skip navigation
Charlotte Greenwood

Charlotte Greenwood

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (2)

Recent DVDs

 
 

The Alice Faye Collection... This 4-disc comprehensive collection features four can't-miss classics and... more info $49.98was $49.98 Buy Now

Young People DVD Shirley Temple stars in this charming 1940 musical comedy about a show-biz... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Betty Grable Collection, Vol. 1... Four Technicolor films showcase "The Girl with the Million-Dollar Legs" in "The... more info $49.98was $49.98 Buy Now

Moon Over Miami DVD Betty Grable and Don Ameche star in this Technicolor musical about two lovely... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Shirley Temple Collection: Volume 6... Delight in America's biggest little star in volume six of this ongoing... more info $29.98was $29.98 Buy Now

Flying High DVD Man-crazy waitress Pansy Potts (Charlotte Greenwood) offers $500 for a husband.... more info $17.99was $17.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Frances Charlotte Greenwood Died: January 18, 1978
Born: June 25, 1890 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Profession: actor, comedian, dancer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

This long-legged, gangly comic actress' career stretched from turn-of-the-century vaudeville to the splashy musical films of WWII and beyond. Charlotte Greenwood left school early and took to the stage, first as a chorus girl in "The White Cat" (1905), later in vaudeville with Eunice Burnham, billed as "Two Girls and a Piano". She became a star with the stage show "So Long, Letty" (1916), which established her character for all time: a rowdy, man-chasing gal with a good heart and a stork-like dancing skill ("Lady Longlegs" was Greenwood's nickname). With her long face and prominent chin, Greenwood was not pretty in a conventional sense, but she nonetheless starred in a series of "Lettys": "Linger Longer, Letty" (1919), "Letty Pepper" (1922), "Leaning on Letty" (1935). Greenwood appeared in a number of other shows, as well as two indifferent silent films, "Jane" (1915) and "Baby Mine" (1927). It took the talkies to establish Greenwood's film career. With the success of her speaking debut, "So Long, Letty" (1930), Greenwood was starred in a series of slap-dash musicals and comedies in the early 1930s. Most were unbearable: "Parlor, Bedroom and Bath", "Flying High" (both 1931, with Buster Keaton and...

This long-legged, gangly comic actress' career stretched from turn-of-the-century vaudeville to the splashy musical films of WWII and beyond. Charlotte Greenwood left school early and took to the stage, first as a chorus girl in "The White Cat" (1905), later in vaudeville with Eunice Burnham, billed as "Two Girls and a Piano". She became a star with the stage show "So Long, Letty" (1916), which established her character for all time: a rowdy, man-chasing gal with a good heart and a stork-like dancing skill ("Lady Longlegs" was Greenwood's nickname). With her long face and prominent chin, Greenwood was not pretty in a conventional sense, but she nonetheless starred in a series of "Lettys": "Linger Longer, Letty" (1919), "Letty Pepper" (1922), "Leaning on Letty" (1935). Greenwood appeared in a number of other shows, as well as two indifferent silent films, "Jane" (1915) and "Baby Mine" (1927).

It took the talkies to establish Greenwood's film career. With the success of her speaking debut, "So Long, Letty" (1930), Greenwood was starred in a series of slap-dash musicals and comedies in the early 1930s. Most were unbearable: "Parlor, Bedroom and Bath", "Flying High" (both 1931, with Buster Keaton and Bert Lahr, respectively), but Greenwood invariably got off a laugh or two with her robust high spirits. One of the high points was the sprightly Eddie Cantor vehicle "Palmy Days" (also 1931), with Greenwood leading a large group of chorines in an exercise song-and-dance routine to the song, "Bend Down, Sister". By this time married to Martin Broones, head of MGM's music department (an early marriage to actor Cyril Ring had ended in scandal), Greenwood returned to the stage in the mid-30s.

20th Century-Fox rediscovered the middle-aged actress in 1940, casting her as Shirley Temple's adoptive mother (and Jack Oakie's wife) in the musical "Young People". She was such a hit that Fox signed her to a long-term contract, supporting such stars as Betty Grable, Alice Faye and Carmen Miranda in colorful musicals such as "Down Argentine Way" (1940), "Moon Over Miami" (1941), "Springtime in the Rockies" (1942) and "The Gang's All Here" (1943), among others. Playing the wise-cracking aunt or chaperone, Greenwood generally got the chance to show off her still-impressive dancing skills, her mile-high sideways kicks and comically eccentric coordination as amusing as ever.

Greenwood's career slowed in the 1950s, her later films including "Dangerous When Wet" (1953) and "Oklahoma" (1955), the latter in the role of Aunt Eller, which had been written for her but played onstage by Betty Garde. Her last film was the ill-advised musicalized remake of "The Women", "The Opposite Sex" (1956). Wealthy and happily married, Greenwood retired in Los Angeles, where she died at the age of 87 in 1978.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 The Opposite Sex (1956) Lucy
2.
 Glory (1956) Agnes Tilbee
3.
 Oklahoma! (1955) Aunt Eller
4.
 Dangerous When Wet (1953) Ma Higgins
5.
 Peggy (1950) Mrs. Emelia Fielding
6.
 The Great Dan Patch (1949) Aunt Netty
7.
 Oh, You Beautiful Doll (1949) Anna Breitenbach
8.
 Driftwood (1947) Mathilda
9.
 Wake Up and Dream (1946) Sara March
10.
 Home in Indiana (1944) Penelope Bolt
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1905:
Broadway debut, in chorus of "The White Cat"
:
Toured in vaudeville with Eunice Burnham late 1900s-early 1910s
1915:
First film, "Jane"
1916:
Breakthrough stage role, "So Long, Letty"
1929:
First talking film, "So Long, Letty", an adaptation of her stage success
1940:
Signed long-term contract with 20th Century-Fox
1950:
Final Broadway appearance, "Out of This World"
1956:
Final film, "The Opposite Sex"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Notes

On her comic acrobatics: "One day I happened to put my foot up and twist it round a little. Something in the way I did it made the audience laugh . . . as I found it amused people I began to do more and more weird stunts . . . I'm so identified with this kind of part that I'm afraid I'd have a lot of trouble if I tried to take up anything else. If I were playing in an Ibsen tragedy the audience would probably expect me to put one foot on the mantlepiece." --Charlotte Greenwood, quoted in unidentified 1916 newspaper

On her appearance: "The kind of wrapping you come in has nothing to do with it. As quickly as you realize that, contentment and peace come--from the heart. Happiness is within you." --Charlotte Greenwood, quoted in WHATEVER BECAME OF...? by Richard Lamparski

Companions close complete companion listing

husband:
Cyril Ring. Actor. Younger brother of vaudeville star Blanche Ring; married in 1915; divorced in 1920.
husband:
Martin Broones. Composer. Married from 1924 until hi death in the late 1970s.

Family close complete family listing

great-great-grandfather:
Andrew Jacquette. Revolutionary war hero.

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute