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Lasse Hallstr÷m

Lasse Hallstr÷m

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Also Known As: Lasse Hallstrom,Lars Sven Hallstrm Died:
Born: June 2, 1946 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Sweden Profession: Director ... director screenwriter producer director of photography editor
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BIOGRAPHY

A popular director of drama-tinged comedies, Lasse Hallström segued from Swedish television and directing virtually all of ABBA's music videos to forging a fairly successful Hollywood career without abandoning his European sensibilities. Hallström emerged onto the international scene with "My Life as a Dog" (1985), which earned him a pair of Oscar nominations while opening the doors to American audiences. He made his U.S. debut with the underwhelming family dramedy "Once Around" (1991) before hitting his stride with the critically acclaimed "What's Eating Gilbert Grape" (1993). After stumbling a bit with "Something to Talk About" (1995), Hallström entered his most fruitful phase with beautifully crafted adaptations of "The Cider House Rules" (1999) and "Chocolat" (2000), both of which put him back into Academy Award contention. From there, he stumbled again with the disappointing adaptation of E. Annie Proulx's "The Shipping News" (2001), before hitting bottom with "An Unfinished Life" (2005) and "Casanova" (2005). Following the appreciated, but little-seen docudrama "The Hoax" (2007), Hallström finally had the box office hit he was waiting for with the adaptation of Nicholas Sparks' "Dear John" (2010). Having demonstrated an impressive flair for adapting material and drawing award-worthy performances from his actors, Hallström was noted for crafting emotionally wrought films that were deftly devoid of sentimentality.

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