skip navigation
Gene Hackman

Gene Hackman

  • I Never Sang for My Father (1970) September 24 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Scarecrow (1973) November 21 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (6)



Also Known As: Died:
Born: January 30, 1930 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: San Bernardino, California, USA Profession: Cast ...
RATE AND COMMENT

MILESTONES

:
Family moved frequently in his early childhood
:
Settled in Danville, IL; raised by maternal grandmother
1946:
Joined the Marines at age 16 after quitting school
:
While serving in China, worked as a disc jockey for U.S. Armed Forces Radio
1950:
Broke both legs in a motorcycle accident
:
In the 1950s, worked throughout the Midwest as a radio announcer and in NYC at various jobs
:
Moved to California to attend the Pasadena Playhouse acting school; voted "Least Likely to Succeed" along with classmate Dustin Hoffman
1958:
Made stage debut opposite ZaSu Pitts in "The Curious Miss Caraway" at the Pasadena Playhouse
:
Asked to leave Playhouse school; returned to NYC
1958:
New York stage debut in "Chaparral"
1959:
TV acting debut on the episode "Little Tin God" of CBS' "U.S. Steel Hour"; later appeared on several other installments of the show
1961:
Feature film acting debut, small role as a cop in "Mad Dog Coll"
1961:
Appeared with the improvisational troupe The Premise in Greenwich Village
1961:
Made impression with guest appearance on the debut episode of the CBS series "The Defenders"
1963:
Broadway debut, "Children at Their Games"
1964:
Rose to prominence in Broadway production of "Any Wednesday" opposite Sandy Dennis
1964:
First major film role, "Lilith"; also first screen collaboration with Warren Beatty
1967:
Hired by Beatty to play Buck Barrow in "Bonnie and Clyde"; received first Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor; also initial collaboration with Arthur Penn
1968:
TV-movie debut, "Shadow on the Land" (ABC)
1969:
Appeared as one of the astronauts trapped in space in "Marooned"
1970:
Earned second Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor for "I Never Sang for My Father"
1971:
Breakthrough screen role, NYC detective Popeye Doyle in "The French Connection"; reportedly almost quit film over its violent content; earned Best Actor Oscar
1972:
Headed the all-star cast of "The Poseidon Adventure" as a defrocked minister who becomes the de facto leader of those who survived the underwater disaster
1974:
Portrayed a specialist in planting bugging devices in Francis Ford Coppola's "The Conversation"
1974:
Offered hilarious cameo as the blind hermit in Mel Brooks' horror spoof "Young Frankenstein"
1975:
Reprised role of Popeye Doyle in "French Connection II"
1975:
Reteamed with director Arthur Penn for "Night Moves"
1977:
Appeared as part of the all-star cast of Richard Attenborough's WWII epic "A Bridge Too Far"
1977:
"Retired" from acting for four years
1978:
Offered deliciously sly turn as the villainous Lex Luthor in "Superman"; reprised role in 1980's "Superman II" (shot simultaneously with the first)
1981:
Returned to features after "retirement" in supporting role of editor Peter Van Wherry in Beatty's epic "Reds"
1981:
Had misfire as comic lead opposite Barbra Streisand in "All Night Long"
1983:
Delivered fine turn as a news anchorman in "Under Fire"
1985:
Played a middle-aged man going through a midlife crisis resulting in an affair in the underrated "Twice in a Lifetime"
1986:
Played the coach of a small-town Indiana high school basketball team in "Hoosiers"
1987:
Reprised role of Lex Luthor in the disappointing "Superman IV: The Quest for Peace"
1988:
Acted opposite Gena Rowlands in Woody Allen's "Another Woman"
1988:
Earned Best Actor Academy Award nomination as an FBI agent investigating the murders of civil rights workers in "Mississippi Burning"
1989:
Starred opposite Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio as father-daughter lawyers on opposite sides of a case in "Class Action"
1990:
Played a film director in Mike Nichols' "Postcards From the Edge," adapted from Carrie Fisher's roman-a-clef
1990:
Underwent surgery for angina, provoking a two-year hiatus from acting
1992:
Delivered fine villainous turn as a corrupt sheriff in Clint Eastwood's "Unforgiven"; received Best Supporting Actor Oscar
1992:
Returned to Broadway in "Death and the Maiden" alongside Richard Dreyfuss and Glenn Close
1993:
Portrayed a burnt-out lawyer in "The Firm," based on the John Grisham novel
1994:
Cast as the patriarch of the family in "Wyatt Earp"
1995:
Provided formidable opposition to Denzel Washington as the captain of a submarine in the taut thriller "Crimson Tide"
1995:
Showed comic side as a hack director in "Get Shorty"
1996:
Played the straight man as a conservative U.S .senator in "The Birdcage," directed by Mike Nichols
1996:
Second appearance in a film based on a John Grisham novel, "The Chamber"; played a white supremacist defended by his grandson (Chris O'Donnell)
1997:
Portrayed the U.S. President possibly caught up in murder in "Absolute Power"
1998:
Cast as a dignified movie star married to Susan Sarandon in "Twilight," also starring Paul Newman as a retired detective
1998:
Voiced the character of the fascistic General Mandible in the animated feature "Antz"
1998:
In a nod to "The Conversation," played a surveillance expert who assists Will Smith in "Enemy of the State"
1999:
Published first novel <i>Wake of the Perdido Star</i>, co-written with undersea archaeologist Daniel Lenihan; duo co-authored three more novels: <i>Justice for None</i> (2004), <i>Escape from Andersonville</i> (2008) and <i>Payback at Morning Peak</i> (2011)
2000:
Starred as a football coach in "The Replacements"
2000:
Executive produced and starred in the crime drama "Under Suspicion"
2001:
Appeared in "The Mexican" in an uncredited cameo
2001:
Landed featured role in "Heartbreakers," a comedy about a mother-daughter con artist team
2001:
Appeared opposite Owen Wilson in the war drama "Behind Enemy Lines"
2001:
Played the rascally patriarch of a dysfunctional family of geniuses in "The Royal Tenenbaums"; Owen Wilson co-wrote script with director Wes Anderson
2003:
Played a ruthless jury consultant in the thriller feature "Runaway Jury"
2004:
Played a former president who runs for mayor of a small town against a local candidate in "Welcome to Mooseport"

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute