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Clarence Brown

Clarence Brown

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Also Known As: Clarence L. Brown Died: August 17, 1987
Born: May 10, 1890 Cause of Death: kidney failure
Birth Place: Clinton, Massachusetts, USA Profession: director, producer, editor, assistant director, technical engineer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Although he trained as an engineer and expected to pursue a career in the automotive industry, Clarence Brown became enamoured of the burgeoning new industry of filmmaking around 1914 and switched careers. The Massachusetts-born, Tennessee-raised Brown became an assistant to director Maurice Tourneur at Peerless Studio in New Jersey. Following WWI (during which he served as a flying instructor), he rejoined Tourneur and got his first chance to direct a film when his mentor fell ill during the shooting of "The Last of the Mohicans" (1920). Later that year, Brown made his solo directing debut with "The Great Redeemer," co-written by actor John Gilbert.

Although he trained as an engineer and expected to pursue a career in the automotive industry, Clarence Brown became enamoured of the burgeoning new industry of filmmaking around 1914 and switched careers. The Massachusetts-born, Tennessee-raised Brown became an assistant to director Maurice Tourneur at Peerless Studio in New Jersey. Following WWI (during which he served as a flying instructor), he rejoined Tourneur and got his first chance to direct a film when his mentor fell ill during the shooting of "The Last of the Mohicans" (1920). Later that year, Brown made his solo directing debut with "The Great Redeemer," co-written by actor John Gilbert.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Plymouth Adventure (1952) Director
2.
  When in Rome (1952) Director
4.
  Angels in the Outfield (1951) Director
5.
  Intruder in the Dust (1950) Director
6.
  To Please a Lady (1950) Director
7.
  Song of Love (1947) Director
8.
  The Yearling (1947) Director
9.
  National Velvet (1945) Director
10.

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Fifteen Wives (1934)
3.
 The Signal Tower (1924) Switch man
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
At age 11, moved to Knoxville, Tennessee
1909:
Worked in engineering department at Moline Company, an automobile manufacturer
:
Moved to Massachusetts and worked for Stevens Duryea Company
:
Opened a car dealership in Birmingham, Alabama
1914:
Became an assistant director to Maurice Tourneur at Peerless Studio in New Jersey
1917:
Served as a flying instructor during WWI
1920:
Directorial debut, co-helming (with Tourneur), "The Last of the Mohicans"
1920:
Solo directing debut, "The Great Redeemer", co-written by John Gilbert
:
Was under contract with Universal
1922:
Scripted and directed "The Light in the Dark"
1925:
Helmed "The Eagle", starring Rudolph Valentino
1926:
Signed to a contract by MGM
1927:
Directed Greta Garbo in "Flesh & the Devil", co-starring John Gilbert
1928:
Received producing credit on "The Trail of '98"
1929:
First sound film, "Navy Blues"
1930:
Helmed Garbo's first talking picture, "Anna Christie"; earned Oscar nomination as Best Director; was also nominated for the silent "Romance", starring Garbo
1931:
Guided Lionel Barrymore to an Oscar in "A Free Soul"; earned third Best Director Academy Award nomination
1935:
Reunited with Garbo on "Anna Karenina"
1937:
Last film with Garbo, "Conquest"
1939:
Directed "The Idiot's Delight", starring Clark Gable and Norma Shearer
1939:
Made what is arguably one of his best movies, "The Rains Came"; was on loan to 20th Century Fox
1943:
Helmed "The Human Comedy", featuring Mickey Rooney; received fourth Oscar nomination as Best Director
1945:
Was director of "National Velvet", co-written by Helen Deutsch; earned fifth Academy Award nomination
1946:
Picked up sixth Oscar nod as Best Director for "The Yearling"
1950:
Tackled racial tolerance in "Intruder in the Dust"
1951:
Produced and directed "Angels in the Outfield"
1952:
Second collaboration with screenwriter Helen Deutsch, "Plymouth Adventure"; last film as director
1953:
Final film as producer, "Never Let Me Go"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Knoxville High School: Knoxville , Tennessee -
University of Tennessee, Knoxville: Knoxville , Tennessee -

Notes

On his career, Clarence Brown was quoted as saying, "I only knew what was human and what I saw in real life. I can't make anything unless it's the best I can do."

Family close complete family listing

father:
Larkin H Brown. Loom repairer.

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