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Robert Gutknecht

Robert Gutknecht

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: Sound ...
RATE AND COMMENT

COMPLETE FILMOGRAPHY WITH SYNOPSIS

Sound (feature film)

1.
Murphy's Romance (1985) as Sound Effects Editor
A divorced woman and her son move to small town to take on a horse ranch.
2.
Summer Rental (1985)
A working-class guy saves up the money and hauls his family to Florida for a vacation in a rented house, but once there things don't go as planned.
3.
Staying Alive (1983) as Sound Editor
Sequel to "Saturday Night Fever." Tony Manero strikes out for the bright lights of Broadway.
4.
Grease 2 (1982) as Sound Effects Editor
A doo-wop hootenanny featuring one of the earliest screen appearances of Michelle Pfeiffer, "Grease 2" (1982) features the return of the Pink Ladies and T-Birds of Rydell High, with a new story that stars Maxwell Caulfield as a British transfer student who is a nebbish by day and a cool rider at night. Featuring '50s heartthrob Tab Hunter, Adrian Zmed, Sid Caesar, and Judy Garland's other daughter, Lorna Luft. Songs include "Back to School," "Cool Rider" and "Girl for All Seasons."
5.
Annie (1982) as Sound Editor
An orphan attracts the attention of a Wall Street tycoon and a con artist.
6.
Stunts Unlimited (1980)
A group of Hollywood stunt performers are recruited by former U.S. Intelligence agent Glenn Corbett to retrieve a stolen laser gun from a notorious arms dealer in this pilot to a prospective series. One member of the team, Sam J. Jones, is best remembered for playing "Flash Gordon" in the 1982 movie

Sound (TV Mini-Series)

7.
Shogun (1980)
A landmark in the miniseries genre, which occupies a permanent niche alongside "Roots," "Centennial" and "Rich Man, Poor Man", this 12-hour, six-part adaptation of James Clavell's best-seller follows the fortunes of an ambitious English navigator who is shipwrecked with his Dutch crew in feudal Japan, finds himself enmeshed in a long battle between two powerful warlords, and eventually becomes the first western Shogun (or chief samurai). Unique in its initial presentation with much of it spoken in untranslated Japanese (subtitles were added in its network rerun several years later), it had a voice-over narration by Orson Welles, made a matinee idol of Richard Chamberlain, and introduced to American TV veteran Japanese star Toshiro Mifune (as the Shogun) and newcomer Yoko Shimada (as Chamberlain's love interest and interpreter).<P>All three stars, in addition to Yuki Meguro (as a samurai warrior) and John Rhys-Davies (as a flamboyant Portuguese pirate ship captain), received Emmy Award nominations for acting. Winning an Emmy as Outstanding Dramatic Series, "Shogun" also received nominations for direction, writing, photography, production design, art direction, set decoration, editing and film sound editing--and winning for costume design and main title design. Subsequently it was edited down from 12 hours to just over three for a theatrical version shown overseas and to a two-hour-plus version for home videotape and videodisc (these had some nudity as well as more graphic violence than was in the miniseries). In July 1984, "Shogun" was given a network premiere in a 2 1/2 hour movie form.

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