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Albert Hague

Albert Hague

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Also Known As: Albert Marcuse Died: November 12, 2001
Born: October 13, 1920 Cause of Death: cancer
Birth Place: Berlin, DE Profession: composer, actor, singer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Although he achieved late-in-life fame as the white bearded, bespectacled and eccentric Professor Shorofsky in both the film and TV series "Fame", Albert Hague had already achieved success as a composer for stage and screen. When one considers that he spoke no English when he arrived in the USA in 1939 as an emigre from Germany, his success is quite amazing. He was born Albert Marcuse in Berlin, the son of a psychiatrist and a chess champion, who was a musical prodigy. By the time his family had settled in America and he had been adopted by his stepfather, Hague was concentrating on a career as a classical pianist. He studied in Rome and earned a scholarship to the University of Cincinnati. During WWII, he served in the US Army's special services band. After the war, Hague settled in NYC but it was Cleveland that saw his first produced stage show, "Reluctant Lady", in 1948. (The leading lady Renee Orin was to become Mrs. Hague.) Later that year, he debuted on Broadway with incidental music for "The Madwoman of Chaillot" but it was several years before he enjoyed his first major success, the 1955 musical "Plain and Fancy" about the Amish, which yielded the lovely standard "Young and Foolish". Hague...

Although he achieved late-in-life fame as the white bearded, bespectacled and eccentric Professor Shorofsky in both the film and TV series "Fame", Albert Hague had already achieved success as a composer for stage and screen. When one considers that he spoke no English when he arrived in the USA in 1939 as an emigre from Germany, his success is quite amazing. He was born Albert Marcuse in Berlin, the son of a psychiatrist and a chess champion, who was a musical prodigy. By the time his family had settled in America and he had been adopted by his stepfather, Hague was concentrating on a career as a classical pianist. He studied in Rome and earned a scholarship to the University of Cincinnati. During WWII, he served in the US Army's special services band. After the war, Hague settled in NYC but it was Cleveland that saw his first produced stage show, "Reluctant Lady", in 1948. (The leading lady Renee Orin was to become Mrs. Hague.) Later that year, he debuted on Broadway with incidental music for "The Madwoman of Chaillot" but it was several years before he enjoyed his first major success, the 1955 musical "Plain and Fancy" about the Amish, which yielded the lovely standard "Young and Foolish". Hague had his biggest success with the Tony-winning murder mystery musical "Redhead" (1959). Following that, his stage career petered out, as shows like "The Fig Leaves Are Falling" (1969) and "Miss Moffatt" (1974) proved unsuccessful. Hague did have one other major achievement that is perhaps his best-known work: the score to the perennial holiday special "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (originally aired on CBS in 1966).

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Story of Us, The (1999) Doctor Siegler
2.
 Playing Dangerous 2 (1996) Professor Agranoff
3.
 Space Jam (1996) Psychiatrist
6.
 Passions (1984) Peters
7.
 Nightmares (1983) Mel Keefer ("Night Of The Rat")
8.
 Not Just Another Affair (1982) Professor Zakall
9.
 Fame (1980) Shorofsky
10.
 1988 Miss USA Pageant (1988) Judge
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1925:
Began studying piano (date approximate)
1937:
Left Germany from Rome
1939:
Moved with family to the USA; could not speak any English when he arrived
:
While in college in Cincinnati, began working as a saloon piano player
1942:
Served in the US military during WWII; was in the Special Services band
:
Settled in NYC after WWII
1948:
Composed first stage work, "Reluctant Lady", produced in Cincinnati
1948:
Broadway debut as composer with incidental music for "The Madwoman of Chaillot"
1951:
Scored the film "Coney Island U.S.A."
1953:
TV debut as composer "The Mercer Girls"
1955:
Breakthrough Broadway musical, "Plain and Fancy"
1959:
Had biggest Broadway success with "Redhead"; won Tony Award for Best Musical; lyrics written by Dorothy Fields
1964:
Composed the musical score for the ill-fated stage show "Cafe Crown"
1966:
Wrote the delightful musical score for the animated TV special "How the Grinch Stole Christmas"
1969:
Provided the musical score for "The Fig Leaves Are Falling"
1974:
Was the composer of the ill-fated stage musical "Miss Moffatt", starring Bette Davis
:
Began performing a cabaret act with his wife
1980:
Film acting debut as Professor Shorofsky in "Fame"
:
Reprised the role of Professor Shorofsky in the TV series "Fame" (NBC, 1982-1983, syndicated, 1983-1987)
1982:
TV-movie acting debut, "Not Just Another Affair" (CBS)
1986:
Played "Rip Van Winkle" for "Faerie Tale Theatre" (Showtime)
1996:
Appeared in "Space Jam"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Royal Conservatory of St Cecilia: - 1938
University of Cincinnati-College Conservatory of Music: Cincinnati , Ohio - 1942

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Renee Orin. Actor, singer, screenwriter. Met when she was cast a slead in his first produced show in 1948; died of lymphoma on August 26, 2000 at age 73.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Harry Marcuse. Psychiatrist. Died c. 1930.
mother:
Mimi Heller. Cooking school owner, chess player.
father:
Eliott B Hague. Eye surgeon. Adoptive father; lived in Cincinnati; offered to adopt Hague so he could attend the University of Cincinnati and legally remain in the USA.
daughter:
Janet Hague.
son:
Andrew Hague.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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