get another chance to do this, so if there's even a vague, vague interest you say, 'Yes, yes, I want to do this very badly.' Now I've come too close to repeating myself on a number of occasions and you don't want that to happen. So I have to have a real, instinctual, emotional bond, not just with the character but with the nature of the movie itself, before I'll say yes."---Tom Hanks quoted in Chicago Tribune, March 4, 1990.

"I'm not threatening at all to anyone. So maybe that makes me the most beautiful, perfect casting for this because no one has any reason to fear or loathe me."---Hanks on being cast in "Philadelphia" as a gay man with AIDS, told Esquire, December 1993.

"I think he's probably a more complex person than people realize."---co-star Meg Ryan quoted in Us, August 1994.

"Oh, there's any number of people out there who will tell you I'm not a very nice man. I can be hard on some people. I'm not going to have anybody take advantage of me because I'm a nice guy. [Movie-making] can be very volatile. Look, I'm not a perfect human being. I try to be very respectful to everybody. But there's been times when I have flown off the handle and not lived up to my image as the nicest guy in show business."---Hanks quoted in Us, August 1994.

"The man is as nice, as honest, as professional, as personal as he seems to be. His life is not an act. He's an extremely talented actor, and as a human being he is what we all should aspire to be."---Steve Tisch, producer of "Forrest Gump", quoted in Entertainment Weekly's 1995 Special Academy Awards issue.

"Look, 'Forrest Gump' was great, it was fabulous. It lasted much longer than anybody thought and brought me a degree of attention that no human being on the face of the planet deserves. But, thank goodness, that's over now."---Tom Hanks quoted in Newsday, June 25, 1995.

"... compared to being a director, acting is a vacation ..."---Hanks to Los Angeles Times, September 29, 1996.

"Look, I've done a lot of movies, and I've done a lot of press for these movies, so the natural order of things is, 'Here's what you get from this guy.' That's how I've been defined, which is not completely accurate nor is it totally fair. Rather than adhere to any sort of image that will protect that, what's more important is to try to surprise people. I could go off and play some psychotic killer, but that would be the more crass way of doing things."---Hanks replying to The New York Times contention that he selects his roles so as not to sully his good-guy image, quoted in Los Angeles Times, April 5, 1998.

"You don't direct him. You just sit there getting lucky."---Nora Ephron on working with Hanks, quoted in Biography Magazine, July 1998.

"Being a media darling is a fate I do not wish on my worst enemy. I just don't have the kind of life that lends itself to that ... By and large, I'm just not dazzling enough to be a constant source of blind items."---Hanks quoted in Daily News, July 9, 1998.

Jonathan Alter: "What's the difference between being a 'star' and being an actor?"

Tom Hanks: "You end up being some brand of commodity. I am a package. What do you read about me? I'm the 'nicest guy in Hollywood.' I 'never play bad guys.' I'm 'the new Jimmy Stewart.' That whole [star] thing is a trade-off. It's harder to be mysterious and be discovered. There are some bad guys I would have played, given the opportunity. Like Bill Macy [as the murderous husband] in 'Fargo'. An amazing performance, an amazing role. The problem is I'm always in search of logic in the storytelling. And the Bad guys always suffer from faulty logic."

--From USA Weekend, July 24-26, 1998.

"I've made 20 movies and five of them are pretty good."---Hanks quoted in Boston Herald, July 24, 1998.

"When you look at him, you wouldn't think this is one of the greatest actors of our generation. You'd think more 'Excuse me, what are today's specials?'"---Steve Martin on Hanks during his AFI Lifetime Achievement award presentation

"I don't have any desire to play a Bond villain or a serial killer, because, quite frankly, there's a ton of stuff like that out there. What's much more interesting to me is the rationale behind a character."---Hanks Eonline

"I think in the earlier days, acting is fun because the whole thing is like a big circus. Making movies is very glamorous; there's a lot of people around, there's a lot of attention, a lot of hoopla, you can go places that you've never been before. It's a blast [but] then you got to figure out that you're not here on vacation and that you actually have to do some work here at the same time. I have to say now, I think I'm in it for better reasons. I do the work that I think is absolutely fascinating. There's not nearly as much distraction for me now as there used to be."---Hanks quoted to CINEMA CONFIDENTIAL, December 23, 2002.

"I don't threaten any man's sense of virility, or any woman's sense of security or decorum."---Hanks on why he's one of the biggest box-office stars of all time to independent.co.uk, September 10, 2004.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Samantha Lewes. Actor, producer. Were college sweethearts; married in 1979; mother of Hanks's older two children; separated in 1985; divorced in 1987.
wife:
Rita Wilson. Actor. Born c. 1956; married 1988; mother of Hanks' second and third sons; met on the set of "Volunteers" (1985).

Family close complete family listing

father:
Amos Hanks. Cook; restaurant manager; later taught at a vocational school. Divorced Hanks' mother in 1960; had custody of Hanks and two older siblings; married two more times; died in 1992.
mother:
Janet Turner. Hospital worker. Divorced Hanks' father in 1960; retained custody of Jim Hanks; remarried several times.
sister:
Sandra Hanks. Writer. Born on July 31, 1951.
brother:
Larry Hanks. Professor. Born on January 26, 1953; teaches at University of Illinois.
brother:
Jim Hanks. Actor. Younger; born on June 15, 1961.
son:
Colin Hanks. Actor. Born in 1977; mother, Samantha Lewes (aka Susan Dillingham).
daughter:
Elizabeth Ann Hanks. Born on May 17, 1982; mother, Samantha Lewes (aka Susan Dillingham).
son:
Chester Marlon Hanks. Born on August 4, 1990; mother, Rita Wilson.
son:
Truman Theodore Hanks. Born on December 26, 1995; mother, Rita Wilson.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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